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Any tips to stop condensation on windows?
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# 1
fender
Old 22-10-2007, 10:46 AM
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Default Any tips to stop condensation on windows?

Any tips to stop condensation on windows please?

I did hear some suggestions last winter but cannot recall them now.

Thanks.

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# 2
annie123
Old 22-10-2007, 12:30 PM
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Good question.
I cant have double glazing in our building, and I leave the window ajar evey evening but it was really bad this morning, but it is only ever in our north facing living room :confused:

I look forward to someone answering.
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# 3
bloomin freezing
Old 22-10-2007, 3:44 PM
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In the past I have placed a bowl of salt on the window sill, this has soaked up a lot of moisture but not all of it. We rent from a local housing association and they arranged for us to have some kind of fan/humidifier sitted into the ceiling on the landing this has helped top a degree also but my daughters bedroom sill has wet windows each morning.
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# 4
olly300
Old 22-10-2007, 3:46 PM
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I've never been able to stop it completely when I lived in single glazed places.

Just found this- http://www.diydata.com/problem/conde...ndensation.php
"n Britain, condensation will almost always occur with single glazed windows. "


I use to use those condensation collecting things (can't remember what they are called) which you can buy from Wilkinsons and Woolworths. They have crystals in which absorb water and then you empty the water out. For some windows you will need 2 but for others you will need one and I found some brands better than others.

Right they are called moisture traps - http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Kontrol-Stream...QQcmdZViewItem
And I'm sure the brand advertised in the link was the one that I found useless.

Last edited by olly300; 22-10-2007 at 3:50 PM. Reason: more info
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# 5
macka0
Old 22-10-2007, 3:47 PM
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just fit a trickle vent,this should seriously reduce the amount of condensation

Last edited by macka0; 22-10-2007 at 3:58 PM.
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# 6
Party_Animal
Old 22-10-2007, 5:14 PM
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Difficult to stop completely. Anne your north facing windows will be the coldest and most likely to steam up. Basically there are 3 factors;
Heat
Insulation
Ventilation
The warmer the air in the room the less likely it is to condense ( won't go on about dew point etc). Suffice to say that increasing insulation will help keep it above dew point.
Ventilation is paramount as you've found by opening the window. Ideally you want a cross flow. Double glazing does help by roughly halving the U value.
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# 7
roddydogs
Old 22-10-2007, 5:53 PM
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Double glazing has no effect on condensation-its just that single glazing being colder will show it more.
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# 8
chatta
Old 22-10-2007, 5:58 PM
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If you have a cooker extract fan use it, it will stop damp air in house from cooking.
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# 9
Poppycat
Old 22-10-2007, 6:00 PM
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Heat, ventilation is the key, the hotter the room the more it can adsorb moisture.

Insulation helps but that isnt always practical, a dehumidifier does help as it takes excessive moisture from the air

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# 10
Party_Animal
Old 22-10-2007, 7:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roddydogs View Post
Double glazing has no effect on condensation-its just that single glazing being colder will show it more.
Not strictly true Roddy. Double glazing does help to reduce condensation, by reducing the amount of heat lost through the building.
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# 11
annie123
Old 22-10-2007, 9:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Party_Animal View Post
Difficult to stop completely. Anne your north facing windows will be the coldest and most likely to steam up. Basically there are 3 factors;
Heat
Insulation
Ventilation
The warmer the air in the room the less likely it is to condense ( won't go on about dew point etc). Suffice to say that increasing insulation will help keep it above dew point.
Ventilation is paramount as you've found by opening the window. Ideally you want a cross flow. Double glazing does help by roughly halving the U value.
It is a deep bay window so I will try opening the top opporsite window and leaving the living room door open tonight to see if that helps.
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# 12
jackorama1
Old 22-10-2007, 11:29 PM
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Hi I'm a new poster here, but I happened to notice this thread and feel the need to reply.

