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  • FIRST POST
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 12:22 PM
    • 283Posts
    • 118Thanks
    RealGem
    Cooker Not Working. Cheapest Way To Diagnose?
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 18, 12:22 PM
    Cooker Not Working. Cheapest Way To Diagnose? 6th Aug 18 at 12:22 PM
    Hi, I live in a council flat, and my cooker stopped working yesterday.

    This does coincide with me cleaning the top of the cooker, and water remaining on for a while, whilst it soaked up the burnt-on muck. I didn't think this would damage the cooker, as they are designed to allow pans to boil over. But now it seems a strange coincidence that it stopped working straight after I cleaned it. No water went went down the back, as it has a panel on the back.

    And it was off at the mains when I cleaned it.

    Nothing works. It does not have a clock or digital display, but none of the parts work; none of the rings or either of the two ovens, and the two ovens' switch/knob lights don't come on.

    Nothing on the fuse board apears to have been tripped. I did turn all the switches in the electric cupboard off and back on again, but it didn't work.

    I don't know where the fuse is on a cooker. That would be the first thing I'd try, but all the online searches have taken me to complicated websites.

    This person had a similar issue to me:

    https://www.mybuilder.com/questions/v/17208/cooker-switch-or-cooker-not-working

    and when he called his social housing landlord, they said they would charge him a callout fee if it turned out to be the cooker that was faulty.

    So if that is the case with my council, would a call out fee be cheaper than getting a private electrician to diagnose it?

    I don't fancy using a device that tells you if the electricity is working. I hear you have to be experienced to use those or you can cause damage.

    I just want to know the cheapest way of getting a diagnosis please.

    Thank you
    Last edited by RealGem; 06-08-2018 at 12:26 PM.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
Page 1
    • Farway
    • By Farway 6th Aug 18, 3:12 PM
    • 6,393 Posts
    • 10,493 Thanks
    Farway
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:12 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:12 PM
    Is you cooker permanently hard wired in, or does it have a plug into a wall socket?
    I'm guessing hard wired in as you mention 2 ovens

    Can it be pulled out? Try and see where the main supply cable form the cooker goes, it will probably go to a cooker connection unit. If it does, is there a switch there that has been knocked into off position perhaps



    Connection unit looks something like this
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/crabtree-2-gang-45a-dp-cooker-switch-13a-dp-switched-socket-white/63376
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 3:36 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    RealGem
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:36 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:36 PM
    Is you cooker permanently hard wired in, or does it have a plug into a wall socket?
    I'm guessing hard wired in as you mention 2 ovens

    Can it be pulled out? Try and see where the main supply cable form the cooker goes, it will probably go to a cooker connection unit. If it does, is there a switch there that has been knocked into off position perhaps

    Connection unit looks something like this
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/crabtree-2-gang-45a-dp-cooker-switch-13a-dp-switched-socket-white/63376
    Originally posted by Farway

    Hi, yes thanks, it is hard wired into the wall.

    I wired the cooker in myself when I moved in, after my Dad told me to make sure the big red switch is off - it's much like a 3 pin plug - just bigger!

    The two large and small electric switches are like that link, but separate from each other.

    The big red switch is over the worktop, so I always turn that off when the cooker is not in use.

    Do you know where the cooker's own fuse is please?

    thanks
    Last edited by RealGem; 06-08-2018 at 3:39 PM.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
    • robin58
    • By robin58 6th Aug 18, 3:49 PM
    • 2,548 Posts
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    robin58
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:49 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:49 PM
    I would also check the wiring in the socket. Could have come lose over time. wire could have expanded enough to losen it.

    Could also be a faulty switch. Switches do fail after awhile if they are switched on and off many times.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
    The more I see, the more I know.
    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
    • Farway
    • By Farway 6th Aug 18, 3:50 PM
    • 6,393 Posts
    • 10,493 Thanks
    Farway
    • #5
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:50 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Aug 18, 3:50 PM
    I don't know where cooker fuse is, you would need to post make & model to enable it to be looked up.

