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  • FIRST POST
    • AimHigh
    • By AimHigh 8th May 18, 10:26 AM
    • 104Posts
    • 32Thanks
    AimHigh
    Some Economics with your breakfast
    • #1
    • 8th May 18, 10:26 AM
    Some Economics with your breakfast 8th May 18 at 10:26 AM
    Morning all,

    Appreciate this is a subjective question but I was just wondering what websites/papers/resources people use on a daily basis to see what might be affecting the economic landscape?

    I know Warren Buffett (amongst others) talks about how much reading he does but I wondered what the daily routines for the average person whose day job can't revolve around wading through news etc., might be.

    I'm certainly not knowledgeable enough yet to scan headlines without spending time investigating the potential economic impact and equally fall foul to sensationalism at times. Hopefully that'll change with experience...

    So, what resource(s) do you use and can anyone recommend (subjective) some that provide accurate and balanced info rather than OTT headlines to sell a few papers?

    AH
Page 1
    • Economic
    • By Economic 8th May 18, 10:57 AM
    • 248 Posts
    • 227 Thanks
    Economic
    • #2
    • 8th May 18, 10:57 AM
    • #2
    • 8th May 18, 10:57 AM
    FT and Bloomberg.
    • ColdIron
    • By ColdIron 8th May 18, 11:08 AM
    • 4,148 Posts
    • 5,230 Thanks
    ColdIron
    • #3
    • 8th May 18, 11:08 AM
    • #3
    • 8th May 18, 11:08 AM
    Citywire has a number of short and digestible news outlets, sign up for email alerts and choose the articles you want to read from the headlines

    http://citywire.co.uk/money
    http://citywire.co.uk/wealth-manager
    http://citywire.co.uk/investment-trust-insider
    Last edited by ColdIron; 08-05-2018 at 11:19 AM.
    • AimHigh
    • By AimHigh 8th May 18, 11:15 AM
    • 104 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    AimHigh
    • #4
    • 8th May 18, 11:15 AM
    • #4
    • 8th May 18, 11:15 AM
    FT and Bloomberg.
    Originally posted by Economic
    I do like FT. Frustratingly my comp didn't renew their subscription this year though

    Citywire has a number of short and digestible news outlets, sign up for email alerts and chose the articles you want to read from the headlines

    http://citywire.co.uk/money
    http://citywire.co.uk/wealth-manager
    http://citywire.co.uk/investment-trust-insider
    Originally posted by ColdIron
    Thanks ColdIron, will take a look
    • firestone
    • By firestone 8th May 18, 12:06 PM
    • 226 Posts
    • 100 Thanks
    firestone
    • #5
    • 8th May 18, 12:06 PM
    • #5
    • 8th May 18, 12:06 PM
    Trustnet also have new articles every day
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 8th May 18, 12:41 PM
    • 7,828 Posts
    • 14,298 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    • #6
    • 8th May 18, 12:41 PM
    • #6
    • 8th May 18, 12:41 PM
    Trustnet also have new articles every day
    Originally posted by firestone
    Yes, though much of their content is soundbites and advertorial from fund managers or investment platforms, which doesn't hurt if you just want somewhere to start with some facts or opinions -but you do need to put some effort into sorting the wheat from the chaff to get an unbiased take on things.

    I like Deloitte's Monday Briefing - they pick a short economics topic for a few paragraphs each Monday morning on their blog, but if you sign up to have it emailed to your inbox it also comes with bullet point key financial/economic headlines of the week - the bullet point stuff is just the headlines, no fluff, bit of humour in the signoff. And every summer or Christmas if they take a week or two off from producing content they give you a reading list of decent articles or books that have caught their eye. http://blogs.deloitte.co.uk/mondaybriefing/

    Other large professional firms are active in producing economic reviews or surveys and interpretations of them, eg EY's ITEM club. And who could forget the Economist, much better quality than the business pages of the free papers, but, not cheap to sign up to a year's worth. I'd prefer it to be monthly as I don't really have time to read a whole one every week, better to borrow one from someone else!
    • firestone
    • By firestone 8th May 18, 1:25 PM
    • 226 Posts
    • 100 Thanks
    firestone
    • #7
    • 8th May 18, 1:25 PM
    • #7
    • 8th May 18, 1:25 PM
    By borrow you mean read in WH Smiths?
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 8th May 18, 2:53 PM
    • 7,828 Posts
    • 14,298 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    • #8
    • 8th May 18, 2:53 PM
    • #8
    • 8th May 18, 2:53 PM
    By borrow you mean read in WH Smiths?
    Originally posted by firestone
    Like a typical lengthy bowlhead99 post, it's best read when you're sitting down with time to get your head around it.

    If you subscribe and get it every week you will probably not get through it every single week and then they start to build up. I ended up dropping my subscription as it started to feel like a bit of a chore to make time for them, which is not what you want for something you're reading for self improvement rather than work. Yet if I wasn't going to read them I was thinking of the 15 a month subscription l could be spending on something else.

    See if you can get your local library to stock them (if you use one) or your employer to subscribe to stick them in an office somewhere along with whatever other industry press for your type of business, to give you something to do with your lunchtime when the mood takes.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 8th May 18, 2:57 PM
    • 9,392 Posts
    • 10,371 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #9
    • 8th May 18, 2:57 PM
    • #9
    • 8th May 18, 2:57 PM
    None of them. Unless you are a day trader todays news doesnt matter, and if you are, its too late.
    • AimHigh
    • By AimHigh 8th May 18, 3:11 PM
    • 104 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    AimHigh
    Yes, though much of their content is soundbites and advertorial from fund managers or investment platforms, which doesn't hurt if you just want somewhere to start with some facts or opinions -but you do need to put some effort into sorting the wheat from the chaff to get an unbiased take on things.

