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  • FIRST POST
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 7th Jul 18, 9:23 AM
    • 7,639Posts
    • 4,261Thanks
    buglawton
    Technology that you avoid
    • #1
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:23 AM
    Technology that you avoid 7th Jul 18 at 9:23 AM
    I have a list of things Ive so far intuitively dodged. The list might shorten 10 years after the manufacturers show they truly understand the issues.

    My list

    Smart meters
    Keyless cars
    Smart home control
    Smart TVs (streaming boxes are fine)
    Phones without earphone socket
    Solar panels

    Anyone else got a list?
Page 1
    • Cornucopia
    • By Cornucopia 7th Jul 18, 9:28 AM
    • 10,701 Posts
    • 10,989 Thanks
    Cornucopia
    • #2
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:28 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:28 AM
    Similar to yours...

    Smart Meters
    Solar Panels
    Facebook
    Twitter
    Banking apps on mobile devices

    But, I have a "keyless" car that works impeccably, and a Smart TV, ditto. I do apply manual locking to the car if I leave it for a long period, though (just a precaution).

    I'm interested in Home Automation generally, but the only thing I presently have is a home-made intelligent timer switch that has a calendar of sunset times for switching on a lamp at the correct time. (That works well, too). I have some bits & pieces to do more, but just haven't got around to it.

    I suppose the thing is that I don't believe in technology simply for its own sake, or because it's "cool". It has to address a genuine need and it has to do it without introducing additional problems or being hard to use.
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 07-07-2018 at 9:33 AM.
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    • john22
    • By john22 7th Jul 18, 10:20 AM
    • 617 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    john22
    • #3
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:20 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:20 AM
    I dont avoid anything if I have a need for it and I can afford it I get it. The only caveat will be if its a technology thats made by a company that I have a feeling will not support it properly then I would not buy it.
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 7th Jul 18, 10:30 AM
    • 4,195 Posts
    • 5,828 Thanks
    Nick_C
    • #4
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:30 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:30 AM
    I avoid electricity, the internal combustion engine, and the Internet.

    Don't trust these new fangled inventions.
    • Spidernick
    • By Spidernick 7th Jul 18, 10:41 AM
    • 2,896 Posts
    • 5,663 Thanks
    Spidernick
    • #5
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:41 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Jul 18, 10:41 AM
    Beware of toasters trying to take over the world!
    'I want to die peacefully in my sleep, like my father. Not screaming and terrified like his passengers.' (Bob Monkhouse).

    Sky? Believe in better.

    Note: win, draw or lose (not 'loose' - opposite of tight!)
    • GunJack
    • By GunJack 7th Jul 18, 11:16 AM
    • 10,352 Posts
    • 7,753 Thanks
    GunJack
    • #6
    • 7th Jul 18, 11:16 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Jul 18, 11:16 AM
    I don't believe in technology simply for its own sake, or because it's "cool". It has to address a genuine need and it has to do it without introducing additional problems or being hard to use.
    Originally posted by Cornucopia
    This, in a nutshell....

    It's long been a bugbear of mine that tech has a major tendency to be over-used by the general populous at the behest of the companies that want to profit from it, with the added bonus (for the companies) that when this tech breaks down, it costs an arm and a leg to fix it - cars being the typical example of this.

    In most cases, this over-use leads to the "dumbing-down" of many many aspects of life, and then we wonder why the general standard of intelligence seems to be rapidly diminishing....

    ...and I'm a techie!!

    rant over.....
    ......Gettin' There, Wherever There is......
    • Neil Jones
    • By Neil Jones 7th Jul 18, 11:36 AM
    • 1,466 Posts
    • 887 Thanks
    Neil Jones
    • #7
    • 7th Jul 18, 11:36 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Jul 18, 11:36 AM
    Used effectively, technology is great and it has given us lots of really good stuff that we now take for granted such as mobile phones (for call purposes), the internet and satellite TV.

    However as useful as mobile phones are, the number of people I see who are staring at their phone while crossing a road is scary, particularly when its obvious they haven't looked before crossing...

    I don't jump on technology as soon as it comes out, I usually wait until either its matured or I have a need for it, not necessarily a want. I mean when my TV dies it will probably be replaced with a Smart TV but I wouldn't go out of my way to buy a Smart TV just because they are available to buy.
    • john22
    • By john22 7th Jul 18, 11:43 AM
    • 617 Posts
    • 454 Thanks
    john22
    • #8
    • 7th Jul 18, 11:43 AM
    • #8
    • 7th Jul 18, 11:43 AM
    Used effectively, technology is great and it has given us lots of really good stuff that we now take for granted such as mobile phones (for call purposes), the internet and satellite TV.

