Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • itm2
    • By itm2 8th Jan 16, 2:13 PM
    • 671Posts
    • 121Thanks
    itm2
    Typical cost of resin-bonded stone driveway?
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 16, 2:13 PM
    Typical cost of resin-bonded stone driveway? 8th Jan 16 at 2:13 PM
    The front of our townhouse currently has a badly worn and damaged paved surface, and we're thinking of replacing it with a resin-bonded stone surface. It's about 25 square metres, and we're in south west London.

    Does anyone know what sort of all-in cost we'd be looking at to have this work done?
Page 1
    • Furts
    • By Furts 8th Jan 16, 5:31 PM
    • 3,719 Posts
    • 2,342 Thanks
    Furts
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 16, 5:31 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 16, 5:31 PM
    Remember the rule of thumb before going down this route. A resin drive will not repair a damaged drive - it will only coat over the damage. In many instances the damage will come through again - but it is not possible to say when this will be.
    • TonyMMM
    • By TonyMMM 8th Jan 16, 5:35 PM
    • 2,540 Posts
    • 2,741 Thanks
    TonyMMM
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 16, 5:35 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 16, 5:35 PM
    Remember the rule of thumb before going down this route. A resin drive will not repair a damaged drive - it will only coat over the damage. In many instances the damage will come through again - but it is not possible to say when this will be.
    Originally posted by Furts
    I would agree with this - we have a resin bound driveway which we are very happy with and looks very good, but the installer spent a long time removing all the old tarmac surface and levelling & making good before the resin surface was laid.

    I would get some quotes and ask to see examples of their work and speak to previous customers.
    • itm2
    • By itm2 8th Jan 16, 6:41 PM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 16, 6:41 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 16, 6:41 PM
    Presumably they would remove all of the existing paving stones (which is the part which is damaged) and, assuming the layer underneath is sound, simply lay the new surface on top?

    Has anyone had any recent quotes for a similar job?
    • brightontraveller
    • By brightontraveller 8th Jan 16, 6:53 PM
    • 1,328 Posts
    • 516 Thanks
    brightontraveller
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 16, 6:53 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 16, 6:53 PM
    Resin bonded crap Id say 99 % are put down wrong the other 1% youll be lucky to get any descent life out of it when compared with traditional methods
    • itm2
    • By itm2 8th Jan 16, 7:19 PM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 16, 7:19 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 16, 7:19 PM
    Resin bonded crap Id say 99 % are put down wrong the other 1% youll be lucky to get any descent life out of it when compared with traditional methods
    Originally posted by brightontraveller
    Hmmm....I've seen a few "don't touch it with a bargepole" comments on t'internet, but alot of people don't seem to differentiate between resin-bound and resin-bonded. And of course a lot of people have been stitched up by cowboy builders who would probably have screwed up the job no matter what materials they had used. As is often the case, it's hard to know who/what to believe :0(
    • tired dad
    • By tired dad 8th Jan 16, 8:45 PM
    • 524 Posts
    • 174 Thanks
    tired dad
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 16, 8:45 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 16, 8:45 PM
    drive around in nice areas and keep an eye out on other peoples driveways. Get way of discovering what your spanky new driveway will look like once its worn in.

    I was up for a RBD but was put off by some old driveways that looked tatty.

    Problem with this is technology changes and maybe a new system will last longer. However, its too much money for me to take a punt
    • itm2
    • By itm2 9th Jan 16, 12:16 AM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 16, 12:16 AM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 16, 12:16 AM
    drive around in nice areas and keep an eye out on other peoples driveways. Get way of discovering what your spanky new driveway will look like once its worn in.
    Originally posted by tired dad
    Funnily enough that's how I got the idea. I keep seeing these things locally in Richmond-Upon-Thames and they look very nice.
    • JustLikeThat
    • By JustLikeThat 9th Jan 16, 9:47 AM
    • 166 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    JustLikeThat
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 16, 9:47 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 16, 9:47 AM
    We had a long drive redone last summer with resin-bound surface and it looked wonderful. A 'thin' layer of tarmac was wearing through in a few places and the workmen remove anything that was loose and bonded small gravel stones to create a firm surface. He 'trowelled' it all by hand on his knees and it took a couple of days. He said he would simply apply more thickly where the surface was uneven to create a level drive. It was about 130 sq. metres and cost nearly 5000
    However... by November we noticed a 'waviness' had started to occur along the drive. Also the join between one days work and the next became more obvious. We used Andy Nunn's company from Suffolk and he has been in business for over 20 years, so we assumed expert results. despite numerous e-mails we have not had a response yet (since early December) so we are concerned things will get worse and the waves even more pronounced.
    So,,, my message would be to make sure the under-surface is absolutely level and firm.
    • itm2
    • By itm2 9th Jan 16, 11:19 AM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    We had a long drive redone last summer with resin-bound surface and it looked wonderful. A 'thin' layer of tarmac was wearing through in a few places and the workmen remove anything that was loose and bonded small gravel stones to create a firm surface. He 'trowelled' it all by hand on his knees and it took a couple of days. He said he would simply apply more thickly where the surface was uneven to create a level drive. It was about 130 sq. metres and cost nearly 5000
    However... by November we noticed a 'waviness' had started to occur along the drive. Also the join between one days work and the next became more obvious. We used Andy Nunn's company from Suffolk and he has been in business for over 20 years, so we assumed expert results. despite numerous e-mails we have not had a response yet (since early December) so we are concerned things will get worse and the waves even more pronounced.
    So,,, my message would be to make sure the under-surface is absolutely level and firm.
    Originally posted by JustLikeThat
    Thanks for the warning. I notice that your driveway was resin bonded, rather than resin bound (in which the gravel is laid on top of the resin, as opposed to the resin bonded option which involves pre-mixing the resin and gravel and laying it as one). I'm told that resin bound surfaces are more robust, but am struggling to verify whether that's true, and if so exactly how robust.
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 9th Jan 16, 1:39 PM
    • 2,529 Posts
    • 1,706 Thanks
    EssexExile
    I've thought about this for a long time. When I lived in Essex resin bonded/bound drives were all the rage. I moved to the midlands about 15 years ago & they were unheard up here. Then a place round the corner had their drive done & I kept an eye on how it lasted. It looked great for a few years but now is starting to sink & looks quite tatty. I've also wondered how they would look if they need to be dug into for any reason & repaired.

