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  • FIRST POST
    • nirajn123
    • By nirajn123 10th Jun 19, 12:03 PM
    • 162Posts
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    nirajn123
    Underfloor Heating - Type of flooring
    • #1
    • 10th Jun 19, 12:03 PM
    Underfloor Heating - Type of flooring 10th Jun 19 at 12:03 PM
    Hello,

    While we are some way off from actually starting the project, we are quite keen on UFH in our next extension. From what I read so far, tiles are best suited to UFH.

    My question though is for the period when heating is not used regularly in the house - say May to Oct, does this make the floors much colder to walk on (compared to laminate/wood)?
Page 1
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 10th Jun 19, 5:59 PM
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    theonlywayisup
    • #2
    • 10th Jun 19, 5:59 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Jun 19, 5:59 PM
    I am not really sure what you are asking.

    We have UFH on limestone. The limestone is no colder than than it would be without heating during the months we don't have it on.
    • nirajn123
    • By nirajn123 11th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    • 162 Posts
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    nirajn123
    • #3
    • 11th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    I am asking about using tiles in comparison of laminate or engineered wood and experience people have during summer months - while winter would be comfortable with WFH, but does it mean colder than usual floors when its not on.
    • Rodders53
    • By Rodders53 11th Jun 19, 2:07 PM
    • 748 Posts
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    Rodders53
    • #4
    • 11th Jun 19, 2:07 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jun 19, 2:07 PM
    I'd never choose to fit UFH having lived with it in our current house for nearly three years. *

    Uncontrollable. Takes a very long time to heat up and then pumps heat out when you don't want/need it.

    Yes floor tiles are cold in summer (quite nice sometimes) - but also can get pretty warm in the sun (solar gain). Engineered wood is slightly more comfortable to walk on, but also stops UFH from escaping as quickly into the room.

    But the rooms with wood on top of UFH are nicer to walk on in winter and summer in my view.

    BUT remember the floor should be: substrate over a damp proof membrane supporting: insulation (lots of it), the UFH pipework, a concrete screed to act as storage heater, the visible flooring on top. The floor should be at ambient temperature within a few degrees, more or less all the time.

    * To be frank I don't think the heating designers/installers knew what they were doing when this house was built; and hence the whole system works poorly (using oil fired boiler and rads upstairs).
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 12th Jun 19, 4:01 AM
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    theonlywayisup
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 19, 4:01 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 19, 4:01 AM
    I'd never choose to fit UFH having lived with it in our current house for nearly three years. *

    Uncontrollable. Takes a very long time to heat up and then pumps heat out when you don't want/need it.

    Yes floor tiles are cold in summer (quite nice sometimes) - but also can get pretty warm in the sun (solar gain). Engineered wood is slightly more comfortable to walk on, but also stops UFH from escaping as quickly into the room.

    But the rooms with wood on top of UFH are nicer to walk on in winter and summer in my view.

    BUT remember the floor should be: substrate over a damp proof membrane supporting: insulation (lots of it), the UFH pipework, a concrete screed to act as storage heater, the visible flooring on top. The floor should be at ambient temperature within a few degrees, more or less all the time.

    * To be frank I don't think the heating designers/installers knew what they were doing when this house was built; and hence the whole system works poorly (using oil fired boiler and rads upstairs).
    Originally posted by Rodders53
    Our experience is probably the polar opposite. We've had it for 14 years in this property.

    We have wall plates in each room that control that room as a zone. A bit like thermostats but not ugly! - you set the zone temperature and forget about it.

    The heat is ambient and I've never experienced it "pumping out". To be honest, the house is a great temperature day/night/winter/summer and I don't even realise the heating is on/off.

    Our limestone isn't cold as such, it's very well insulated and seems to be at body heat (if that's a clear way to explain it). I don't even notice the warmth/cool other than at the UFH manifold which is in a cupboard - I'm guessing the cupboard helps store the heat and it does feel warm in there - not surprising when its the point where every single pipe feeds back in/out of the system.

    To add, if you are going to use a tile/solid floor then make sure your screed is dry and use something like a ditra matting under the tile.

    We installed our own, we converted the barn and I can say it's something I could/would not want to live without. No radiators is a liberating thing when it comes to room design!
    • pattypan4
    • By pattypan4 12th Jun 19, 6:12 AM
    • 314 Posts
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    pattypan4
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 19, 6:12 AM
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 19, 6:12 AM
    I love my UFH, wet system, new build house of good construction. Quickstep on top and rads upstairs. Zoned areas. I set the thermostats to a lower ambient temperature 24/7 with increased heat during the day and evening. It will not come on when the heat is not called by the thermostat but the time taken to heat the zones will be much less if needed because there will not be a large jump in temperature. No rads downstairs and cosy house, what not to like
    • bluewater
    • By bluewater 14th Jun 19, 7:18 AM
    • 122 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    bluewater
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 19, 7:18 AM
    UFH and Tiles
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 19, 7:18 AM
    Which floor covering do you prefer? If your extension is a kitchen then tiles are obviously an option. And are you considering ufh as the primary heating source for the extension or will you have radiators?
    I have electric ufh heating under tiles and would not consider a tile floor without it in future. Tiles are freezing in winter and electric ufh set to about 21 or 22 degrees makes them comfortable. For a kitchen you could also use LVT (Luxury Vinyl Tiles) with ufh and it can also be fitted under engineered wood, laminate and carpet.

    With adequate primary heating from radiators say, floor covering other than tiles should be comfortable without ufh. But for tiles I would definitely recommend it.