    However as useful as mobile phones are, the number of people I see who are staring at their phone while crossing a road is scary, particularly when its obvious they haven't looked before crossing...

    I don't jump on technology as soon as it comes out, I usually wait until either its matured or I have a need for it, not necessarily a want. I mean when my TV dies it will probably be replaced with a Smart TV but I wouldn't go out of my way to buy a Smart TV just because they are available to buy.
    Originally posted by Neil Jones
    I remember seeing an article recently about when the Sony Walkman came out and some states in America banned people for using them when crossing the street. You could get 15 days in jail for using them.

    We have to guard against becoming old and set in our ways when new tech arrives. If people use it then there is a benefit plus it keeps pushing things forward.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 7th Jul 18, 12:00 PM
    • 20,954 Posts
    • 16,737 Thanks
    agrinnall
    • #9
    • 7th Jul 18, 12:00 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jul 18, 12:00 PM
    I have more than half of the things in your list without any significant issue (although the smart meter has become rather less smart since switching supplier). The other things I don't have because I don't need them at the moment, but if I do feel they would be useful in the future I wouldn't worry about getting them, after doing my due diligence on the selected product.
    • RumRat
    • By RumRat 7th Jul 18, 12:12 PM
    • 2,893 Posts
    • 1,691 Thanks
    RumRat
    I usually buy Tech as it comes, mainly useful stuff. I quite like browsing Kickstarter and have benefited from some early release tech.
    If people didn't do this, then you probably wouldn't have some of the more innovative stuff and wouldn't have the opportunity to wait for it to 'mature'.
    I must admit that sometimes it's a pure want as opposed to a need.
    I have automation in the home (lights, TV, heating).
    My car is full of tech and surprisingly, I've used it all.
    My TV has all the latest features and standards.
    I use contactless payments via a ring or my phone.
    All my music is streamed on demand to wherever I want it. (Probably one of the best advancements yet). As are any Movies etc.
    I have a flagship phone, which I got at a discount, and it will last me two years, by which time I'll have saved enough for another. It will then be passed on to younger relatives.
    Not sure why you would necessarily avoid a phone without a headphone jack. I have one in mine but use Bluetooth earphones, so it's never used.
    I would like to add that I only indulge in what I can afford and save into my 'Tech fund' on a regular basis..
    It has backfired on occasions....I bought a Windows phone and still think it's the best phone OS. My Nokia is still hanging in there, with minimal support, as an emergency phone/sat nav...
    As the thread is actually about what we avoid.....I don't have a smart meter, as it offers me no advantages and it's really bugging the supplier that I don't/won't have one.
    Drinking Rum before 10am makes you
    A PIRATE
    Not an Alcoholic...!
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 7th Jul 18, 12:31 PM
    • 1,781 Posts
    • 2,728 Thanks
    coffeehound
    Even for the adverts for voice-controlled assistants they apparently can't think of a practical use. I prefer to be about a decade behind the cutting edge and wait for the early adopters to pay for the beta testing.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 7th Jul 18, 12:35 PM
    • 8,056 Posts
    • 24,550 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    OhThankHeaven - I'm not the only person to absolutely Not Trust
    Smart meters & Smart home control. (I mean, hello, Security, anyone?! I love the house in Eureka but that's Fantasy.)

    Listed building so not allowed solar panels & anyway, Lancashire. (This current blip is just that.)

    I avoid Twitter, in part because while I can see it's useful, I can also see other people making right idiots of themselves - cofeve anyone?

    If I could get rid of headphones, I might. My children are functionally deaf preferring their soundtrack to the family one...

    I love tech, but I trust it within a very tight radius. If a thing is smart enough to chat online without me, it's smarter than I trust. (The offspring are different.)

    When I get too old & fragile to be allowed to live solo, I may have to share with all sorts of digital things & up to a point I'm OK with that so long as I know where the Off Switches are, and can use them.
    I don't mind the kettle telling an enquiring child that I brewed at 5.40 this morning, but I'd rather only the family & the emergency services could get answers to that info, not anyone with internet access.

    If anyone does decide to build a companion for the elderly but awkward, I'll have a Big Hero 6 thank you. I like hugs.
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 7th Jul 18, 1:13 PM
    • 4,565 Posts
    • 10,446 Thanks
    onomatopoeia99
    I have a list of things Ive so far intuitively dodged. The list might shorten 10 years after the manufacturers show they truly understand the issues.

