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  • FIRST POST
    neocoombs
    Is it cheaper to leave heating on all the time?
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 09, 5:04 PM
    Is it cheaper to leave heating on all the time? 7th Jan 09 at 5:04 PM
    My house is freezing (3 bed, detached) I currently have heating and water on a timer, 530-730am and 330-8pm. I leave for work at 8am and get home at 4pm. I only have 4 radiators on, living room, hall way bedroom and bathroom.

    The issue, I am due to go on maternity leave in 4 weeks, new baby in house at home most of the time, will it be cheaper to leave radiators on all day and just have water on a timer or should I just use my electric haogen heater?

    Any advice much appreciated.
Page 1
  • 456789
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 09, 5:13 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 09, 5:13 PM
    Someone recently told me it is cheaper to leave heating on at a constant temp and then turn it up when required rather than turning it on and off repeatedly - so I would also be interested in what people can advise
  • Raksha
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 09, 5:35 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 09, 5:35 PM
    If your house is VERY well insulated to prevent heat loss, it may not add much to your fuel bill to leave the heating on all day.
  • Igol
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 09, 7:08 AM
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 09, 7:08 AM
    Friend of mine has started leaving the CH on all the time at 17 deg and hasnt noticed any change to the gas bill but the house itself is a lot warmer.
    There was a post last year on here, fairly certain the consensus was that it takes a lot of energy to get the house up to temp but as long as your insulated not much to keep it at a reasonable level.
  • Cardew
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 09, 8:47 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 09, 8:47 AM
    [quote=Igol;17436797]Friend of mine has started leaving the CH on all the time at 17 deg and hasnt noticed any change to the gas bill but the house itself is a lot warmer.
    There was a post last year on here, fairly certain the consensus was that it takes a lot of energy to get the house up to temp but as long as your insulated not much to keep it at a reasonable level.[/quo

    There have been literally hundreds of posts on this subject if you do a search.

    It is without doubt NOT cheaper to leave your heating on all the time.
  • nad_
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 09, 8:51 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 09, 8:51 AM
    yeh but if you can afford solar panel or wind turbine then it will effect you bill and i know its expencive at start but its for life time and i will recon it if its your own home
  • nc73
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 09, 11:31 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 09, 11:31 AM
    my heat never shuts off unless i do so manually. so how is leaving it on going to reduce costs?
  • gemz20
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 09, 11:40 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 09, 11:40 AM
    i have a room thermostat that shuts the heating off when it gets to a certain heat and if temperture drops the heating automatically comes on without me having to keep switching on and off
  • Mike1961
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 09, 8:59 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 09, 8:59 PM
    Leaving the heating on as a way to save cost is a fallacy. The only place your house heat goes ultimately is in heat losses to the outside - everything you put in when you buy gas, electricity, oil etc ends up as heat losses (laws of thermodynamics - conservation of energy) The rate of this heat loss is directly proportional to the difference between outside temperature and inside temperature. The hotter your house the more energy you loose - the higher your bills. So if your house is being heater when you don't need it - guess what, you are wasting money. But the problem is if your heating system is not powerful enough to bring it up to temperature from cool when you need it (ie over the period of time of your occupancy) you may need to have the system running longer than really needed to keep it comfortable.
  • vikingaero
    It all depends on the ambient outside temp.

    For instance Mrs Viking likes the house at 21/22 degrees which is like living in an oven. :rolleyes:

    At night mostly turn the thermostat down. When the temp drops at night it takes about an hour of constant boiler activity in the morning to raise the room temp from 17 deg to 21/22 deg.

    If I leave the thermostat on 20deg then the boiler lights on average about once an hour for 5-10 minutes so there isn't much in it. Our house is a new build with very good insulation, thick cavity double glazing and we have thermal blinds and thermal curtains on all windows.
  • puddy
    i think it must depend on the type of property you have, im in a top floor flat, although i have no one either side of me, but i suspect i must have some heat from below coming up. my front door is in a hallway, not on the outside of the property and i have full double glazing.

    if i get up, say today, very late about 1pm, the flat felt freezing because i usually have windows open even in the winter and the timer on the heating had gone off at 6am as per my timer. so i put the heating on and within about half hour, the whole flat is warm enough for me to have kicked me slippers off because my feet were hot. i had closed the windows by now. the suns now gone down, so i can feel the temperature dropping, which means i may put the fire on later for about 20 mins to warm the room through. i dont have a thermostat so i dont know what the actual temp is
  • neocoombs
    Thank you all for your comments - it seems everyone has mixed feelings. I am doing an experiment with my heating. I have taken meter readings at a certain time, left them on the timer for 2 days and then taken the end meter reading. Then doing the same thing but leaving the radiators on a constant temp all day, so will let you know how much extra it cost...
  • Raksha
    I'm sorry neocoombs, this won't work, especially with the change in outside temp we've had recently (well here in Bucks anyway). You need to compare like with like, if the two days you left the heating on all day were warmer than the two days you left it on timer, then you may well get a figure showing there wasn't much difference. But on a much colder day, the heat left in the house would 'flood' out because of the temp difference between inside and out.

