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    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
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    ska lover
    Schools providing Sanitary protection
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
    Schools providing Sanitary protection 14th Sep 18 at 10:24 PM
    I am reading currently about 'Period Poverty' in the UK..the sixth richest country in the world, allegedly, although you wouldn't know it

    Is it right that some Schools are now providing sanitary protection?

    You can buy Tesco everyday essentials pads for 0.23p

    Don't get me wrong, I am far from poverty bashing as I have been in some awful situations in the past.....all I am seeing is people bashing this as how can parents not afford 23 pence but we all know circumstances change

    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it

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    Last edited by MSE Andrea; Yesterday at 10:21 AM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
Page 1
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Sep 18, 10:35 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:35 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:35 PM
    Of course its right, you don't let children suffer for their parents' failures!

    And if girls are missing school because they haven't got protection that's bad for everybody, the country needs its young people educated.
    • calleyw
    • By calleyw 14th Sep 18, 10:53 PM
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    calleyw
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:53 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:53 PM
    My local town council is asking for donation of either cash or toiletries as some young people at school in my local area, are lacking the basics such as toothpaste, toothbrush and shower gel as well as sanitary items for the girls.


    I know aldi shower gels for men are about 49p for the lynx a like one. They also have a what they call the family shower gel for 33p.


    I am aware that some areas don't have a lidl or Aldi.


    Shocking really


    Yours


    Calley x
    Hope for everything and expect nothing!!!

    Good enough is almost always good enough -Prof Barry Schwartz

    If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try -Seth Godin
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 14th Sep 18, 11:20 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 18, 11:20 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 18, 11:20 PM
    I am reading currently about 'Period Poverty' in the UK..the sixth richest country in the world, allegedly, although you wouldn't know it

    Is it right that some Schools are now providing sanitary protection?

    You can buy Tesco everyday essentials pads for 0.23p

    Don't get me wrong, I am far from poverty bashing as I have been in some awful situations in the past.....all I am seeing is people bashing this as how can parents not afford 23 pence but we all know circumstances change

    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it
    Originally posted by ska lover
    Yes, there are some cheap ones - but if I wanted to buy them, it would cost me 6 in bus fares to get to the nearest Tesco large enough to sell the cheapie ranges (assuming they actually had them in stock).

    In addition, in London, children don't have cash for bus fares (and most places would see them using bus passes), most school operate cashless systems for meals and, if they don't have a Saturday job (unlikely in these times of zero hour contracts for adults and illegal for anybody until up to 4 years after a first period, a child is less likely to have cash of their own to spend on them - particularly if money is tight at home.


    It makes perfect sense to just provide the things for free, as it means they aren't seen as the ones the 'poor' girls have to use, nobody has to be embarrassed about coming on and using bundles of toilet roll and, to be honest, with Universal Credit screw ups and the aforementioned ZHCs, I don't give two hoots whether a kid takes enough to supply themselves, their sisters and their mum or not - which is one of the 'reasons' why it's supposed to be a bad idea in some people's minds.


    I've had times where I've been so broke that it's been the final straw to come on. And on one notable occasion, I had to dip into work's petty cash to buy some, as my salary had been delayed by my boss going on holiday for 3 weeks - he hadn't thought to mention to me in advance that this meant he wouldn't pay me until he came back.

    Once I found out about menstrual cups, the reason I bought one was for nothing other than 'this means I don't have to buy anything else again'.


    It's a good idea for all girls to have immediate access to free sanitary protection - for hygiene, as it means they can be changed frequently - for convenience, as girls' periods tend to be irregular and unpredictable - and because no girl should be trying to bodge together a pad out of multiple sheets of toilet roll in the school loos and hoping that it doesn't fall out.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 14th Sep 18, 11:23 PM
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    Loanranger
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 18, 11:23 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 18, 11:23 PM
    I wonder what child benefit is for if not for this?
    • Ames
    • By Ames 14th Sep 18, 11:50 PM
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    Ames
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 18, 11:50 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 18, 11:50 PM
    I wonder what child benefit is for if not for this?
    Originally posted by Loanranger
    Back in the real world though, what's better - spend a relatively small amount of money on providing sanpro for the daughters of useless parents, or see them missing school?

