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  • FIRST POST
    • Susieee
    • By Susieee 12th Jun 18, 2:10 PM
    • 12Posts
    • 9Thanks
    Susieee
    House sale without Electrical Certificates
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:10 PM
    House sale without Electrical Certificates 12th Jun 18 at 2:10 PM
    Would you buy a house with no electrical certificates?

    I have fallen in love with a house which was rewired 25 years ago. I am worried that some parts of it do not look safe.

    What would you do?
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 12th Jun 18, 2:17 PM
    • 26,103 Posts
    • 70,511 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:17 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:17 PM
    Commission an electrical report. It's what you're supposed to do anyway.

    Elements of it won't be compliant with current regs but that doesn't mean it isn't safe.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 12th Jun 18, 2:17 PM
    • 1,005 Posts
    • 1,224 Thanks
    need an answer
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:17 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:17 PM
    Factor it in to any renovation costs going forward.

    You could always commission your own electrical inspection,in fact I would recommend that over anything that the vendor may wish to supply.

    To put things into context many houses wont come with any or even recent certification.
    I had a property completely rewired around 5 years ago which now does not conform to up to date regulations,thats how fast these things change.
    in S 41 T 64 F 66
    out S 60 T 69 F 78
    2017 -32
    • Niv
    • By Niv 12th Jun 18, 2:23 PM
    • 1,702 Posts
    • 1,525 Thanks
    Niv
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:23 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:23 PM
    Would you buy a house with no electrical certificates?

    I have fallen in love with a house which was rewired 25 years ago. I am worried that some parts of it do not look safe.

    What would you do?
    Originally posted by Susieee


    In which case the certificate is pointless anyway as it would not magically look safe because you had a piece of paper.


    As suggested above, commission a report if you feel it necessary.
    YNWA

    Target: Mortgage free by 58.
    • foxy-stoat
    • By foxy-stoat 12th Jun 18, 2:33 PM
    • 3,169 Posts
    • 1,788 Thanks
    foxy-stoat
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:33 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 18, 2:33 PM
    If its a dream house then get any work done necessary to make it look safe - not many dream houses out there and a some bare wires poking out of the wall shouldn't stop you buying it.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Jun 18, 3:10 PM
    • 26,839 Posts
    • 96,544 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 18, 3:10 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 18, 3:10 PM
    I have fallen in love with a house which was rewired 25 years ago. I am worried that some parts of it do not look safe.

    What would you do?
    Originally posted by Susieee

    I would rejoice if all that was wrong from a first inspection was the look of some wiring!

    I probably wouldn't bother with an electrical report initially, as I'd assume some major updating would be in order, along with the attendant re-decoration. You might need more reassurance. A report is relatively cheap.

    I'd get a full buildings survey first if I didn't know much about house construction. There are potentially more expensive things to consider than rewiring, which might be 4 - 5.5k on a middle-sized house.
    "We won't get fooled again...."
    • plumberpaig
    • By plumberpaig 12th Jun 18, 3:20 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    plumberpaig
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 18, 3:20 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 18, 3:20 PM
    As above, find a good local registered tradesman to carry out an electrical installation condition report for you. The cost should be about 150. If faults are found you could even use the report to your advantage, getting a little bit of money off the price!

    Odd wires hanging loose doesn't automatically mean an installation is safe, it could just be redundant wiring that hasn't been removed. If the house is in good condition otherwise, then there might be cause for a little bit of concern.

    An EICR will reveal all.

    Do let us know how you get on...
    • ForumUser
    • By ForumUser 12th Jun 18, 3:28 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    ForumUser
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 18, 3:28 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 18, 3:28 PM
    If faults are found you could even use the report to your advantage, getting a little bit of money off the price!
    Originally posted by plumberpaig
    Is the seller selling the house with full and current electrical certification? If not, then why would they give you money off?
    • Susieee
    • By Susieee 12th Jun 18, 4:49 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Susieee
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 18, 4:49 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 18, 4:49 PM
    Thank you everybody for your replies. I am going to go ahead and have the gas and electrical safety certificates carried out by a competent engineer.

    Will let you guys know how I get on.
    • KL0001
    • By KL0001 12th Jun 18, 4:53 PM
    • 89 Posts
    • 96 Thanks
    KL0001
    I!!!8217;d factor that there is the chance or repairs/updates required. Most houses will have older electrics, chances are the whole house doesn!!!8217;t need rewriring and maybe just parts of it updating.

    Unless your buying a new build house or a newly renovated older one, electrics are just part of the ongoing maintainace of owning a property.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 12th Jun 18, 5:03 PM
    • 46,140 Posts
    • 55,810 Thanks
    G_M
    Thank you everybody for your replies. I am going to go ahead and have the gas and electrical safety certificates carried out by a competent engineer.
    Originally posted by Susieee
    Make sure you understand the difference between
    * 'not to current standards' (which will inevitably be on the report) and
    * dangerous


    The standards change regularly but houses do not need to be continuously updated to reflect them.


    Example. My house was built in 1851, with very shallow foundations as was typical at the time. It has survived 150 years. Today's 'current standards' would require foundations twice the depth but no one expects me to deepen my foundations!
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 12th Jun 18, 5:17 PM
    • 1,125 Posts
    • 1,366 Thanks
    ProDave
    Tell us in what way some things don't look safe?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Jun 18, 5:49 PM
    • 26,839 Posts
    • 96,544 Thanks
    Davesnave
    I!!!8217;d factor that there is the chance or repairs/updates required. Most houses will have older electrics, chances are the whole house doesn!!!8217;t need rewriring and maybe just parts of it updating.
    Originally posted by KL0001
    While that could well be the case, one then has the job of convincing an electrician to do a part rewire.



    Those I contacted didn't want to do that. They were busy enough to walk away, rather than take on someone else's wiring as well as their own.



    It may be different elsewhere, of course.
    "We won't get fooled again...."
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