Anglia Research Services - Intestate Wills

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Deaths, Funerals & Probate
71 replies 45.1K views
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  • edited 16 December 2013 at 8:47PM
    John_PierpointJohn_Pierpoint Forumite
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    edited 16 December 2013 at 8:47PM
    It is quite a common surname and I was approached by my potential second cousin, who had been told by one of his ancient relatives, before she died, that he must be related to me, in that we might have shared a great grandfather or was it a great great grand father.
    I told him the story of "us" coming to London !!!!!! Whittington style circa 1850 and he explained that as far as he knew his family had been living in [a parish of London] since circa 1800, so sorry the dates and sex relationships don't match up.
    That was before I discovered the disowned black-sheep great-uncle.
    Now I have discovered that great uncle's potential bride came from (blow me) the same parish in inner London. My information is from a sort of war memorial book for those who were killed in a coastal resort. [a hotel address to which she could well have fled to avoid the blitz.]
    I am having trouble finding the death certificate, let alone marriage and birth certificates for this woman but London can be tricky as the "parish" names have changed, very often twice in the last 100 years, as have their geographical boundaries.

    So that is the genealogy, the inheritance is another matter. I would think that something "illegal" done by a trustee over 40 years ago, is most probably dead and buried legally ?
    If not it must be sleeping dogs lie.
  • madbadrobmadbadrob Forumite
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    John,

    Genealogy can be the most rewarding and most infuriating hobby anyone can have.

    Rob
  • John_PierpointJohn_Pierpoint Forumite
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    I shared an office with an addict in 1976 BC.

    Being in central London, he had got to the stage where he was trying to teach himself Latin to translate some of the documents.
  • Thanks everyone for your information about how ancestry and it's complexities my question about Anglia seam to have restarted some interest in this subject. Thanks Rob for the info about charges and VAT. Would still like to here from anyone out there who has actually received some money from Anglia to put my mind at rest before I sign the paperwork for Anglia to represent me. Yours hopefully Potter
  • mjdh1957mjdh1957 Forumite
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    There is only a vanishingly small chance that anyone who reads these forums has had any dealings with a particular named company.
    Retired in 2015.
    Moved to Ireland September 2017
  • madbadrobmadbadrob Forumite
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    Potter,

    The best I can suggest is you contact the case manager and speak to him/her personally. They should answer all your concerns etc but I would advise from the knowledge I have about them that you would be safe to do so. At the end of the day it will cost you nothing but a stamp and in time you will end up with a legacy that you would not have known about.

    Rob
  • Rob. I found out today that my second cousin who was unmarried and lived alone has passed away and I don't know if he has left a will. A few years ago he mentioned that he had cousin on his mothers side. My dad (who has died) was his cousin. If his first cousin on his mothers side exists would they inherit all of the estate or would I as a second cousin be able to claim what would have been my dad share. Regards Potter
  • madbadrobmadbadrob Forumite
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    Potter

    If he died intestate there is a strict line of eligibility. First would be the spouse however in this case he didnt have one. So if he had any children they would be next. If there are no children then the next to inherit are the parents and I am assuming they will have passed away as well. herein it gets a little complicated however the next to inherit would be aunts and uncles from both sides. If any of those have died the children of those would inherit the uncles share.

    Now the complicated bit. If for example one of the aunts or uncles died after the intestate leaving a will then that will comes into place and stops the natural progression to the children of that person.

    Now in your situation when you say second cousin do you mean that your dad was a cousin ie a child of one of the deceased's siblings? If so then you are a first cousin once removed. A second cousin is one whose common ancestor would be the great grand parent of the deceased.

    If that is not clear let me know. Also I am guessing this is the estate that Anglia contacted you about

    Rob
  • BobQBobQ Forumite
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    jimmo wrote: »
    If Anglia Research are who I think they are you have nothing to lose by going along with them.
    .

    So if you are the heir to a £1m fortune and they take a third of it you have nothing to lose? Bizzare.
    Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are incapable of forming such opinions.
  • BobQBobQ Forumite
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    We have been approached by a company called Anglia Research who tell us that we are likely beneficiaries from an intestate will. They will organise things for a whopping commission. Does anyone know how this can be investigated without handing over about a third of any legacy we are entitled to?

    Thanks

    Its an interesting insight into the industry provided by madbadrob.

    As someone who has done a fair bit of genealogical research for myself I think if I had received the letter I would at least look at the family surnames I knew were in my ancestry and compare with the Treasury List before I signed anything, on the off chance that one of the more unusual names might be there. If it was, I might try a little more genealogy in that area.

    However, I agree you could spend a lot of effort trying to prove such a relationship particularly with a common surname, with no guarantee of any success.
    Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are incapable of forming such opinions.
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