    Although I do worry that all these schemes to make up for poor parenting (free school meals, talk of providing meals in school holidays, providing sanpro) will enable children to hide the fact that their home lives are chaotic, and mean families don't get the help and support that they need.

    It's great to provide practical help, but there needs to be emotional support too.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 15th Sep 18, 12:35 AM
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    ska lover
    • #7
    • 15th Sep 18, 12:35 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Sep 18, 12:35 AM

    Although I do worry that all these schemes to make up for poor parenting (free school meals, talk of providing meals in school holidays, providing sanpro) .
    Originally posted by Ames
    Or is it enabling bad parenting? ''One less thing for us to worry about as the School will sort it''

    This is what i am reading as in ''over helping'' where people just stop trying to help themselves and become reliant on help
    Last edited by ska lover; 15-09-2018 at 12:43 AM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 15th Sep 18, 12:39 AM
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    ska lover
    • #8
    • 15th Sep 18, 12:39 AM
    • #8
    • 15th Sep 18, 12:39 AM
    Yes, there are some cheap ones - but if I wanted to buy them, it would cost me 6 in bus fares to get to the nearest Tesco large enough to sell the cheapie ranges (assuming they actually had them in stock).
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Hmmm interesting point..What area do you live in? Tescos do evening deliveries for 1 in my area.

    I love home shopping deliveries, so much cheaper than driving there, picking, packing and the two hour of my life and for a quid, can't really beat it

    Might be cheaper to look into home shopping. It is an idea if no one has thought of it. I mean no one would spend 6 bus fare to buy something for 29pence and then only purchase only enough to carry home on a bus..... and if they would, then sorry but some people are actually beyond helping as common sense has lost it's way big time

    Common sense is free. Surely if a person had 6 to spend, and only wanted STs they would buy local for 2 and save 4...Or get them thrown in at 29pence wit a weeks shopping and spend One Pound to get the whole lot delivered

    one fab thing about having it delivered is you can chose substitutes and if they have't got the cheapo brand in stock, you will get subbed with better
    Last edited by ska lover; 15-09-2018 at 12:45 AM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 15th Sep 18, 4:31 AM
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    badmemory
    • #9
    • 15th Sep 18, 4:31 AM
    • #9
    • 15th Sep 18, 4:31 AM
    Well there is a far less acceptable way for teens to get free sanitary protection (& I don't mean to get pregnant although that would be an answer). Go on the pill (I think it is still a free prescription) & don't stop taking it, it's highly unlikely a doctor would even notice the early re-order. It doesn't always work unfortunately. It did for my sister but not for me.


    We should not punish young girls for the failures of their parents. I know what period poverty feels like. Ever gone to school with old towelling nappies pinned to your knickers? I have & it is not nice. At least it was an all girls school & they were used to helping me safetypin the back of my skirt so the blood stains wouldn't show on my way home. That is the reality of period poverty!



    It was also not nice that although I was skinny at 13 I was wearing my mothers cast off bras despite my bust already being bigger than her's. I had to go on strike to get those too. There's nothing quite like a classmate coming up to you after a gym lesson & saying I didn't realise your bust was that big, why aren't you wearing a bra?


    I was very lucky in that I was never ever bullied for any of this but it was a very long time ago. It would have been so much worse in a mixed school.


    I couldn't have bought my own sanitary protection because I didn't have any money to & I was then & still am honest so wasn't going to steal it.


    So if they are suffering period poverty it isn't the only thing which is a problem
    Last edited by badmemory; 15-09-2018 at 8:19 AM.
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 15th Sep 18, 6:17 AM
    • 5,712 Posts
    • 26,268 Thanks
    thorsoak
    I am reading currently about 'Period Poverty' in the UK..the sixth richest country in the world, allegedly, although you wouldn't know it

    Is it right that some Schools are now providing sanitary protection?

