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Results: Are you voting to remain or leave?

Remain

39.09% • 77 votes

Leave

54.82% • 108 votes

Undecided

6.09% • 12 votes

You may not vote on this poll

197 votes in total.

  • FIRST POST
    • tara747
    • By tara747 24th May 16, 12:17 PM
    • 9,952Posts
    • 26,408Thanks
    tara747
    Referendum: which way are you voting?
    • #1
    • 24th May 16, 12:17 PM
    Referendum: which way are you voting? 24th May 16 at 12:17 PM
    MoneySavingExpert Insert:

    Hi all, if you want to see Martin's view on us leaving the EU read our news story:

    Martin's reaction to Brexit: what will it mean for the economy, mortgages, savings and more?

    Back to the original post...

    ------------

    Just out of curiosity.


    Feel free to state your reasons either way in the comments
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 24-06-2016 at 11:24 AM.
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Page 17
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 14th Oct 16, 8:10 PM
    • 1,496 Posts
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    qwert yuiop
    Well, vive la democratie. Wallonie, the French speaking region of southern Belgium, population 3 million, has vetoed the entire EU's trade deal with Canada.
    Perhaps that court action in Belfast last week will be able to stop Brexit after all? Well, no.

    They weren't even going to reach a helping hand to their cousins in Montreal.
    Last edited by qwert yuiop; 14-10-2016 at 8:15 PM.
    • leftieM
    • By leftieM 15th Oct 16, 3:24 PM
    • 2,099 Posts
    • 1,332 Thanks
    leftieM
    I take it you are talking about CETA? That is great news. Thanks for sharing. Our European neighbours don't bend over and take it quite as readily as we do. How I will miss them.
    Stercus accidit
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 15th Oct 16, 6:11 PM
    • 1,496 Posts
    • 743 Thanks
    qwert yuiop
    It probably won't be too long till Britain and Canada are arranging a trade deal.
    • x12yhp
    • By x12yhp 16th Oct 16, 8:26 PM
    • 731 Posts
    • 392 Thanks
    x12yhp
    Yeah, won't be long because sterling is so low that a trade deal would be daft not to have!

    PS. All that bluster from the daily mail brigade, saying that Brexit won't hurt, dream on. The sterling scenario alone IS (facts from someone on the ground) pushing up the base prices. Making out that Unilever is a big bad wolf is a terrible piece of journalism because it misses the fact that Unilever is only the first one to be so public. Others are in the same boat and the population needs to accept that they will either be paying more for their food or that the suppliers to thus chain begin cutting their jobs because their margins are diminished.
    Always overestimating...
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 17th Oct 16, 1:14 PM
    • 1,496 Posts
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    qwert yuiop
    They'll be paying more for their food until the uk starts buying on the world market. Argentinian beef? Goodbye local beef production, unless we start large scale ranching type of cattle raising. Rollin', Rollin', Rollin'.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 17th Oct 16, 5:45 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy

    PS. All that bluster from the daily mail brigade, saying that Brexit won't hurt, dream on.
    Originally posted by x12yhp
    Whos saying that?

    Of course there'll be short term pain.

    But looking only for the problems and not for the opportunities would be a mistake.


    The sterling scenario alone IS (facts from someone on the ground) pushing up the base prices. Making out that Unilever is a big bad wolf is a terrible piece of journalism because it misses the fact that Unilever is only the first one to be so public. Others are in the same boat and the population needs to accept that they will either be paying more for their food or that the suppliers to thus chain begin cutting their jobs because their margins are diminished.
    Originally posted by x12yhp
    The problem with Unilever is that a significant percentage of their products are produced in the UK, however they were using the weak pound as an opportunity against Tesco.

    We may, in the short term pay more for some items, but likewise is this not a great opportunity to buy locally produced goods?
    Last edited by motorguy; 17-10-2016 at 5:49 PM.
    Regards

    Paul
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 17th Oct 16, 7:38 PM
    • 1,496 Posts
    • 743 Thanks
    qwert yuiop
    That'll be a British car for you then?
    • x12yhp
    • By x12yhp 17th Oct 16, 7:44 PM
    • 731 Posts
    • 392 Thanks
    x12yhp
    Whos saying that?

    Of course there'll be short term pain.

    But looking only for the problems and not for the opportunities would be a mistake.



    The problem with Unilever is that a significant percentage of their products are produced in the UK, however they were using the weak pound as an opportunity against Tesco.

