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  • FIRST POST
    • kah22
    • By kah22 3rd Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    • 1,285Posts
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    kah22
    Hardwood v Softwood
    • #1
    • 3rd Oct 17, 4:17 PM
    Hardwood v Softwood 3rd Oct 17 at 4:17 PM
    This is my second winter with a wood burning stove and it’s time to restock

    Hardwood is proving difficult to source. The supply I got last year was air dried and pretty uneven to say the least

    I have a source of kiln dried softwood at what seems a decent price for my area. While accepting that hardwood will burn longer, if you consider the price difference between hard and soft is hardwood still the best option. It’s a wood burner proper that I have
    I used to be indecisive,but now I'm not so sure.
Page 1
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 3rd Oct 17, 4:23 PM
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    Hengus
    • #2
    • 3rd Oct 17, 4:23 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Oct 17, 4:23 PM
    My experience is that you will need a garage full of softwood as the rate of burning means that you will be forever on your feet replenishing the stove. I pay a slight premium for kiln dried logs which I find burn consistently with little evidence of soot. They can be hard to source.

    https://www.hetas.co.uk/find-fuels/

    I get my logs from Certainly Woods. Good to deal with and no rubbish in the bags - or logs that are too big for the stove.

    http://solidfuel.co.uk/pdfs/guide_to_wood_and_multifuel.pdf

    See Page 3.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 5th Oct 17, 12:46 AM
    • 1,600 Posts
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    silverwhistle
    • #3
    • 5th Oct 17, 12:46 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Oct 17, 12:46 AM
    Actually the time to restock was probably at the start of the summer! I don't actually buy in wood, I scrounge it and process it myself, so I have to be even further ahead. The poplar I got for free in latge rounds (or 'cheeses') last week is now stacked, I'll process it next spring and _may_ use it at the end of next winter but probably the one after that. It does take a bit of space at the end of my terrace house garden but not inordinately so.

    For the worst of winter I keep some packs of Verdo bricquettes stacked neatly and dryly in the house. They're available at Home Bargains and I mix them with different woods to achieve a decent fire.

    Getting such wood can be competitive. The tree surgeons put up a sign 'free wood' (as poplar isn't very saleable) and by the time I got my boot load (back seats down.) a guy with a trailer had already taken a load. If you're buying try a few different suppliers, but don't forget to use your moisture meter to ensure you're getting what they promise.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 5th Oct 17, 11:13 AM
    • 1,303 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 5th Oct 17, 11:13 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Oct 17, 11:13 AM
    Actually the time to restock was probably at the start of the summer!

    The poplar I got for free in latge rounds (or 'cheeses') last week is now stacked, I'll process it next spring and _may_ use it at the end of next winter but probably the one after that.
    Originally posted by silverwhistle
    Getting wood is indeed best done in spring or early summer - It then has a chance to dry out a bit more before the winter sets in.

    I also got some poplar earlier in the year for free. The trees had been felled with the sap rising and it was very wet. Water was literally pouring out as it was split. I need to restack the pile and see if any of it is ready to burn.

    Not all hardwoods are equal - Some will turn their nose up at poplar as it (apparently) burns fast with less heat. Mixed in with other hard/soft woods, I don't expect it to be a problem.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 6th Oct 17, 6:53 PM
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    Gloomendoom
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:53 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 6:53 PM
    I cut my own firewood but usually leave two to three years before burning. Weight for weight, there is no real difference in heat output whatever flavour of fully seasoned wood you use.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Oct 17, 8:56 AM
    • 23,303 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 15th Oct 17, 8:56 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Oct 17, 8:56 AM
    Weight for weight, there is no real difference in heat output whatever flavour of fully seasoned wood you use.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Certainly, even 'poor' wood like willow, seems to burn fine if properly stored for long enough. Doesn't weigh as much as some hard woods of course.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 15th Oct 17, 12:55 PM
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    A. Badger
    • #7
    • 15th Oct 17, 12:55 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Oct 17, 12:55 PM
    I'm burning some of my own pollarded willow at the moment. It's been dried for three years but it needs that - willow soaks up water like a sponge. It doesn't give out a lot of heat but it bulks-up a fire and burns well enough.

    Bear in mind that in some countries softwood (think pine trees) is almost all they have and yet they manage just fine. The key, as others have said, is to make sure that whatever you burn is good and dry.
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