    You can buy Tesco everyday essentials pads for 0.23p

    Don't get me wrong, I am far from poverty bashing as I have been in some awful situations in the past.....all I am seeing is people bashing this as how can parents not afford 23 pence but we all know circumstances change

    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it
    Originally posted by ska lover
    Sadly, there are still far too many families where girls still go through what you went through - and still not enough families where sanitary protection for women and girls is considered an essential.

    But no girls should still be going through what you - and so many others - did. That's why I welcome the idea of schools providing protection as freely as they do loo roll.
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 15th Sep 18, 8:21 AM
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    Fireflyaway
    In the town where I work a small charity has been set up with the sole purpose of making free sanitary protection available due to so Many girls missing school.
    I understand there are times when people fall in hard times and we should support them, but as a community worker I've seen many people make poor choices or look to others to fulfill their responsibilities. Families who claim free school meals but the parents will be wearing designed trainers and sunglasses. School is a place of education not a feeding station. When I was a kid we all took sandwiches. Even the less well off kids managed to bring a pack lunch but now parents see lunch at school as an entitlement. Ive known of people to go food banks because they spent all their money on the sky bill or they smoke 40 a day. If there is free stuff people will always abuse it. Free protection will mean some parents will be of the mindsets of why should I buy it if I can get it for free. I think people need to be encouraged to be more self sufficient.
    Having said this if a girl doesn't have protection I'd say that's neglect on the part of her parents. It's a basic need. So how can you offer free protection to girls in need without it becoming another freebie that people with the wrong priorities will just come to expect? It's tricky! I'd hate to see any girl to without protection but what about kids with poor dental hygiene? Babies with rashes because their nappies are not changed enough? Should we provide free toothbrushes and nappies as well? I believe we need a culture change. A stronger work ethic and less reliance on the state. Let's always help those who really need support but stop wasting money on providing things that people should be sorting out for themselves because it becomes an expectation.
    Last edited by Fireflyaway; 15-09-2018 at 8:28 AM. Reason: T
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 15th Sep 18, 8:36 AM
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    badmemory
    They are providing free toothbrushes & paste in some areas I believe. Yes the parents should be providing but how much can we punish the children for the parent's inadequacies?
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 15th Sep 18, 8:58 AM
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    kingfisherblue
    About a month ago. a woman in my area became a coordinator for the Red Box Project. She has asked on our local FB groups for sanitary protection and for businesses to become drop off points. It has been well received in our area. She regularly posts to thank people for their donations, and puts up photos of what she has collected, and from which collection point. A few days ago, she posted a list of secondary schools that now have a Red Box.



    This is an easy way for people to help of they want to.Several local businesses are happy to have a red plastic crate in their building, and they are also receiving free advertising via the FB page. There are cafes, florists, beauty salons, and a car repair place, all easily accessible for members of the public to pop a packet in.


    http://redboxproject.org/
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 15th Sep 18, 9:24 AM
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    peachyprice
    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it
    Originally posted by ska lover
    I can relate to this. My mother was far from useless in most others areas and we were far from poor, but she just didn't 'think' to make sure sanpro was always available. She had a hysterectomy at 32, before my periods started so sanpro wasn't on her radar, for some reason she just didn't seem to notice my cycle. Like you I was embarrassed to ask and also i'll admit to being less than organised and would often forget I was due so often had to improvise.

    I do think 'period poverty' isn't just down to finances, it's down to crap parenting and if the recent ads actually make parents who aren't actually poor, just crap, think to pop a pack in the shopping trolley it will have been a worthwhile campaign.

    I have a daughter, as a result of my experience I buy far too many tampons for her, she has to tell me to stop because her drawer is full. I also have bags hanging in the bathrooms with various types inside in case her friends or other female visitors need anything. I's become a bit of an obsession, I hate the thought of any girl going without.