    We may, in the short term pay more for some items, but likewise is this not a great opportunity to buy locally produced goods?
    Originally posted by motorguy
    Our company manufactures 99 percent of our products in the UK. We buy 75 percent or more from UK suppliers. Guess what? Every last supplier has raised their prices. We have raised our prices.

    The media reporting is just nonsense from people who think that a supply chain starts with a buyer and ends with the seller. The truth is that many if not most goods are based on materials which start life priced in euro or dollars and you won't see that with such simplistic analysis.
    Always overestimating...
    • donnac2558
    • By donnac2558 18th Oct 16, 8:38 AM
    • 2,122 Posts
    • 1,716 Thanks
    donnac2558
    Whos saying that?

    Of course there'll be short term pain.

    But looking only for the problems and not for the opportunities would be a mistake.



    The problem with Unilever is that a significant percentage of their products are produced in the UK, however they were using the weak pound as an opportunity against Tesco.

    We may, in the short term pay more for some items, but likewise is this not a great opportunity to buy locally produced goods?
    Originally posted by motorguy
    Tesco and the other big supermarkets might have won, but it was reported last week on the local news UTV. Unilever are now hitting the smaller chains Centra,Mace,Spar and demanding the 10% price increase. These chains do not have the muscle of the big boys so Unilever products are disappearing from the shelves as people will not pay.
    • guiriman
    • By guiriman 18th Oct 16, 10:05 AM
    • 301 Posts
    • 179 Thanks
    guiriman
    Tesco and the other big supermarkets might have won, but it was reported last week on the local news UTV. Unilever are now hitting the smaller chains Centra,Mace,Spar and demanding the 10% price increase. These chains do not have the muscle of the big boys so Unilever products are disappearing from the shelves as people will not pay.
    Originally posted by donnac2558
    Great opportunity for Unilever's competitors then
    • RikM
    • By RikM 18th Oct 16, 1:03 PM
    • 486 Posts
    • 266 Thanks
    RikM
    Great opportunity for Unilever's competitors then
    Originally posted by guiriman
    There's a competitor for Marmite...?
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Oct 16, 1:28 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy
    That'll be a British car for you then?
    Originally posted by qwert yuiop


    Heres my top five reasons why that's not a concern.


    Firstly, this could well be a short term blip in the value of sterling, and is based purely on the fact that the market doesn't like uncertainty to bet on. They don't have some crystal ball or some remarkable insight into how the future will pan out.


    Secondly, the new car market has to remain competitive and incentivised so bumping up prices isn't particularly an option for any manufacturer, so they will try to absorb and currency fluctuations (as they are well used to doing)


    Thirdly, quite a lot of cars are built in the UK, so less likely to be impacted by currency fluctuations.


    Fourthly, generally speaking, buying a brand new car isnts a great idea for most people, so even IF - and its a very big IF - the prices of new cars goes beyond peoples reach (and that will NOT happen), then theres any amount of pre-reg, nearly new and used cars.


    Fifthly, the new car market is pretty much dominated by lease and PCP deals, so the relative price isn't hugely important to people who are looking to spend a fixed amount per month.


    Whilst there may be lots of hand wringing on forums etc about what might happen, businesses such as Mercedes, BMW, Nissan, Toyota, etc will be looking at how best they can take a competitive advantage from any short term turbulence.


    On a personal note, we've a new car on order at a confirmed fixed price, which will see us through a minimum of three years. The other two cars in the household are 12 years old, and 15 years old respectively, so neither likely to be impacted by any of this.


    When the main car is due a change, we'll find the best deal on the best car that suits our requirements and i'm not expecting any big variance.
    Last edited by motorguy; 18-10-2016 at 1:30 PM.
    Regards

    Paul
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Oct 16, 1:33 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy


    Our company manufactures 99 percent of our products in the UK. We buy 75 percent or more from UK suppliers. Guess what? Every last supplier has raised their prices. We have raised our prices.
    Originally posted by x12yhp

    And guess what? I bet a lot of those suppliers are chancing their arm, based on brexit.


    And of course, a weaker pound helps UK businesses export goods more competitively, something the bank of England is probably quite pleased about as a side effect.




    The media reporting is just nonsense from people who think that a supply chain starts with a buyer and ends with the seller. The truth is that many if not most goods are based on materials which start life priced in euro or dollars and you won't see that with such simplistic analysis.