We have double glazing of 2 types, three windows of the old (real-looking UPVC, but made of metal and covered in white stuff) double glazing, and the rest of the house is new style white plastic UPVC. We get condensation on all windows in autumn/winter/spring (i'm looking it now as I type). We are soon to be changing the older windows to new UPVC ones which should help, as condensation literally runs off these windows at the moment. But I wonder if our 'newer' windows need changed too because I am at a loss as to why we have such a condensation problem.

We don't create any more moisture than you're average household (theres 2 of us), we dry clothes outside as much as possible, we open windows often, we have central heating which we run in the morning and evening, we have a fan in kitchen and bathroom. Our house is airy and doesn't have dampness.

Any ideas appreciated! (I'm sick of getting the window cleaning blade out to 'do the windows' every morning)
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# 13
macka0
Old 23-10-2007, 7:52 AM
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Just get trickle vents installed in the new ones or buy some and fit them your self....just a series of drill holes and then attach the vent over the top of them to the head of the window making sure you miss the glass of course ..this really does help the problem and all for the matter of a few quid
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# 14
Never Enough Money
Old 23-10-2007, 8:07 AM
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Hi macka0

Where can you buy these trickle vents? we have a small condensation problem in our house, the double glazing is old. But we can't afford to replace it. Sounds like this could help.


Thanks
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# 15
maninthestreet
Old 23-10-2007, 10:20 AM
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Buy a dehumidifier, leave it on overnight.
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# 16
ormus
Old 23-10-2007, 11:03 AM
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as been said, ventilation is the key factor. fit some trickle vents.
make your/any airbricks are clear.
Get some gorm.
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# 17
burnsguitarman
Old 23-10-2007, 11:43 AM
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Hi, I have been following this thread with interest, we are thinking of fitting trickle vents to our upvc bay window. The house is a 1920's semi, when we moved in 5 yrs ago there was no double glazing or insulation at all. We got a grant and had cavity wall and loft insulation (which has been very worthwhile). However when the wall insulation was done the contractors filled all the exsisting air-bricks up with silicone (or similar). We now get condensation on the windows when it is cold, if we close the thick curtains it seems to be much worse than when we use the blinds alone. I was wondering if it would be better to unblock the air bricks ( these only seem to be on the outside only into the cavity) or fit new air-bricks at high level, or fit trickle vents to the windows. Any advice would be appreciated.
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# 18
macka0
Old 23-10-2007, 2:20 PM
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just found this place online...never used it b4 so its not a recommend and also i think you could find them a lot cheaper
http://www.handlestore.com/trickle-v...g=GventTrick01
but probably best going to a local upvc window manufacturor and picking them up there
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# 19
Party_Animal
Old 23-10-2007, 3:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burnsguitarman View Post
Hi, I have been following this thread with interest, we are thinking of fitting trickle vents to our upvc bay window. The house is a 1920's semi, when we moved in 5 yrs ago there was no double glazing or insulation at all. We got a grant and had cavity wall and loft insulation (which has been very worthwhile). However when the wall insulation was done the contractors filled all the exsisting air-bricks up with silicone (or similar). We now get condensation on the windows when it is cold, if we close the thick curtains it seems to be much worse than when we use the blinds alone. I was wondering if it would be better to unblock the air bricks ( these only seem to be on the outside only into the cavity) or fit new air-bricks at high level, or fit trickle vents to the windows. Any advice would be appreciated.
The vents shouldn't be sealed up. They should be sleeved through the cavity insulation.
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# 20
qtlc
Old 04-11-2007, 2:46 PM
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"The vents shouldn't be sealed up. They should be sleeved through the cavity insulation."

You sure?

Thats what happened to ours last week when we got loft insulation and cavity wall installed. They left the ones that vent under the floorboards ok but said they had to seal off the ones in the walls.

I was thinking of drilling it back out as the condensation ever since has been quite bad on all our windows, especially in the bedroom.

Last edited by qtlc; 04-11-2007 at 3:06 PM.
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