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  • FIRST POST
    • SavvySaver24
    • By SavvySaver24 12th Jul 18, 8:09 PM
    • 94Posts
    • 18Thanks
    SavvySaver24
    Changing the locks....
    • #1
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:09 PM
    Changing the locks.... 12th Jul 18 at 8:09 PM
    Myself and my Partner are buying our first house (eeek excited!!). We said our first in would be to change the locks. Both sets of parents looked at us as if we were nuts and said they have NEVER changed the locks in ANY of their houses.

    Is this a wasted expense no one usually bothers with!?
Page 1
    • mije1983
    • By mije1983 12th Jul 18, 8:13 PM
    • 3,542 Posts
    • 20,278 Thanks
    mije1983
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:13 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:13 PM
    And I suppose they also looked at you like you were nuts when you said you were going to keep the back door locked when you go out, as they never did

    But seriously, for the small cost it is when compared to the price of the house, I would always do it as well. I like the fact I know exactly who has the keys to my house.

    • kinger101
    • By kinger101 12th Jul 18, 8:25 PM
    • 4,489 Posts
    • 6,228 Thanks
    kinger101
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:25 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:25 PM
    It's a good idea. Change them to anti-bump and anti-drill locks. You can get them keyed alike as well (i.e., one key for all locks).

    It can be done DIY (instructional videos on Youtube).
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 12th Jul 18, 8:42 PM
    • 3,602 Posts
    • 9,636 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:42 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:42 PM
    I never have and it!!!8217;s never given me a moment!!!8217;s worry, some people think it!!!8217;s crazy not to. Up to you where you fall on that continuum!
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 12th Jul 18, 8:46 PM
    • 4,692 Posts
    • 5,264 Thanks
    robatwork
    • #5
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:46 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:46 PM
    Is this a wasted expense no one usually bothers with!?
    Originally posted by SavvySaver24
    The way I look at it is this. Previous residents may have had a cleaner or given the keys to a child or visitor. More may have been cut. Anyone in the world may now have your keys and know where the house is that they fit. That's about 7.5 billion people.

    I prefer to fit my own lock so that only 4 people have my keys and know what house they fit.

    Basic maths.
    • nic_c
    • By nic_c 12th Jul 18, 8:54 PM
    • 1,842 Posts
    • 962 Thanks
    nic_c
    • #6
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:54 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:54 PM
    I did, but only a year after moving in, when I found out about the "bradford technique" where you can break in silently via lock on upvc doors in matter of seconds (A friend found out the hard way - in & out whilst they were awake upstairs!!). My locks were probably 20+ years old as assume they were unchanged since the doors were fitted. I got some 3-star barrels with matched keys, so can use the same key for all external doors, and I fitted them in minutes.

    There is no need, and my wife looked at me strangely when I wanted to do it as lots of other use for the money, but if its a worry, then do it.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 12th Jul 18, 9:00 PM
    • 9,076 Posts
    • 9,670 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #7
    • 12th Jul 18, 9:00 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jul 18, 9:00 PM
    Both sets of parents looked at us as if we were nuts and said they have NEVER changed the locks in ANY of their houses.
    Originally posted by SavvySaver24
    I never have. I wouldn't say you were nuts, but it seems rather unlikely that local scrotes are going around with massive jangly bundles of spare keys. Almost all burglaries gain access by (a) brute force or (b) doors/windows not being locked at all.

    But if it gives you peace of mind (and perhaps a chance to upgrade the locks) it's relatively cheap and simple.
    • Daniorerio
    • By Daniorerio 12th Jul 18, 10:01 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Daniorerio
    • #8
    • 12th Jul 18, 10:01 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jul 18, 10:01 PM
    When I moved into my new flat I heard the doorbell while I was in the bathroom - i was in no hurry but next thing I know the previous owner was letting themselves in to !!!8220;see if I was settling in ok!!!8221;!

    Changed the locks the same day following YouTube videos - if nothing else its a useful DIY skill to have ticked off that doesn!!!8217;t cost the earth. Next time your partner loses their keys it!!!8217;s money saved changing the locks! (And if you change the locks then it!!!8217;s worth doing now!)
    • SavvySaver24
    • By SavvySaver24 12th Jul 18, 10:11 PM
    • 94 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    SavvySaver24
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 18, 10:11 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 18, 10:11 PM
    Can anyone give me a ball park on costs? We have a front door, side door, and french windows.
    • StumpyPumpy
    • By StumpyPumpy 12th Jul 18, 10:20 PM
    • 1,304 Posts
    • 3,542 Thanks
    StumpyPumpy
    I changed the locks on the first day - really easy job to do yourself if you have euro locks, not difficult with Yales etc...

    Was it a waste of money? Maybe, but about 2 months after moving in someone posted a key through the letter box. Most likely the previous owner who had found a spare and was trying to do a good deed by returning it. Bur who knows how many copies are out there with the cleaners, pet/baby sitters and relatives of the previous owners. When you consider how much you spend buying a new house, 30 on a couple of locks really doesn't register.

