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    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 13th May 18, 6:17 PM
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    Silence101
    Redesigning garden using current plants?
    • #1
    • 13th May 18, 6:17 PM
    Redesigning garden using current plants? 13th May 18 at 6:17 PM
    We've bought a new build, meaning our garden was basically a square of turf. In an attempt to create a cottage style flower border, I've been planting flowers and seeds, in a rather iggledy pickedly kind of way, and now that the plants are finally starting to grow, I've realised that that might not have been the best plan, as some of the shorter flowers are at the back of the border, and taller ones near the front. I also realised that I didn't make sections with my plants, so for example there's a tulip here, and another over there, etc instead of a clump of each kind of flower
    I'm planning on waiting until autumn now as the plants are starting to flower, but will I be able to transplant most of the flowers to new positions, or is it likely that I'm going to have to start from scratch again? I mainly planted perennials.
    Thanks!
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
Page 1
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 13th May 18, 6:34 PM
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    Linda32
    • #2
    • 13th May 18, 6:34 PM
    • #2
    • 13th May 18, 6:34 PM
    Would you be able to tell us the names of the plants.

    We are not really in charge either, nature does what it likes every year. I sow seeds every year and today I have been looking back a photos and it looks different every year. Stick with what you have got this year and do something different next year.
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 13th May 18, 7:08 PM
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    Silence101
    • #3
    • 13th May 18, 7:08 PM
    • #3
    • 13th May 18, 7:08 PM
    We've planted quite a few, and I've forgotten most of the names!
    Off the top of my head, we've planted
    Pansies
    Crocus
    Dianthus
    Cosmos
    Sweatpea
    Cyclamen
    Lavender
    Stock
    Zinnias
    Marigolds
    Irises
    Daffodils
    Digitalis
    Gladioli
    and lots of annual seeds, but I understand those would have to be replanted next year.
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Sambella
    • By Sambella 13th May 18, 7:43 PM
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    Sambella
    • #4
    • 13th May 18, 7:43 PM
    • #4
    • 13th May 18, 7:43 PM
    You can transplant perennials usually without problems unless it is specially delicate or wont survive going from sun to shade. Transplanting is also a good time to split them and gain new plants also if they are big enough.

    Generally if they flower in spring it is safe to move them in autumn.

    Digitalis will self seed all over the place if you let it.

    You have bulbs as well which can be moved once flowering has finished but before the leaves dissapear ( so you know where they are). Cut leaves after moving leaving around an inch or two or simply dry and store the bulds and plant next spring.
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 13th May 18, 7:54 PM
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    Silence101
    • #5
    • 13th May 18, 7:54 PM
    • #5
    • 13th May 18, 7:54 PM
    Thanks! I didn't know that about the digitalis!
    Does that mean I could move the crocuses now, as they flowered earlier in the year?
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 13th May 18, 8:31 PM
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    Linda32
    • #6
    • 13th May 18, 8:31 PM
    • #6
    • 13th May 18, 8:31 PM
    Is that besides the ones you have forgotten!

    Sounds as if you will be doing just fine to me.

    Irises, daffs, crocus, and gladioli plants that can be moved. I would do this in the autumn. You might need to mark where they were are they will die back. Stick a stick in ground. Dianthus and lavender can be moved. Cyclamen and stock, not sure never grown in the ground.

    Others I think last for one year only.
    • Sambella
    • By Sambella 13th May 18, 8:56 PM
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    Sambella
    • #7
    • 13th May 18, 8:56 PM
    • #7
    • 13th May 18, 8:56 PM
    You might get away with moving crocus's now if they flowered early as we aren't too far away from Sping.
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 13th May 18, 10:05 PM
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    Silence101
    • #8
    • 13th May 18, 10:05 PM
    • #8
    • 13th May 18, 10:05 PM
    Is that besides the ones you have forgotten!.
    Originally posted by Linda32
    Yes, I think we went a bit over the top with the amount of plants, so am expecting the poor flowers to be fighting for light by the end of June! Especially as the beds aren't huge.
    I might have to do some thinning out once the plants have grown some more.
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 13th May 18, 10:08 PM
    • 356 Posts
    • 552 Thanks
    Silence101
    • #9
    • 13th May 18, 10:08 PM
    • #9
    • 13th May 18, 10:08 PM
    Thank you both, I'm looking forward to seeing how it grows this year, and try and create something more logical next year. I'm also learning that I've put plants that like water next to plants that like dry soil, so I'm going to have to do better groupings if I want them all to thrive.
    I'm calling it my big experiment !!!55357;!!!56836; Luckily most were cheap plants and seeds, so if it all goes pear shaped I can try again next year.
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 13th May 18, 10:38 PM
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    Linda32
    Yes, I think we went a bit over the top with the amount of plants, so am expecting the poor flowers to be fighting for light by the end of June! Especially as the beds aren't huge.
    I might have to do some thinning out once the plants have grown some more.
    Originally posted by Silence101
    No, no, not at all, it is great that you have lots of plants, the smother any weeds that might like to grow.