    Mike 1961, you didn't study an OU course T102 did you?
  • battelaxe
    Leaving the heating on as a way to save cost is a fallacy. The only place your house heat goes ultimately is in heat losses to the outside - everything you put in when you buy gas, electricity, oil etc ends up as heat losses (laws of thermodynamics - conservation of energy) The rate of this heat loss is directly proportional to the difference between outside temperature and inside temperature. The hotter your house the more energy you loose - the higher your bills. So if your house is being heater when you don't need it - guess what, you are wasting money. But the problem is if your heating system is not powerful enough to bring it up to temperature from cool when you need it (ie over the period of time of your occupancy) you may need to have the system running longer than really needed to keep it comfortable.
    Originally posted by Mike1961
    1. The heat still escapes whether you have the heating on or off.
    2. Your house will cool at a constant rate to a temperature in line with the outside temperature.


    So, if your house loses heat whether the heating is on or off, the question is how much will it cost to regain the "lost heat" when the system is off, or to maintain the heat when the system is on?

    The test of leaving it on or off for 2 days is a good idea, so long as the outside temperatures are not too variable... I am also awaiting a definitive reply to this. Has it been done yet?

    If so can you post it here...

    And please can we not confuse this issue with one of turning down the thermostat by 1 degree.
  • KimYeovil
    If your house is VERY well insulated to prevent heat loss, it may not add much to your fuel bill to leave the heating on all day.
    Originally posted by Raksha
    But it can also add to your bill when it is warmer. Many households with someone at home during the day will find it cheaper than those who have no-one at home because you can take advantage of daytime heat and leave your house open to warm up. Airing the house removes damp as well as providing warmth.

    Of course, this is more important for unheated houses when it is cold - an insulated unheated home will be damper and colder than a dry fresh air day. Or something like that. I think.
  • Cardew
    1. The heat still escapes whether you have the heating on or off.
    2. Your house will cool at a constant rate to a temperature in line with the outside temperature.


    So, if your house loses heat whether the heating is on or off, the question is how much will it cost to regain the "lost heat" when the system is off, or to maintain the heat when the system is on?

    The test of leaving it on or off for 2 days is a good idea, so long as the outside temperatures are not too variable... I am also awaiting a definitive reply to this. Has it been done yet?

    If so can you post it here...

    And please can we not confuse this issue with one of turning down the thermostat by 1 degree.
    Originally posted by battelaxe
    It is most definitely not cheaper to have the heating or hot water on constantly, rather than on a timer.

    That is not an opinion, it is a fact, supported by the Laws of Physics. The Energy Saving Trust specifically states:

    Is it more economical to leave my heating on 24hrs in the winter?



    Answer

    No. It is a common misconception that it is cheaper to leave your hot water and heating on all the time. Boilers use more power initially to heat water from cold, however the cost of this is greatly exceeded by the cost of keeping the boiler running all of the time.
    The best solution is to programme your heating system so that it comes on when you need it most (possibly early morning and in the evening), and goes off when you don't need it (when you are out of the house or asleep). There are a range of controls that can be used and your heating engineer will be able to provide you with the most appropriate solution.
    Depending on your circumstances it may be necessary to keep the heating on all day during winter but it will cost more than if you turn the heating off when you don't need it.




    So regardless of the temperature you set on your boiler, on your room thermostat or TRVs(thermostatic radiator valves) it will always be cheaper to have heating on a timer rather than leave it on constantly. That is after all why we have timers on CH systems!

    Taking the urban myth theory(that heating on constantly is cheaper) to the extreme, if you go away for several weeks in the winter you should leave your heating on constantly at the temperature you normally set.

    Obviously nobody would do that, as turning off your heating for several weeks will clearly save money. However it is exactly the same principle in turning it off for a few hours – it saves money.
  • magyar
    yeh but if you can afford solar panel or wind turbine then it will effect you bill and i know its expencive at start but its for life time and i will recon it if its your own home
    Originally posted by nad_
    No it isn't. Small solar panels and wind turbines don't pay for themselves at all.
    Says James, in my opinion, there's nothing in this world
    Beats a '52 Vincent and a red headed girl
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