    I'm not sure cookers even have an internal fuse, but make & model should enable a Google search
    • grumpycrab
    • By grumpycrab 6th Aug 18, 4:09 PM
    • 3,646 Posts
    • 1,749 Thanks
    grumpycrab
    • #6
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:09 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:09 PM
    Nothing on the fuse board apears to have been tripped. I did turn all the switches in the electric cupboard off and back on again, but it didn't work.
    Originally posted by RealGem
    I'm not an electrician BUT you really need to know which fuse on the board corresponds to your cooker AND check its off when you do any work.
    If you put your general location in your Profile, somebody here may be able to come and help you.
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 6th Aug 18, 4:11 PM
    • 2,349 Posts
    • 3,167 Thanks
    Robisere
    • #7
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:11 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:11 PM
    When you wired up the cooker, did you strip the socket faceplate to access the wiring? Did you spot a fuse? Usually that's where the fuse is.
    I think this job really needs
    a much bigger hammer.
    • D_M_E
    • By D_M_E 6th Aug 18, 4:37 PM
    • 1,675 Posts
    • 63,789 Thanks
    D_M_E
    • #8
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:37 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:37 PM
    If you have a gas boiler, make sure it's correctly powered down and turned off before you do this:

    Go back to the mains incoming fuseboard - if it's more modern will be a switchboard - turn off the mains switch then pull out all the fuses or turn off every switch, depending on your board.

    If fuses, examine every one then put them back where they come from if they look as if there's no broken wire, then turn on the mains switch.

    If switches, turn on the mains switch then turn on each switch one by one.

    Don't think the cooker itself has an internal fuse but could be wrong.
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 4:58 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    RealGem
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:58 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 18, 4:58 PM
    I don't know where cooker fuse is, you would need to post make & model to enable it to be looked up.

    I'm not sure cookers even have an internal fuse, but make & model should enable a Google search
    Originally posted by Farway
    Thanks it's a Tricity Bendix Double Oven 4862W which I cannot find online at all. The model number is only written on the back in marker pen! The ink on the official sticker is worn off.

    The nearest cooker I can find online that looks like mine is the Tricity Bendix SE402

    I downloaded a manual for this and it only mentions a fuse on a circuit board.


    I'm not an electrician BUT you really need to know which fuse on the board corresponds to your cooker AND check its off when you do any work.
    Originally posted by grumpycrab
    Thanks, it clearly says Cooker, so I will make sure it's off.




    When you wired up the cooker, did you strip the socket faceplate to access the wiring? Did you spot a fuse? Usually that's where the fuse is.
    Originally posted by Robisere
    I will have another look, thanks.


    If you have a gas boiler, make sure it's correctly powered down and turned off before you do this:

    Go back to the mains incoming fuseboard - if it's more modern will be a switchboard - turn off the mains switch then pull out all the fuses or turn off every switch, depending on your board.

    If fuses, examine every one then put them back where they come from if they look as if there's no broken wire, then turn on the mains switch.

    If switches, turn on the mains switch then turn on each switch one by one.

    Don't think the cooker itself has an internal fuse but could be wrong.
    Originally posted by D_M_E
    Thanks,

    The switch on the circuit board says Cooker - I only just noticed. I will try and look at the wiring and the Terminal Block, whilst the boiler and breaker switch is off.


    Thanks everyone.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 6:43 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    RealGem
    No fuse in the socket or big red switch, and both seem fine.

    I will try the Terminal Block tomorrow, as it's low down on the cooker and my back is killing me.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
    • macman
    • By macman 6th Aug 18, 9:49 PM
    • 42,249 Posts
    • 17,642 Thanks
    macman
    Have you looked at your consumer unit to determine which circuit the cooker is on? A hard wired cooker will normally have it's own dedicated radial circuit, and the fuse or MCB should be marked as such.
    Your symptoms indicate that no power is reaching the cooker. If you don't know how to continuity test or test for power at the cooker connection unit safely, using a multimeter, then get a sparky or white goods engineer in, because you are potentially dealing with a 32A circuit here.
    Last edited by macman; 06-08-2018 at 9:52 PM.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • that
    • By that 6th Aug 18, 10:20 PM
    • 393 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    that
    do you have a multimeter, reading light, or bedside light? if so turn it on and remove the plug so the wires are exposed, or just use a multimeter.

