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    • april89
    • By april89 8th Jan 18, 5:00 PM
    • 15Posts
    • 1Thanks
    april89
    Double Glazing Quote
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:00 PM
    Double Glazing Quote 8th Jan 18 at 5:00 PM
    Hi,

    My OH and I moved into our house a few months ago and are looking to replace the double glazing as we can see daylight around a number of the frames and can feel the draft... However we have no idea how to judge whether the following price is fair. Nor is haggling something that comes naturally to either. We have already emailed some other companies to get comparitive quotes but how can we tell what might be the best price we could expect for a quality service and product in line with the below?

    The current quote for the below is £11,273.

    We have requested a quote for 15 standard balanced windows (with trickle air vents on opening windows) in uPVC white frames, approximate dimensions as follows:
    • 1x 2200mm wide by 2070mm high (split four equal windows wide, two unequal windows high. Top left and top right window opening)
    • 1x 2240mm wide by 1020mm high (four windows split vertically, one opening window each end)
    • 1x 630mm wide by 720mm high (one widow hinged at top)
    • 1x 1600mm wide by 2100mm high (currently split three equal windows wide, two unequal windows high, none opening)
    • 1x 1200mm wide by 1000mm high (two windows split vertically, one opening)
    • 1x 1200mm wide by 900mm high (two windows split vertically, one opening)
    • 9x 1200mm wide by 1050mm high (two windows split vertically, one opening)
    2 doors:

    • One composite door with two full height glass side panels (total opening approx 1500mm wide and 2070 high)
    • One UPVC door (total opening approx 830mm wide by 2070mm high)
    Thanks in advance for any help.
    We've not needed to look into anything with so big an outlay before so it's quite daunting!
Page 1
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 8th Jan 18, 5:10 PM
    • 1,026 Posts
    • 623 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:10 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:10 PM
    Get several quotes and include some smaller local companies in your search. They are more likely to give you an honest quote 1st time around rather than having to listen to hours of sales talk, a quote that is only available today, a call to my manager to see if we can give you a special deal etc etc.
    • april89
    • By april89 9th Jan 18, 7:54 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    april89
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 7:54 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 7:54 AM
    Thanks Tom99. We have only approached small to medium sized companies so far as the likes of Anglian do not have an email address or contact form and I don't want to give them our phone number and address to get stuck with the hardsale tactics!

    We got our second quote back last weekend. This was for £12,273 but for A+ instead of A rated windows. Does anyone know how both quotes compare?
    • cyantist
    • By cyantist 9th Jan 18, 11:43 AM
    • 494 Posts
    • 1,065 Thanks
    cyantist
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:43 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:43 AM
    We have recently got some quotes. The best we had was £4950 for 5 windows (880X1200, 550*1220 obscure glazed, 1340x1180, 1690x1560, 1690x1560) and 2 doors (one UPVC one composite).

    We stupidly had someone from Anglian come and they obviously stayed for ages. But we had britelite come as well and the guy said upfront he wasn't going to waste our time with a ridiculous price which will magically lower once he calls his boss etc etc. That was ~£5100, but with triple glazing (not necessary but it was the same price as double so why not). It was quite refreshing to have a large company come out, not take the p*ss at all, give a decent quote, and say take your time deciding. So if you do want a quote from a large company for comparison (and britelite install in your area - I think they are only in the south) and don't have 4 hours to waste on someone who insults your intelligence, get them round.
    • april89
    • By april89 9th Jan 18, 1:09 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    april89
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:09 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:09 PM
    Thanks for the suggestion of Britelite cyanist. I've emailed them now to see how their quote compares and their website was far more user friendly than the Anglian/Everest ones!
    • cyantist
    • By cyantist 9th Jan 18, 1:53 PM
    • 494 Posts
    • 1,065 Thanks
    cyantist
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:53 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:53 PM
    They do get really good reviews compared to most window companies and so we've decided to go with them. So depending on your timescale I'll let you know how it all works out.
    • greenface
    • By greenface 10th Jan 18, 7:15 PM
    • 4,620 Posts
    • 2,340 Thanks
    greenface
    • #7
    • 10th Jan 18, 7:15 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Jan 18, 7:15 PM
    alot more info to be accurate but that's above what I was thinking in price and I would be looking at about £9k fitted . who suggested trickle vents ? are they there now .& Is the 1600x2100 floor level and downstairs . would /could that turn into a door . or upstairs door with a flat balcony rail . looks good . Different araes differ in price sometimes by a lot (I'm Merseyside ) stay local and get some recommendations and keep your eyes open for people fitting ATM .
    North Wales Holiday Home Owner
    • april89
    • By april89 10th Jan 18, 8:55 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    april89
    • #8
    • 10th Jan 18, 8:55 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Jan 18, 8:55 PM
    Thanks Greenface. We live near the Hampshire/Wiltshire border but that's really helpful to have a target to aim for.

    To answer your questions we don't currently have trickle vents (although we do have daylight around the edges of some of the frames) but it was the suggestion of the double glazing salesman that we should have them. We don't have any brick vents? air vents? in the property and we do have a log burner so we understand that some airflow might be a good thing but we could leave the new windows on the 'sneck' ?! a lot more as we don't currently have that option.

    By the fact that you ask can I assume that they may not be a necessary addition? The frames look nicer without them...