    I've got a large area of drive & when I get fed up with weeding between the paviours it'll be tarmac for me.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • itm2
    • By itm2 9th Jan 16, 6:22 PM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    I've thought about this for a long time. When I lived in Essex resin bonded/bound drives were all the rage. I moved to the midlands about 15 years ago & they were unheard up here. Then a place round the corner had their drive done & I kept an eye on how it lasted. It looked great for a few years but now is starting to sink & looks quite tatty. I've also wondered how they would look if they need to be dug into for any reason & repaired.

    I've got a large area of drive & when I get fed up with weeding between the paviours it'll be tarmac for me.
    Originally posted by EssexExile
    Interesting....it makes me wonder whether that drive round your corner was bound, bonded, or whether they all end up the same.
    • JustLikeThat
    • By JustLikeThat 11th Jan 16, 8:50 AM
    • 166 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    JustLikeThat
    My post was misread as I started off by saying my new drive was resin-bound. I may have confused by using the word bonded to describe the gravel that was used to make sure there was no loose edges to the underlying tarmac before the resin-bound coat was applied.
    • casper_g
    • By casper_g 11th Jan 16, 10:33 AM
    • 1,048 Posts
    • 902 Thanks
    casper_g
    The Pavingexpert site is a good introduction to the terminology and different types of resin-based surfacings, and is well worth reading before speaking to potential contractors.

    The key message seems to be that a resin-bonded/resin-bound surface only provides a nice-looking wearing course and it's the concrete/asphalt etc underneath that does the work. As such it's suitable for smartening up tire-looking but sound driveways but won't work if the base is fundamentally in poor condition, cracking up, moving about etc.

    The poor reputation these materials have is almost certainly down to cowboy contractors cutting corners and/or not understanding how to achieve a durable result. Manufacturers like SureSet offer long guarantees which suggests to me that this is one area where it would be well worth using an approved installer if you want to go down this route.
    Last edited by casper_g; 11-01-2016 at 10:37 AM.
    • itm2
    • By itm2 11th Jan 16, 11:58 AM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    The Pavingexpert site is a good introduction to the terminology and different types of resin-based surfacings, and is well worth reading before speaking to potential contractors.

    The key message seems to be that a resin-bonded/resin-bound surface only provides a nice-looking wearing course and it's the concrete/asphalt etc underneath that does the work. As such it's suitable for smartening up tire-looking but sound driveways but won't work if the base is fundamentally in poor condition, cracking up, moving about etc.

    The poor reputation these materials have is almost certainly down to cowboy contractors cutting corners and/or not understanding how to achieve a durable result. Manufacturers like SureSet offer long guarantees which suggests to me that this is one area where it would be well worth using an approved installer if you want to go down this route.
    Originally posted by casper_g
    Thanks - excellent info on that PavingExpert site. I think I'll get Sureset in for a quote and advice. If it's backed by an 18 year guarantee I'd be alot more comfortable. Not expecting it to be cheap though.

    Getting back to the original question....any experience-based guesses on the cost of replacing my paved drive with resin-bonded gravel? I think the subbase is concrete, but not 100% sure.
    • mrsmartmoney
    • By mrsmartmoney 24th Apr 17, 3:34 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    mrsmartmoney
    We used a company that is now called Resin stone driveways in bournemouth and they were horrendous - they cut corners, bodged walls. we had to get another company in to dig it all up and put new resin down. The guy that owns it, Alan Constantine, doesn't care about anything apart from profits - the 6.5k we spent was money down the drain.

    We like the new surface though, but its only 12 months old so can't comment on how long it will last, looks good so far.
    • itm2
    • By itm2 24th Apr 17, 3:45 PM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    FYI for anyone shopping around, we eventually paid 2,533 for our 25 sq. metre drive, and are very pleased with it. We used the local installed recommended by Sureset, who were excellent.
    • LoeGill
    • By LoeGill 20th Jun 17, 4:23 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    LoeGill
    Can you let me know which contractor you ended up using? We are based in Kingston and as you mentioned Richmond above presume we live around the same area. Also, did you go with bound or bonded? Did the price include digging up the driveway? Our driveway is only 12m2 larger but the quotes we got back so far (not from Sureset) are about 3x what you paid.
    • itm2
    • By itm2 20th Jun 17, 9:55 PM
    • 671 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    itm2
    We used Gibson Gardens (from Twickenham). There wasn't much digging to speak of - mainly removal of the existing paving stones and preparing the existing concrete base (plus filling in a small corner which was not currently concreted). We went for resin bound.
    • Clockwood1964
    • By Clockwood1964 15th Jul 17, 8:22 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Clockwood1964
    Anyone know when the best place to buy the stone and resin materials from as I will be laying my own paths etc using this product?
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

927Posts Today

6,752Users online

Martin's Twitter