Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 6th Aug 18, 7:54 PM
    • 47Posts
    • 11Thanks
    twotonealex
    Help me choose a Global Fund?
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 18, 7:54 PM
    Help me choose a Global Fund? 6th Aug 18 at 7:54 PM
    Evening All,

    Following many of your contributions to my previous thread, where I looked to gain opinions on whether I should reduce my Fever Tree holding, it was kindly pointed out that even though my intentions were in a good place, I was stupid to spread around £3500 (not including fever tree) across multiple tech, asia & emerging markets funds, based on the size of the amounts and the cost of the fees!

    I have, for the moment, decided to keep my holding in Fever Tree, however this is something I will reduce in the near future.

    From reading various threads, and a few suggestions, I'm looking at consolidating these funds (now I've requested the sale via HL) into a Global Fund, equity was suggested.

    I've listed a few I've looked into below, but looking to see if anyone has any alternative suggestions or any feedback on any?

    Architas Birthstar 2046-50
    Baillie Gifford Global Alpha Growth
    Black Rock Consensus 100
    Black Rock Consensus 85
    Black Rock Consensus 60
    HSBC Global Strategy Balanced Portfolio
    Vanguard Life Strategy 80% equity
    Vanguard Life Strategy 60% equity

    I'm 27, the purpose of this SIPP is to play a small part in bridging the 10 year gap between my desired retirement age of 55, and the drawing age of 65 of my CS Alpha pension.

    I have seen a lot of talk of the VLS funds above. I overall want as good all round growth as possible, anything anyone can suggest is appreciated.

    Please keep it constructive, I don't profess to be a master of any of this, I'm just trying to build on the 33.01% growth I've had in the last 12 months and future proof it with something a bit more sensible.

    Thanks for any help you can provide!
    Alex
Page 1
    • bostonerimus
    • By bostonerimus 6th Aug 18, 7:59 PM
    • 2,130 Posts
    • 1,448 Thanks
    bostonerimus
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 18, 7:59 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 18, 7:59 PM
    Do you want an active or indexing approach, answer that and you'll reduce your choices.
    Misanthrope in search of similar for mutual loathing
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 6th Aug 18, 8:08 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    twotonealex
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 18, 8:08 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 18, 8:08 PM
    Thanks Bostonerimus.

    I understand the difference (correct me if I'm wrong), index tracks the various indexes, active is actively managed to try and keep ahead/on the curve.

    The problem is I don't know what is more beneficial to me/pros VS cons.
    • A_T
    • By A_T 6th Aug 18, 8:22 PM
    • 503 Posts
    • 331 Thanks
    A_T
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 18, 8:22 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 18, 8:22 PM
    What about Vanguard Target Retirement 2045 Fund?
    • BLB53
    • By BLB53 6th Aug 18, 9:04 PM
    • 1,347 Posts
    • 1,124 Thanks
    BLB53
    • #5
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:04 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:04 PM
    Looking longer term I would suggest have a look at Scottish Mortgage Trust on the basis it has done well for me over past few years and I expect outperformance to continue.

    For more detail, here's a recent report from DIY Investor
    http://diyinvestoruk.blogspot.com/2018/05/scottish-mortgage-full-year-results.html
    If you choose index funds you can never outperform the market.
    If you choose managed funds there's a high probability you will underperform index funds.
    • Audaxer
    • By Audaxer 6th Aug 18, 9:09 PM
    • 1,232 Posts
    • 738 Thanks
    Audaxer
    • #6
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:09 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:09 PM
    The funds you have listed have various risk profiles as some are 60% equities and some around 100% equities. You need to decide how much risk/volatility to want or are able to cope with before deciding on the fund.
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 6th Aug 18, 9:23 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    twotonealex
    • #7
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:23 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:23 PM
    I'm open to either 60% or 80% rather than 100%. Thanks!
    • Alexland
    • By Alexland 6th Aug 18, 9:54 PM
    • 3,013 Posts
    • 2,349 Thanks
    Alexland
    • #8
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:54 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:54 PM
    I'm open to either 60% or 80% rather than 100%. Thanks!
    Originally posted by twotonealex
    Ask yourself what is the maximum likey paper loss you can tollerate seeing during a crash? 25%, 40% or 50%+?

    Alex
    • si2winit
    • By si2winit 6th Aug 18, 9:56 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    si2winit
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:56 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:56 PM
    I have about 60% of my fund in blackrock long term class 8 fund. Being seeing about 10% growth a year.

    Also have 40% in blackrock excluding UK fund (moved this a few years back with the Scottish independence referendum on the horizon. Itís made about 13% growth each year and I have left it as is.
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 7th Aug 18, 6:34 AM
    • 47 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    twotonealex
    Ask yourself what is the maximum likey paper loss you can tollerate seeing during a crash? 25%, 40% or 50%+?

    Alex
    Originally posted by Alexland
    I guess 40%? I'm looking for a fund to see me through the next decade (obviously I'll change when required).

    40% is the sweet spot.

    Thanks,
    Alex
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 7th Aug 18, 7:48 AM
    • 1,455 Posts
    • 1,437 Thanks
    Lungboy
    Maybe look at things like Vanguard FTSE global all cap, or the hsbc and fidelity equivalents.
    • Alexland
    • By Alexland 7th Aug 18, 12:35 PM
    • 3,013 Posts
    • 2,349 Thanks
    Alexland
    40% is the sweet spot.
    Originally posted by twotonealex
    In which case something with about 80pc equities exposure might suit you. If you are on HL then probably the discounted Blackrock Consensus 85. Or move to Vanguard Investor and maybe VLS80 for slightly lower fees. But then HL currently have an exit charge so do the maths on the payback period...

