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Do students pay prescription charges? And how should students save
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# 1
carly87
Old 19-06-2007, 6:20 PM
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Smile Do students pay prescription charges? And how should students save

Hello people- I hope you can help answer my query!

I have a continual aim to become more money savvy whilst a student so I can cope a bit easier when I come out of Higher education

My question is- do students over 18 in full time education have to pay for their prescriptions?

I was talking to my boyfriend the other day, and his dentist told him about a form you can fill in and dependant on your household income, you may not have to pay for your prescriptions.

Is this true?

Last question is I am working over summer and I would like to put half my wages into a savings account, but I am not sure which saving account would be best for a student.

Thanks lots!!!!
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# 2
Meatballs
Old 19-06-2007, 6:26 PM
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Get a cash ISA (but with instant access unless you know you definitly wont need the money). Try and reach your £3000 allowance.

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# 3
Crispy Ambulance
Old 19-06-2007, 6:31 PM
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students don't get free prescriptions per se, but most will qualify on the grounds of low income. You need to get a HC1 form when you start at uni and fill that in. Your student advice centre should have some, as will your gp and dentist.
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# 4
cannylass
Old 19-06-2007, 6:41 PM
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16-19 year olds in full time education, are entitled to free prescriptions (see the back of the prescription for this info).
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# 5
carly87
Old 19-06-2007, 10:40 PM
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thanks to everyone who got back to me!

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# 6
Oldernotwiser
Old 20-06-2007, 9:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meatballs View Post
Get a cash ISA (but with instant access unless you know you definitly wont need the money). Try and reach your £3000 allowance.

Read: http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/sav...saving-account
Surely the advantage of an ISA is that you don't pay tax on it? As most students are non taxpyers, it rather negates the purpose of it for them.
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# 7
freebie_junkie
Old 20-06-2007, 10:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crispy Ambulance View Post
students don't get free prescriptions per se, but most will qualify on the grounds of low income. You need to get a HC1 form when you start at uni and fill that in. Your student advice centre should have some, as will your gp and dentist.
the threashold is very low though, im a student and also self-employed, i only made just over £4000 last year and im not entitled any more
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Last edited by freebie_junkie; 20-06-2007 at 10:44 AM.
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# 8
someone
Old 20-06-2007, 1:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldernotwiser View Post
Surely the advantage of an ISA is that you don't pay tax on it? As most students are non taxpyers, it rather negates the purpose of it for them.
Because its use it or loose it
Once you start paying tax you wont pay tax on the contributions from the years you have been adding.
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# 9
Broke Student
Old 20-06-2007, 4:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cannylass View Post
16-19 year olds in full time education, are entitled to free prescriptions (see the back of the prescription for this info).
It's 16-18 year olds who get free prescriptions (when in full time education).
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# 10
Gemmzie
Old 20-06-2007, 8:12 PM
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True when you are 19 or 20 and still in college education you still get screwed on prescription charges (even though you still qualify for child benefit and tax credits as a qualifying young person)!!
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# 11
pondie1
Old 20-06-2007, 8:20 PM
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i just applied for my daughters who are at uni,they can only say no really
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# 12
si1503
Old 21-06-2007, 1:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldernotwiser View Post
Surely the advantage of an ISA is that you don't pay tax on it? As most students are non taxpyers, it rather negates the purpose of it for them.
Maybe in the short-run, but bearing in mind that virtually all students will become taxpayers once they land a job after Uni its worth saving in an ISA even for students.
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# 13
carly87
Old 25-06-2007, 7:44 PM
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so once you have been saving in your ISA up until the beginning of the next tax year, what happens to your money? does it just sit there?

then either u can keep with same company for your next year of saving, or transfer out (whilst making sure u arent stung for doing so, or prevented by certain companies)?

is that right?
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# 14
nad1611
Old 29-06-2010, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Broke Student View Post
It's 16-18 year olds who get free prescriptions (when in full time education).

Actually the original quote from Cannylass was correct as long as a 19 year old is in full time education they will be entitled to Free prescriptions, child tax credit and child benefit. There are some forms of advanced education which do not apply though.
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# 15
atypical
Old 29-06-2010, 6:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nad1611 View Post
Actually the original quote from Cannylass was correct as long as a 19 year old is in full time education they will be entitled to Free prescriptions, child tax credit and child benefit. There are some forms of advanced education which do not apply though.
This isn't correct. The back of a prescription reads "is 16, 17 or 18 and in full-time education". Pharmacies are supposed to ask for evidence of this and if none is provided mark the back of the script. Scripts that have been marked are targeted for further checks by the PPA Fraud Investigation unit (though I'd imagine the % that are checked is very small).
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Last edited by atypical; 29-06-2010 at 7:06 PM.
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# 16
Mankysteve
Old 29-06-2010, 8:20 PM
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Unless your at welsh uni. Thank you very much welsh assembly.
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# 17
Indie Kid
Old 29-06-2010, 8:26 PM
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You can also get free prescriptions if you're on a low income.
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# 18
johnswife
Old 30-06-2010, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atypical View Post
This isn't correct. The back of a prescription reads "is 16, 17 or 18 and in full-time education". Pharmacies are supposed to ask for evidence of this and if none is provided mark the back of the script. Scripts that have been marked are targeted for further checks by the PPA Fraud Investigation unit (though I'd imagine the % that are checked is very small).

Yes, my eldest daughter was 19 last March and she has to pay for her prescriptions: ant-depressants, beta blockers, hayfever & eczema cream. We now buy the last two over the counter as it is cheaper.
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# 19
spikey123
Old 06-07-2010, 11:01 AM
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If you get a HC1 form (you can get them from doctors and post offices) be prepared for the amount of paperwork you'll need to send off. At the very least you'll need your letters from your last loan, proof of grants (I don't think you'll get the assistance if you don't qualify for the grant as this too is based on parents/partners income) and letters of bursarys you are entitled to. If you live with someone who works full time you will also need copies of 2 months worth of payslips from them.
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