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  • FIRST POST
    HugoSP
    Matt emulsion on lime plaster walls?
    • #1
    • 2nd Feb 08, 10:48 PM
    Matt emulsion on lime plaster walls? 2nd Feb 08 at 10:48 PM
    Are we OK using the B&Q magnolia matt emulsion on lime plaster walls?

    We have split off a large room into 2 smaller rooms. Judging by a 1 penny coin found in a lathe and plaster wall we took down the original plasterwork was done at 1885 at the earliset (quaint find!).

    It seems like typical turn of the century lime based render with a lime finishing plaster ontop.

    The plasterwork we left is in reasonably good condition considering it's been up for over 100 years.

    We have repaired the holes with Limelite rendering plaster (lime based render in a bag) and will be skimming the whole lot with Limelite High impact finishing plaster to give a consistent finish.

    So, magnolia on top, with the first coat watered down 20% sound OK?

    I'm fine on the building side, it's just the decorating that I'm crap on

    The 1885 penny is to be walled up again along with a 2007 penny and a note as to what we found and what we are doing.
    Behind every great man is a good woman

    Beside this ordinary man is a great woman
    2 savings jar - now at 3.42
Page 1
  • nickj
    • #2
    • 3rd Feb 08, 9:23 AM
    • #2
    • 3rd Feb 08, 9:23 AM
    if the plaster need to breathe then limewash would be the best , if not the walls need to be sealed with a stabilizing solution and then painted with emulsion

    www.farrowandball.com
  • ajbaker
    • #3
    • 4th Feb 08, 2:28 PM
    • #3
    • 4th Feb 08, 2:28 PM
    I'm not familiar with the Limelite products, and would have been very cautious of choosing their products over a standard lime plaster. That said, if that is what you have chosen, go for it... everyone has a different opinion.

    You are very fortunate to have such old plaster and for it to remain in a good condition. Whatever you chose there is no advantage in losing the benefits of lime over other plasters, and you are clearly aware of the advantages lime brings otherwise you would not be thinking of the Limelite product... therefore I would also recommend you choose a breathable paint, if not a lime wash.

    Lime wash will be your cheapest option. Do not purchase the F&B lime wash - it is horrendously expensive. You would be better purchasing a small tub of lime putty and mixing it with water (50:50). That's lime wash.

    Alternatively you can purchase a breathable paint, of which there are many ranging from very cheap to very expensive.

    Lime putty or lime wash can be purchased from http://www.mikewye.co.uk/

    They also stock a range of paints from Natural Building Technologies and Biofa which you may consider. If you need advice, give them a ring. Delivery can be expensive, so it may be worth trying to source a local supplier.
  • HugoSP
    • #4
    • 5th Feb 08, 10:15 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Feb 08, 10:15 PM
    Well today I spoke to Tarmac who make the limelite products.

    The rep suggested a contract emulsion watered down 50:50 for the first coat. 25:75 for the second coat and neat for the third. The important thing is not to use a vynal of any sort.

    I have already finished patching with the renovating plaster and am now using the finishing plaster. It's a little different to thistle multi finish as you can't polish it afterwards. The finish is different in texture but importantly is now relitively consistent over a whole wall that I have done. I'll probably do another coat tomorrow.

    Apparently the difficult thing about using the finishing plaster over existing walls is that there is no suction on old walls, and the finishing plaster needs PVA to stick to older walls.

    Hopefully my choice not to use multi finish on these walls will mean that the walls won't blister at a later date. Like most people I have used multi finish on lime plaster walls but I reckon this is the better way to go.
    Behind every great man is a good woman

    Beside this ordinary man is a great woman
    2 savings jar - now at 3.42
  • louisejch
    • #5
    • 31st Mar 08, 3:40 PM
    • #5
    • 31st Mar 08, 3:40 PM
    Apologies if this is too late to be of any use, but it might be worth knowing that Limelite is a cement-based product with only a bit of lime in it, & isn't breathable like lime plaster is. It's a product that builders use to make a job quick & easy if they don't want or don't know how to use lime plaster. Which means that it doesn't really matter what paint you're using on top - the plaster isn't breatheable so it's not much use if the paint is. If you want properly breathable walls, you need to use a real lime plaster and then a breatheable paint.
    L
  • Stevis2002
    • #6
    • 8th Jun 08, 8:57 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Jun 08, 8:57 PM
    Sorry, but i'd only ever use Limewash on Lime Plaster.
    My personal preference, but when i was looking for informtion, i found this website of great use.

    http://www.sublimerenovations.co.uk
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