    Alex
    Last edited by Alexland; 07-08-2018 at 12:38 PM.
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 7th Aug 18, 2:18 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    twotonealex
    Thanks Alex!

    I've noted 22.93% of Consensus 85 is invested in Black Rock UK equities. Is it leaving me open to higher risk with Brexit?

    Thanks for your help,
    Alex
    • bostonerimus
    • By bostonerimus 7th Aug 18, 2:24 PM
    • 2,130 Posts
    • 1,448 Thanks
    bostonerimus
    I guess 40%? I'm looking for a fund to see me through the next decade (obviously I'll change when required).

    40% is the sweet spot.

    Thanks,
    Alex
    Originally posted by twotonealex
    So rather than a Global equity fund you want a multi-asset fund with global equities inside it. You say you want one with 60% equities. So knock off all the funds from your list that don't meet those criteria and choose from what's left. It probably won't make much difference what you choose.
    Misanthrope in search of similar for mutual loathing
    • WeWereOnABreak
    • By WeWereOnABreak 7th Aug 18, 2:36 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    WeWereOnABreak
    So rather than a Global equity fund you want a multi-asset fund with global equities inside it. You say you want one with 60% equities. So knock off all the funds from your list that don't meet those criteria and choose from what's left. It probably won't make much difference what you choose.
    Originally posted by bostonerimus
    Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but is the Vanguard LS100 counted as a multi asset fund? Or is it more accurate to say it is a global equities fund, and only the other levels count as multi asset?
    • ruthcain1
    • By ruthcain1 7th Aug 18, 3:29 PM
    • 27 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    ruthcain1
    No advice to give but watching replies on here with interest. I have some equities in Latin American and Asian (excl Japan) funds which appear to be underperforming and also have quite a complex portfolio for an inexperienced person, so could do with a good global fund recommendation to get me through the rough times I suspect are coming for UK employees.
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 7th Aug 18, 3:34 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    twotonealex
    How does Architas 2046-50 fund compare to the other funds listed above?
    herehttps://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/fund-discounts,-prices--and--factsheets/search-results/a/architas-birthstar-target-date-2046-50class-r-accumulation&ved=2ahUKEwje5vKK7tbcAhXIxoUKHVmRBVcQ FjACegQIBxAB&usg=AOvVaw0ipMVBmyfguZFbHg1YMEFA
    • twotonealex
    • By twotonealex 7th Aug 18, 4:47 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    twotonealex
    Architas 2046-50 Fund above, has the below top 10, with excellent growth similar to the other global funds posted in the previous posts:


    BlackRock iShares North American Equity Index Class L 27.61%
    BlackRock iShares UK Equity Index Class L 23.16%
    BlackRock iShares Continental European Equity Index Class L 9.55%
    BlackRock iShares Emerging Markets Equity Index Class L 8.72%
    BlackRock iShares Global Property Securities Equity Index Class L 8.23%
    Vanguard Global Small-Cap Index - 6.40%
    BlackRock iShares Japan Equity Index Class L 4.78%
    BlackRock iShares Pacific ex Japan Equity Index Class L 2.38%
    Vanguard U.K. Inflation-Linked Gilt Index Gross 2.01%
    UBS ETF CMCI Composite SF UCITS ETF (USD) A-acc - 1.94%
    • Rollinghome
    • By Rollinghome 7th Aug 18, 4:53 PM
    • 2,117 Posts
    • 2,301 Thanks
    Rollinghome
    Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but is the Vanguard LS100 counted as a multi asset fund? Or is it more accurate to say it is a global equities fund, and only the other levels count as multi asset?
    Originally posted by WeWereOnABreak
    Not a dumb question if you don't know. It aims to be 100% invested in global equites by holding a portfolio of Vanguard passive funds - with the option of holding some equities directly. So as it holds just a single "asset class", equities, it's not "multi-asset" as are the other LS funds, but a global equity fund of funds.
    • Alexland
    • By Alexland 7th Aug 18, 5:05 PM
    • 3,013 Posts
    • 2,349 Thanks
    Alexland
    Yes it's part of a multi asset series but don't let definitions distract your thinking the most important thing is you know what's in it. These fund series do tend to have a UK bias (UK global cap weighting is nearer 5%) to appeal to UK investors.

    Given such a high percentage of UK company earnings are generated overseas its not as UK heavy as it looks but if you want one with more of a market cap weighting (ie probably more USA) look at the HSBC All World (for 100% equities inc emerging markets) or HSBC Global Strategy mixed asset fund series.

    Alex
    Last edited by Alexland; 07-08-2018 at 5:10 PM.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

35Posts Today

4,323Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Ta ta... for now. This August, as I try and do every few yrs, I'm lucky enough to be taking a sabbatical. No work,? https://t.co/Xx4R3eLhFG

  • RT @lethalbrignull: @MartinSLewis I've been sitting here for a good while trying to decide my answer to this, feeling grateful for living i?

  • Early days but currently it's exactly 50 50 in liberality v democracy, with younger people more liberal, older more? https://t.co/YwJr4izuIj

  • Follow Martin