    On the 2nd picture from the bottom of http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/how-to/electrics/fitting-an-electric-oven connect the two wires if the lamp across the brown and blue wires (or red and black) and turn on the power a the lamp should glow indicating it is your oven that is the problem. Of it does not glow it is your electrics
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 10:35 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    RealGem
    do you have a multimeter, reading light, or bedside light? if so turn it on and remove the plug so the wires are exposed, or just use a multimeter.

    On the 2nd picture from the bottom of http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/how-to/electrics/fitting-an-electric-oven connect the two wires if the lamp across the brown and blue wires (or red and black) and turn on the power a the lamp should glow indicating it is your oven that is the problem. Of it does not glow it is your electrics
    Originally posted by that

    Sorry I don't understand what you mean. When I clicked the link, I expected to see a pic of the cooker's socket on the wall. But it's a pic of the cooker itself. I don't understand how connecting a lamp's wire to a cooker will work. The cooker has no power, so how can it light a lamp?

    If you mean conect the lamp to the wall socket, won't it be too much power?! Sorry if I'm a bit dense!


    UPDATE:
    I've read it again and that page seems to be for a cooker that has power, but the oven is not working. My cooker has no power at all, thanks.
    Last edited by RealGem; 06-08-2018 at 10:47 PM.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 10:42 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    RealGem
    Have you looked at your consumer unit to determine which circuit the cooker is on? A hard wired cooker will normally have it's own dedicated radial circuit, and the fuse or MCB should be marked as such.
    Your symptoms indicate that no power is reaching the cooker. If you don't know how to continuity test or test for power at the cooker connection unit safely, using a multimeter, then get a sparky or white goods engineer in, because you are potentially dealing with a 32A circuit here.
    Originally posted by macman
    It has its own switch named COOKER in the electric cupboard. The switch wasn't tripped which I would expect it to, if the fuse was blown. I switched it off and on again. It didn't work. It's modern and doesn't appear to have a fuse attached, so I don't understand how I can change or test the fuse.

    I don't fancy doing multimeters on my own. I can see they don't cost much, but I watched half a dozen YouTube videos and they all give contradicting advice. I will have to phone the council and ask how much the call out fee will be. It might be cheaper for their sparky to diagnose it, than for me to get a private one out.

    Or my cooker could be fine, and it might be the electricity supply that's faulty, in which case they'll fix it.
    Last edited by RealGem; 06-08-2018 at 11:15 PM.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
    • that
    • By that 6th Aug 18, 11:20 PM
    • 393 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    that
    From reading the post, no one here knows if there is electricity going to the cooker or not, and I want to determine this.

    Sorry I don't understand what you mean. When I clicked the link, I expected to see a pic of the cooker's socket on the wall. But it's a pic of the cooker itself. I don't understand how connecting a lamp's wire to a cooker will work. The cooker has no power, so how can it light a lamp?
    Originally posted by RealGem
    That page was for picture purpose only.

    If you mean conect the lamp to the wall socket, won't it be too much power?! Sorry if I'm a bit dense!
    Your cooker can draw up to about 32A and that lamp will draw not even 0.5A which makes its power usage insignificant and will not overload anything


    in the picture above (and yours will be very similar) keep all the wires in situ, but across the blue wire add one wire from the light (they normally screw down), and add the other light bulb wire to the brown. make sure that the blue wire only touches its screw and only lamp wire - same for brown. Switch on the mains at the fuse box. if the light glows then you obviously have power going to the oven.

    this is the same as plugging in a lamp to a wall socket. if the lamp glows then there is power. in this case there is no socket, just this time the wires going to the back of the cooker which is powered from a cable, instead of a wall socket

    here is a 402 manual, but will probably be of no help https://manualzz.com/doc/3553996/tricity-bendix-se402-user-s-manual
    Last edited by that; 06-08-2018 at 11:28 PM.
    • RealGem
    • By RealGem 6th Aug 18, 11:36 PM
    • 283 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    RealGem
    @That, I said in my original post:
    "Nothing works. It does not have a clock or digital display, but none of the parts work; none of the rings or either of the two ovens, and the two ovens' switch/knob lights don't come on."

    Thank you for your tip. I will try it tomorrow and let you know if it works. Fingers crossed.
    People only get upset
    when their expectations are not met.
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