    It was just that I didn't expect so much when you were willing to start from scratch! I grow different things every year and my garden looks different every year. I love doing it and would hate it to be the same every year. I'm sure yours will be the same.
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 14th May 18, 1:56 AM
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    Silence101
    Yes, I expect it will keep evolving every year!
    We're keeping the beds fairly small so that I can weed easily. We used to rent a house with a huge flower bed, and although lovely it was impossible to keep on top of the weeds.
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Debbie Savard
    • By Debbie Savard 14th May 18, 11:30 AM
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    Debbie Savard
    >Off the top of my head, we've planted <

    A fair number of those are annuals anway (or biennial like the foxglove), or bulbs like Gladioli which need to be lifted and stored frost-free over winter
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 14th May 18, 11:48 AM
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    andrewf75
    I move stuff around all the time as long as the plants are smallish and you can get all the roots out they will hardly notice, just do it on a cool day and keep them well watered after moving.
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 14th May 18, 6:36 PM
    • 356 Posts
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    Silence101
    >Off the top of my head, we've planted <

    A fair number of those are annuals anway (or biennial like the foxglove), or bulbs like Gladioli which need to be lifted and stored frost-free over winter
    Originally posted by Debbie Savard
    I didn't know I had to keep the gladioli bulbs away from frost. Thanks for letting me know!
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 15th May 18, 2:19 PM
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    Katiehound
    One thing you might like to try is to replant your crocus bulbs in the lawn- in a small clump or a swathe. Hopefully they should naturalise and increase there and be protected under the grass from slugs and snails. Anything leafy in my garden gets munched!
    Usually the leaves are up before you first cut the grass in spring or you can identify the striped leaves and not mow them!

    I find cylamen in my garden love the shade and have multiplied.

    Marigolds (assuming you mean calendula) should self seed

    One way of increasing your stock- particularly like small shrubs, established plants is to get chatting to any locals with pretty/ well stocked gardens. It pays to admire and chat!! Most gardeners are happy to give away plants when splitting up large clumps or perhaps growing some cuttings for you

    A few well chosen shrubs would give you some height at the back of beds- loads to choose from including variegated and flowering varities, then flower borders in front.

    Depending on the winter and the aspect / protection in your garden some annuals may survive the winter. Several years ago I had a red geranium that grew up a wall intertwined with a shrub to about 6 feet and lived a couple of mild winters.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Many thanks

    2018 Wombling : Entrant 8 ..2319 cc+.2205mm (2.20.5) + RK 5.21= 30.64.5
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 15th May 18, 9:15 PM
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    • 552 Thanks
    Silence101
    Thanks so much for all the tips! I never thought of planting things in the lawn, and yes, we seem to have hungry snails and slugs who even managed to eat the hyacinth flowers before they bloomed!
    I will probably have to replant the cyclamen, as they're not in the shadiest part of the garden. Because we moved in in October, I didn't realise quite how much sun the garden gets. All winter I was despairing at the tiny slither of sun we had, but now, 90% ish of the garden gets hit by the midday sun.
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 18th May 18, 11:00 PM
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    Katiehound
    Just remembered- being money saving ! that once the foxgloves have flowered you can cut the flower spikes off and you may well be able to keep the plants for a further year. Worth a try.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Many thanks

    2018 Wombling : Entrant 8 ..2319 cc+.2205mm (2.20.5) + RK 5.21= 30.64.5
    • Silence101
    • By Silence101 19th May 18, 6:25 AM
    • 356 Posts
    • 552 Thanks
    Silence101
    Thanks! I'll give it a go!
    09/17 Shared Ownership 50% share - Mortgage 77500 Original MFW 2052
    17/18 OP 7700
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