    I assume you are thinking of electric ufh rather than a wet system.
    A wet system is much more expensive to install and probably not as controllable.
    • ritesh
    • By ritesh 15th Jun 19, 1:18 AM
    • 358 Posts
    • 120 Thanks
    ritesh
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 19, 1:18 AM
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 19, 1:18 AM
    We had a wet system UFH fitted when we did our kitchen extension 14 years ago with large porcelain tiles on top. Best thing we ever did! It is on its own thermostat and set at ambient temperature. So whilst we do not have it pumping out a stupid amount of heat it makes walking on the tiles very comfortable. There is one cold spot near the garden door and when your foot touches it you can really feel the difference. In fact I don't think we have ever changed the thermostat temperature once we found the ideal setting 14 years ago.
    Last edited by ritesh; 15-06-2019 at 1:22 AM.
    "I think I spent 72.75% of my life last year in the office. I need a new job!!"
    • southcoastrgi
    • By southcoastrgi 15th Jun 19, 10:44 AM
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    southcoastrgi
    • #9
    • 15th Jun 19, 10:44 AM
    • #9
    • 15th Jun 19, 10:44 AM
    There are really only two important points to remember, all flooring & adhesive must be suitable for a contact temp of upto 40įc & should have a tog rating of less than 1.0 but never more than 2.5
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
    • Rodders53
    • By Rodders53 15th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
    • 748 Posts
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    Rodders53
    Our experience is probably the polar opposite. We've had it for 14 years in this property.
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    You missed the bit where I said it was a poorly designed/installed system then?

    I gave my experience as a warning to the OP. Getting UFH design/installs right is not a simple matter from what I've read (and know).
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 7th Jul 19, 4:06 PM
    • 1,270 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    aj9648
    Sorry to bring this thread up again but I’m looking at wet UFH system for our extension in the kitchen and living area. This maybe a silly question but do you still need rads if you have UFH. We are hoping to put down a seamless resin flooring or karndean LVT flooring down.

    Thanks ��
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 7th Jul 19, 4:19 PM
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    theonlywayisup
    You missed the bit where I said it was a poorly designed/installed system then?

    I gave my experience as a warning to the OP. Getting UFH design/installs right is not a simple matter from what I've read (and know).
    Originally posted by Rodders53
    I merely said ours was the polar opposite experience. We installed ours ourselves - and in our holiday cottages - so from what I've done, I can say that it is a simple matter....

    Sorry to bring this thread up again but I’m looking at wet UFH system for our extension in the kitchen and living area. This maybe a silly question but do you still need rads if you have UFH. We are hoping to put down a seamless resin flooring or karndean LVT flooring down.

    Thanks ��
    Originally posted by aj9648
    The whole point of UFH is that it is under the floor. Do you want rads too? We have rads (ladder rads in bathrooms and ensuites) but no you don't need them and we merely have the ladders as towel warmers.

    Can your extension be serviced from it's own boiler or will it need a new one?
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 7th Jul 19, 4:29 PM
    • 1,270 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    aj9648
    I merely said ours was the polar opposite experience. We installed ours ourselves - and in our holiday cottages - so from what I've done, I can say that it is a simple matter....



    The whole point of UFH is that it is under the floor. Do you want rads too? We have rads (ladder rads in bathrooms and ensuites) but no you don't need them and we merely have the ladders as towel warmers.

    Can your extension be serviced from it's own boiler or will it need a new one?
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    It will be served by the current boiler
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 7th Jul 19, 4:35 PM
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    theonlywayisup
    It will be served by the current boiler
    Originally posted by aj9648
    Then you need to think how you will get it to the extension. Is a new extension yet to be built or a current one?

    UFH manifolds look ugly and consist of a lot of pipes feeding from the boiler.

    Is the extension one room or more, single storey or more? Sorry don't mean to be asking so many questions but it's difficult to understand what you have/don't have and any issues that may occur. Our barn and cottages were all complete renovations - therefore easy to plan as far as the UFH was concerned.
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 7th Jul 19, 4:54 PM
    • 1,270 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    aj9648
    Then you need to think how you will get it to the extension. Is a new extension yet to be built or a current one?

    UFH manifolds look ugly and consist of a lot of pipes feeding from the boiler.

    Is the extension one room or more, single storey or more? Sorry don't mean to be asking so many questions but it's difficult to understand what you have/don't have and any issues that may occur. Our barn and cottages were all complete renovations - therefore easy to plan as far as the UFH was concerned.
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    Itís a new extension still to be built. Was due to start next month but now pushed back to 2020. Itís a single storey extension serving kitchen and extended living area. I canít remember the square footage which I guess would be more helpful!!
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 7th Jul 19, 5:01 PM
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    theonlywayisup
    No square footage isn't relevant for me! What you need to work out is how you get the UFH serviced from your current boiler location to the new extension. Are they in close proximity, the boiler and the extension?
    • southcoastrgi
    • By southcoastrgi 7th Jul 19, 5:52 PM
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    southcoastrgi
    There are only two pipes required from the boiler to the manifold, this manifold would ideally be situated centrally to the rooms being connected to it, you need to get a drawing showing the rooms & sizes & the boiler & manifold position & give this to your installer so he can get it sent off to whichever ufh company you are thinking of using
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
    • southcoastrgi
    • By southcoastrgi 7th Jul 19, 5:56 PM
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    southcoastrgi
    No square footage isn't relevant for me!
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    It might not be relevant for you but it certainly is one of the most important things for working out the layout & costings
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 7th Jul 19, 6:41 PM
    • 13,703 Posts
    • 9,439 Thanks
    theonlywayisup
    It might not be relevant for you but it certainly is one of the most important things for working out the layout & costings
    Originally posted by southcoastrgi
    As maybe, but I don't know the ins and outs of working out the layout for this extension or the cost, so that's why my comment was thus.
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