    My list

    Smart meters
    Keyless cars
    Smart home control
    Smart TVs (streaming boxes are fine)
    Phones without earphone socket
    Solar panels

    Anyone else got a list?
    Originally posted by buglawton

    Do you also still drive a car with a carburettor and points and condenser ignition?
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • RumRat
    • By RumRat 7th Jul 18, 1:43 PM
    • 2,893 Posts
    • 1,691 Thanks
    RumRat
    Even for the adverts for voice-controlled assistants they apparently can't think of a practical use. I prefer to be about a decade behind the cutting edge and wait for the early adopters to pay for the beta testing.
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    A decade???Good luck...
    Drinking Rum before 10am makes you
    A PIRATE
    Not an Alcoholic...!
    • Debbie Savard
    • By Debbie Savard 7th Jul 18, 2:39 PM
    • 419 Posts
    • 363 Thanks
    Debbie Savard
    Anything prefixed 'eco' or marketed as 'green'
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 7th Jul 18, 2:45 PM
    • 7,639 Posts
    • 4,261 Thanks
    buglawton
    Yes I should have added voice controlled assistants to my list. I donít like everyone to hear what Iím searching for or me dictating text. One could be useful on my iPhone when driving but it would fail to do what I want: Control the iPlayer Radio app precisely and also my rather bespoke podcast solution app which just a web downloader/media player. And Iíd want that assistant to deactivate as soon as i stop driving.
    • Tigsteroonie
    • By Tigsteroonie 7th Jul 18, 2:50 PM
    • 22,847 Posts
    • 57,340 Thanks
    Tigsteroonie
    Whilst the keyless entry to our car can be useful, we didn't ask for it or pay for it - the car we chose comes with it as standard. Personally I'd prefer to have a real key.
    Mrs Marleyboy

    MSE: many of the benefits of a helpful family, without disadvantages like having to compete for the tv remote

    Proud Parents to an Au-some son
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 7th Jul 18, 3:21 PM
    • 17,292 Posts
    • 10,436 Thanks
    motorguy
    If i can see a benefit in it for me - such as makes my life easier, then yes, i'm in so usually not "technology for the sake of it".

    I dont use Fakebook or Twitter but use Whatsapp as its easy to keep in touch with my wife when i work away from home and my son in Australia. To give an example of that my son WhatsApp called me recently to my mobile phone when i was in my car and my phone bluetoothed that through my car so i was able to talk to him hands free. Quite amazing when you think of it and all free.

    I like the music streaming services, particularly Amazon where you can have pretty much your own station or Rock Station or Megadeth Station or whatever where it plays that artist and similar stuff you might like, all advert free and all can be bluetoothed through your car.

    I do like trying the latest tech though. The latest is an Oculus Go VR headset. I think we'll see that market grow.

    Smart TVs are a god send. Absolutely amazing. Saves us a fortune compared to a Sky setup.

    We've our house heating zoned for every room so we can program a temperature in any given room, which is nice. Also have solar water heating and use a Biomass burner as our primary heat source.

    Love new tech in cars too but as per above, i dont want to pay a disproportionate amount for it - both our cars are keyless but that was standard.
    Last edited by motorguy; 07-07-2018 at 3:23 PM.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 7th Jul 18, 3:32 PM
    • 1,781 Posts
    • 2,728 Thanks
    coffeehound
    The latest is an Oculus Go VR headset. I think we'll see that market grow.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    What for though, just gaming? It's a classic example really: in the 1990s you saw people wearing VR headsets waving their arms around on TV and we were told it was the future. Fast-forward 20 years and exactly the same views of people wearing VR headsets waving their arms around. In 20 years they hadn't found a use for it. (And they make you barf.)
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 7th Jul 18, 3:45 PM
    • 17,292 Posts
    • 10,436 Thanks
    motorguy
    What for though, just gaming? It's a classic example really: in the 1990s you saw people wearing VR headsets waving their arms around on TV and we were told it was the future. Fast-forward 20 years and exactly the same views of people wearing VR headsets waving their arms around. In 20 years they hadn't found a use for it. (And they make you barf.)
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    Games, Netflix, internet, theres Oculus Room chat functionality where you can chat with your friends who have a headset too, various VR immersive experiences (Disney / Star Wars, etc).

    The gaming experience is very good. You do get the impression of being "in" the game rather than just playing it.

    The constraints of VR from decades ago was

    (a) The resolution - fairly naff so not a believable experience
    (b) The weight of the headsets - much lighter now
    (c) The interface itself was poor
    (d) The requirement to have it connected to a PC gaming console
    (e) The processor speeds werent great.

    The Go is standalone. The hand controller and the interface itself are excellent. Makes a big big difference. Its not perfect but i think its a game changer as it gives you 90% of the capability of say, the Oculus Rift for half the price and in a standalone unit.

    I think its only now the technology is really starting to catch up with the concept.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
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