    SP
    Come on people, it's not difficult: lose means to be unable to find, loose means not being fixed in place. So if you have a hole in your pocket you might lose your loose change.
    • Daniorerio
    • By Daniorerio 12th Jul 18, 10:22 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Daniorerio
    I think I paid ~20 for a lock a tB&Q, maybe cheaper if you look around or depend on the lock (?) but I was completely new to my area when I moved in so went where i knew!
    • todayisagreatday
    • By todayisagreatday 12th Jul 18, 11:08 PM
    • 172 Posts
    • 124 Thanks
    todayisagreatday
    We did. The vendor did our viewing accompanied by his son (as he didn't drive). The son had been doing work around the garden etc and totally creeped us out. Clearly an alcoholic as in both viewings he had drunk driven, the sheds had enough empty Stella cans to fill a skip from 'a couple of pints whilst gaedening' and he made a couple of sexual innuendo remarks to us both. We were batsh*t scared the son was going to come round after we moved in. Also get the alarm code changed too.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 12th Jul 18, 11:18 PM
    • 5,996 Posts
    • 3,634 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    One of the selling points I guess of our house, were we ever to sell it, is a secure front bike shed - the house is close enough to commute into the city in 30 minutes on bike or ride to a train station 3/4 of a mile away. I can get a replacement key cut only with relevant security checks with the manufacturer and could easily, were I that way inclined, have a copy made, sell the house and then help myself in a week or so to whatever they stored.



    Of course I'd change the locks, only takes one muppet losing a keyring with the address on it (lent to the pet sitter or whatever) and anyone can be in. Peace of mind in knowing only you have the keys is invaluable
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 12th Jul 18, 11:38 PM
    • 11,070 Posts
    • 14,617 Thanks
    hazyjo
    Never have, always say I definitely will.

    One of those questions only you yourself can answer. Really can't see how it matters what anyone else does. I would advise changing them, but don't practice what I preach!
    2018 wins: Single Malt Whisky; theatre tickets; festival tickets; year of gin(!); shoes; Thai cooking stuff; Jo Brand talk; Slime Factory; Flawless tickets; Comedy night tickets
    • Marvel1
    • By Marvel1 13th Jul 18, 6:06 AM
    • 3,641 Posts
    • 3,981 Thanks
    Marvel1
    I did it for mine.
    • SavvySaver24
    • By SavvySaver24 13th Jul 18, 6:40 AM
    • 94 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    SavvySaver24
    Appreciate you can buy cheap locks but in terms of getting a locksmith to fit them how much are we talking?
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Jul 18, 7:16 AM
    • 17,135 Posts
    • 47,370 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    No big deal to pay the cost of having a locksmith in even to change the locks. My 3 (back door, front door, boiler room door) were being changed by a locksmith for me literally the day I moved in here.

    Seem to recall it was less than 100 for the 3 of them and his labour.

    I wouldnt dream of not changing the locks.

    Out of interest someone else may recall/like to give a link to a recent thread on here where a family came back to find the boyfriend/husband of last owner in the house having a right rant at them etc - as he'd been away and she'd sold the house behind his back.

    We've also heard about previous owners coming back to retrieve belongings they left in the house - ie the new owner knew they were now theirs - but the PO had come along/let themselves in/stolen them.

    Who knows what may happen all round if locks havent been changed on a house - as others have said we all tend to give spare keys to various people at different points and any one of them could have had a spare key cut that we don't know about.
    Never doubt that a small group of people can change the world. It's the only thing that ever has.

    Extinction Rebellion
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Jul 18, 8:02 AM
    • 26,669 Posts
    • 96,103 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Some of us live in places where doors are rarely locked. Sadly, I think that's probably changing.

    There was one house burglary in our village last year; the first for many years, but it was opportunists from outside the area, which meant they were recognised as suspicious by locals. Lurk here, and you'll be noticed and quite probably spoken to. These guys cleared off after only one theft, but it was one too many.

    A good pair of neighbour's eyes + a brain that cares enough is still a useful addition to whatever security devices people have.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 13-07-2018 at 9:06 AM. Reason: added detail
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 13th Jul 18, 8:07 AM
    • 8,125 Posts
    • 17,589 Thanks
    kingfisherblue
    I advised my daughter and son-in-law to change the locks on their house when they bought it four years ago. Two days ago, a chap turned up wanting his belongings. He said that he was the previous owner (everything was dealt with via an agent, so my daughter and SiL didn't meet the previous owners). He had obviously been drinking, and another neighbour lower down had already contacted the police because of anti-social behaviour.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 13th Jul 18, 8:10 AM
    • 5,587 Posts
    • 26,244 Thanks
    Slinky
    We didn't bother, but we're renting the house out at the moment. When we get it back to move in ourselves, we'll do it then.
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