    The large 1600x2100 window is floor level. I did consider turning it into bi-fold or large patio doors but this window is in the kitchen facing the driveway (the house has a slightly odd layout). There is already a patio door from the kitchen to the rear garden and the front door opens onto the driveway so we don't think it would be an improvement. It's a real shame the large window isn't onto the garden as that would have been amazing!
    • loadsofhounds
    • By loadsofhounds 11th Jan 18, 2:18 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    loadsofhounds
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 18, 2:18 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 18, 2:18 PM
    Hi all, I'm a new poster so hope you don't mind jumping on the bandwagon!
    If there is another thread where I should be posting this do tell me
    I've just brought my first place and am looking for some advice on the double glazing. I've realised that the windows don't sit in the frames snugly and are quite (very) drafty. I've got the guarantee (they were fitted August 2008) and have rung the chap that fitted them but he says he has retired. Does this mean my guarantee is worthless?
    Any advice gratefully received!
    • Raxiel
    • By Raxiel 11th Jan 18, 4:42 PM
    • 530 Posts
    • 276 Thanks
    Raxiel
    To answer your questions we don't currently have trickle vents (although we do have daylight around the edges of some of the frames) but it was the suggestion of the double glazing salesman that we should have them. We don't have any brick vents? air vents? in the property and we do have a log burner so we understand that some airflow might be a good thing but we could leave the new windows on the 'sneck' ?! a lot more as we don't currently have that option.

    By the fact that you ask can I assume that they may not be a necessary addition? The frames look nicer without them...
    Originally posted by april89
    Trickle vents are mandatory on new windows if they are already fitted, but not if they aren't.
    New windows will have a night latch, which provides more ventilation than the vent, and has the advantage that it can be completely closed when you don't need it. Even a closed trickle vent will let through almost as much noise as an open window unless you fit expensive 'acoustic' covers.

    We just had new windows fitted last week. In our case, the company didn't recommend them, but when asked told us they would be £10 extra each. Alternatively they could be retrofitted if the worst came to the worst, and it turned out the new ( better sealed) windows caused condensation, either in-situ with a drill or (due to our proximity to their factory) by taking the sashes back to the workshop and routing them out.

    After visiting the factory to see a frame for another customer that already had them, we decided against them and so far it's looking like the correct choice.
    • Raxiel
    • By Raxiel 11th Jan 18, 4:56 PM
    • 530 Posts
    • 276 Thanks
    Raxiel
    Hi all, I'm a new poster so hope you don't mind jumping on the bandwagon!
    If there is another thread where I should be posting this do tell me
    I've just brought my first place and am looking for some advice on the double glazing. I've realised that the windows don't sit in the frames snugly and are quite (very) drafty. I've got the guarantee (they were fitted August 2008) and have rung the chap that fitted them but he says he has retired. Does this mean my guarantee is worthless?
    Any advice gratefully received!
    Originally posted by loadsofhounds
    Technically no its not worthless. In practice, claiming on it may be more trouble than it's worth. If the windows themselves are still sound (no misted up panes etc) he could argue that after 9 1/2 years the time to complain about fitting is passed.

    If he were willing to come and fix it, he'd likely just run a bead of silicone round the edge outside (and ideally in, if the gap is 3mm or less), or inject expanding foam, then clean off the excess and then silicon (if its more than 3mm).
    If that's not something you feel confident doing yourself, a general purpose builder on your local council's trusted trader register should be able to do it, and I can't imagine it would be all that expensive.
    • greenface
    • By greenface 11th Jan 18, 7:19 PM
    • 4,620 Posts
    • 2,340 Thanks
    greenface
    Trickle vents are mandatory on new windows if they are already fitted, but not if they aren't.
    New windows will have a night latch, which provides more ventilation than the vent, and has the advantage that it can be completely closed when you don't need it. Even a closed trickle vent will let through almost as much noise as an open window unless you fit expensive 'acoustic' covers.

    We just had new windows fitted last week. In our case, the company didn't recommend them, but when asked told us they would be £10 extra each. Alternatively they could be retrofitted if the worst came to the worst, and it turned out the new ( better sealed) windows caused condensation, either in-situ with a drill or (due to our proximity to their factory) by taking the sashes back to the workshop and routing them out.

    After visiting the factory to see a frame for another customer that already had them, we decided against them and so far it's looking like the correct choice.
    Originally posted by Raxiel
    This person above talks a lot of sense . trickle vents throws your rated windows out of the park . unless its a new build or already there then you do not need them . My only opinion if the boiler is in a bedroom then a wall or trickle vent would be another safety factor . night latches offer a bit more than a trickle vent normally with the option of shutting them closed .
    North Wales Holiday Home Owner
    • april89
    • By april89 13th Jan 18, 9:43 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    april89
    I'm really glad that you raised the potential pitfalls of trickle vents. I hadn't considered that they may significantly impact the window performance as they were being recommended but as the biggest reason we're replacing the windows is to improve thermal efficiency they probably won't be helpful! A bit of further internet research shows they do really seem to be like marmite in the window world but as our current windows don't have them we're very tempted to only have one in the bathroom and one in the en-suite (as their doors are normally shut) and then just open the window/use the second latch position elsewhere. It turns out the boiler room already has an air brick so one shouldn't be needed there.

    Thanks again everyone. Now time to haggle!
    • loadsofhounds
    • By loadsofhounds 14th Jan 18, 8:37 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    loadsofhounds
    Thanks Raxiel for you're reply. I've been watching a couple of videos on youtube, so I might have a go at fixing them myself. I think the hinges might have dropped so I'll start there and if i can't I'll call someone out.
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