    And times have changed, my daughter would never be embarrassed to ask if she ran out, I also made my sons fully aware about sanpro, so hopefully one day if they are dads their daughters won't be embarrassed to ask them to buy them.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • PrettyKittyKat
    • By PrettyKittyKat 15th Sep 18, 9:28 AM
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    PrettyKittyKat
    Sadly for some parents even if they had all the money in the world providing their children with the necessities isn't a priority of theirs, or is seen as a form of control. And then as you say for some money issues mean they aren't able to - they may not even realise their child needs them. Children are very perceptive and many will know when their family is struggling with money so may not even tell their parent that they have come on as they know that this is an additional expense to their parent.

    I am all for this idea I think it is brilliant for many reasons. It also isn't something new, it has just been formalised. I left school 16 years ago but i distinctly remember that we were regularly reminded how several of the female teachers had sanitary products available for free if we needed one at any time. I have no idea if they bought them with their own money or schools money at the time, but I wouldn't be surprised if many teachers over the years have used their own money to buy supplies.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 15th Sep 18, 9:33 AM
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    Red-Squirrel
    Hmmm interesting point..What area do you live in? Tescos do evening deliveries for 1 in my area.
    Originally posted by ska lover
    Isn't there like a 50 minimum spend?
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 15th Sep 18, 9:39 AM
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    culpepper
    My own early periods were awful due to the lack of sanitary products. I was actually lucky enough that mum gave me a pack of ten but they were woefully insufficient for the job. There was no opportunity to be absent during those times though. I generally managed to wangle a day here and there by just telling fibs to either stay home or get out of games at the very least.
    I was in my 40s before I discovered cloth towels. Made from fleece and toweling and press studs. Home made of course . Why can there not be a lesson at school in which the girls are shown how to make some themselves and the materials be there if they cannot provide them?. They last for years and you just pop them in a washer or wash them in the basin at home if you dont have a machine. The washing of them could be explained too in simple terms without adding any pointless bumph about sterilising tablets or brands of detergent.
    There could aslo be free 'moon cup' type devices for girls who find they can use one as they are very liberating.
    • mattpaint
    • By mattpaint 15th Sep 18, 10:29 AM
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    mattpaint
    Only the truly monstrous would be against this. Simple.
    • WibblyGirly
    • By WibblyGirly 15th Sep 18, 10:43 AM
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    WibblyGirly
    I wonder how many packs of cheap 23p sanpro you'd go through in comparison to Always. As a teenager, having periods can be awfully embarrassing and awkward, especially at school. My cycle was heavy, irregular and lasted 6 day! I'm glad my mum always had enough stuff in so I could use it but I do remember it being cheap stuff and not feeling very comfortable. I think the 23p ones are a false economy and the girls should be provided with a better brand.
    • Rosemary7391
    • By Rosemary7391 15th Sep 18, 11:04 AM
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    Rosemary7391
    Only the truly monstrous would be against this. Simple.
    Originally posted by mattpaint

    It's not simple though. Nothing is! We're in danger of conflating many different problems:
    • Parents can't afford to buy protection
    • Parents won't buy it
    • Parents don't realise and daughters are too embarrassed to ask
    Each has different causes, and different problems that come along with it or afterwards. The last one in particular I think we should tackle head on and get people to talk more about it.



    I wonder how many packs of cheap 23p sanpro you'd go through in comparison to Always. As a teenager, having periods can be awfully embarrassing and awkward, especially at school. My cycle was heavy, irregular and lasted 6 day! I'm glad my mum always had enough stuff in so I could use it but I do remember it being cheap stuff and not feeling very comfortable. I think the 23p ones are a false economy and the girls should be provided with a better brand.
    Originally posted by WibblyGirly

    That varies a lot. Supermarket own brand were fine for me especially for the last couple of days. If we're really about efficiency we could teach them about reuseable options - I have a mooncup and its brilliant !
    Slinkies 2018 Challenge - 0/80lb lost
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