    Originally posted by x12yhp


    And likewise, I am sure your business is looking for opportunities out of this, rather than sitting around hand wringing and focusing on the negatives with a simplistic binary view?
    Last edited by motorguy; 18-10-2016 at 1:40 PM.
    Regards

    Paul
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Oct 16, 1:36 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy
    Tesco and the other big supermarkets might have won, but it was reported last week on the local news UTV. Unilever are now hitting the smaller chains Centra,Mace,Spar and demanding the 10% price increase. These chains do not have the muscle of the big boys so Unilever products are disappearing from the shelves as people will not pay.
    Originally posted by donnac2558


    People will pay or buy someone elses alternative product. I would imagine 99% of people couldn't tell you the price of a jar of marmite if you held a gun to their head anyway.


    These products are not disappearing from shelves because people will not pay, that's frankly unfounded and scaremongering.


    Prices go up a bit on Unilever products, people buy some other brand instead.


    Simples.
    Last edited by motorguy; 18-10-2016 at 1:41 PM.
    Regards

    Paul
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Oct 16, 1:36 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy
    Great opportunity for Unilever's competitors then
    Originally posted by guiriman


    Exactly.


    Successful businesses will be the ones that look for opportunities, not sit around hand wringing.
    Regards

    Paul
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy
    There's a competitor for Marmite...?
    Originally posted by RikM


    Hopefully not...
    Regards

    Paul
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Oct 16, 1:39 PM
    • 13,788 Posts
    • 7,295 Thanks
    motorguy
    On the plus side, all those people who were embracing the market crash thread on here with their doom and gloom predictions now have something new to push their negativity on to, and yet another reason not to "do something".


    Last edited by motorguy; 18-10-2016 at 1:42 PM.
    Regards

    Paul
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 18th Oct 16, 2:35 PM
    • 1,496 Posts
    • 743 Thanks
    qwert yuiop
    I'm not a brexitist, but I'm running at about 80 % of my income in euros ( at the same prices as pre vote) so I've had a 22% pay rise. So that makes me a "boom and gloom" type.

    "I can't complain, but sometimes I still do"
    • saverbuyer
    • By saverbuyer 18th Oct 16, 2:41 PM
    • 2,320 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    saverbuyer
    Heres my top five reasons why that's not a concern.


    Firstly, this could well be a short term blip in the value of sterling, and is based purely on the fact that the market doesn't like uncertainty to bet on. They don't have some crystal ball or some remarkable insight into how the future will pan out.


    Secondly, the new car market has to remain competitive and incentivised so bumping up prices isn't particularly an option for any manufacturer, so they will try to absorb and currency fluctuations (as they are well used to doing)


    Thirdly, quite a lot of cars are built in the UK, so less likely to be impacted by currency fluctuations.


    Fourthly, generally speaking, buying a brand new car isnts a great idea for most people, so even IF - and its a very big IF - the prices of new cars goes beyond peoples reach (and that will NOT happen), then theres any amount of pre-reg, nearly new and used cars.


    Fifthly, the new car market is pretty much dominated by lease and PCP deals, so the relative price isn't hugely important to people who are looking to spend a fixed amount per month.


    Whilst there may be lots of hand wringing on forums etc about what might happen, businesses such as Mercedes, BMW, Nissan, Toyota, etc will be looking at how best they can take a competitive advantage from any short term turbulence.


    On a personal note, we've a new car on order at a confirmed fixed price, which will see us through a minimum of three years. The other two cars in the household are 12 years old, and 15 years old respectively, so neither likely to be impacted by any of this.


    When the main car is due a change, we'll find the best deal on the best car that suits our requirements and i'm not expecting any big variance.
    Originally posted by motorguy

    I was listening to Jim Rogers (Quantum Fund/Soros) on the radio the other day. He reckons parity with the dollar when Scotland takes the oil but eventual parity anyhow. Sterling has been in a downward trend since 1940 and he doesn't expect it to stop. Balance of payments problems aren't going away.


    He did say it's a good opportunity to rebalance towards export, but thinks it's too late. Interesting interview, very pro-remain as I'd expect from the BBC, but still interesting. Essentially we've been borrowing our prosperity for quite a while. He said he's go no positions in the UK at the moment...
    • qwert yuiop
    • By qwert yuiop 18th Oct 16, 2:46 PM
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    • 743 Thanks
    qwert yuiop
    Scotland takes the oil? How deluded is he?

    The Irish republic is sweating blood because 30 % of its trade is with the U.K. Scotland's trade with England is a mere 60%, and 25% is with North America. And these eejits want to go on the euro and put a border across gb? Oh and the oil industry is pretty much shut down. Nicola is trump in high heels.
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