    I like Deloitte's Monday Briefing - they pick a short economics topic for a few paragraphs each Monday morning on their blog, but if you sign up to have it emailed to your inbox it also comes with bullet point key financial/economic headlines of the week - the bullet point stuff is just the headlines, no fluff, bit of humour in the signoff. And every summer or Christmas if they take a week or two off from producing content they give you a reading list of decent articles or books that have caught their eye. http://blogs.deloitte.co.uk/mondaybriefing/

    Other large professional firms are active in producing economic reviews or surveys and interpretations of them, eg EY's ITEM club. And who could forget the Economist, much better quality than the business pages of the free papers, but, not cheap to sign up to a year's worth. I'd prefer it to be monthly as I don't really have time to read a whole one every week, better to borrow one from someone else!
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    That sounds like exactly the type of resource that I would benefit from so many thanks.

    None of them. Unless you are a day trader todays news doesnt matter, and if you are, its too late.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    I understand your point but don't think it can hurt to keep on top of current events for both "self improvement" (thanks bowlhead99) and spotting overall trends that are bound to impact your investment and life decisions eventually.
    • Ifts
    • By Ifts 8th May 18, 8:17 PM
    • 1,790 Posts
    • 1,131 Thanks
    Ifts
    I use http://www.digitallook.com or their new website that they are moving over to - https://uk.webfg.com/ (I preferred the old website layout!).

    Also use http://citywire.co.uk/money/latest-news - as ColdIron mentions it has easy to digest articles.
    Never let the perfume of the premium overpower the odour of the risk
    • bestyet
    • By bestyet 8th May 18, 11:30 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    bestyet
    new to investment, daily enjoy listening bbc wakeup to money in the morning before heading to office, also bbc live market.

    Occasionally FT Money, Economists from local library which is a bit hard for me to digest.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 9th May 18, 9:36 AM
    • 9,392 Posts
    • 10,371 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    I understand your point but don't think it can hurt to keep on top of current events for both "self improvement" (thanks bowlhead99) and spotting overall trends that are bound to impact your investment and life decisions eventually.
    Originally posted by AimHigh
    Here's what can happen when you do that.

    https://youtu.be/SKXVmwX0-_c

    (summary, someone read lots of current stories about the company they had invested in and bailed out far too early, believing the naysayers) . (And just in case it looks like I'm so smart, ive done the same except in reverse, read the stories, invested, got burned.)

    Your thesis is, if i am right, by reading about current (and potential future) events you are better informed and will make decisions now that will set you up for the future. OTOH as that short video shows, you could easily read things now that actually are going to mislead you. And its tough to know which are the right ones and you could equally be mislead as put on the right track.

    The issue then is, you cant live in a black hole of news and make investment decisions either, so what do you do? I look at whats happening, what trends i see and ignore the day to day noise and Id count even an august journal like the Economist in with that.

    I've invested in battery technology because its obvious to me this is a massive coming trend. I invested in solid state memory back in the late 90's because it was obvious to me that digital cameras would replace film. I've now invested in biotech and healthcare because its obvious to me thats with aging populations thats where a lot of money will be made.

    I dont need to read the Economist every day to be aware of those. But, just to make a point, here's an article from The Economist from 2003 on digital cameras. Would you invest in Kodak on the basis of that? Or would you invest in their competitors on the basis of that article? Hmmmm hard to say. Maybe both? I note that super clever investor Carl Icahn spent $500m on Kodak shares. Well, maybe he knows whats what, so you should invest on the basis of that snippet? That wouldn't have worked out so well.

    The trick answer is of course you have have invested in neither, since both were within a few years utterly eclipsed by camera-enabled smartphones which weren't even a thing then. And without blowing my own trumpet i was investing in the memory that digital cameras used about 5 years before that article was written.

    Now to be fair, investing in the "picks and shovels" of digital memory would have been a good strategy to pick back when that article was written. But the article doesn't even mention that. OK its about Kodak so maybe that isn't its rationale but it wouldn't have helped anyone reading the article to even consider that possibility. At best, you'd have ignored the article entirely since investing in any of the companies mentioned would have been a terrible idea.
    Last edited by AnotherJoe; 09-05-2018 at 10:17 AM.
    • AimHigh
    • By AimHigh 9th May 18, 1:53 PM
    • 104 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    AimHigh
    Completely appreciate where you're coming from AnotherJoe and not denying that what you're saying is true. I'd be lying if I said that investing in individual shares doesn't appeal to me but if/when I get to that point it'll be on top of a core portfolio of funds etc.

    However, as you successfully did with solid state memory (and hopefully battery technology - keep grinding Mr Musk), I'm interested in keeping on top of current events so that I can also get a feel for industries on the rise. And that aside, nothing wrong with improving your ability to understand the impact of current events on the economy in general
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 9th May 18, 3:51 PM
    • 2,678 Posts
    • 7,680 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    Like a typical lengthy bowlhead99 post, it's best read when you're sitting down with time to get your head around it.

    If you subscribe and get it every week you will probably not get through it every single week and then they start to build up. I ended up dropping my subscription as it started to feel like a bit of a chore to make time for them, which is not what you want for something you're reading for self improvement rather than work. Yet if I wasn't going to read them I was thinking of the 15 a month subscription l could be spending on something else.

    See if you can get your local library to stock them (if you use one) or your employer to subscribe to stick them in an office somewhere along with whatever other industry press for your type of business, to give you something to do with your lunchtime when the mood takes.
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    My DH decided to try a very cheap subscription offer for the Economist. It might have been the 12 weeks for 12 one. Months and months later they still keep coming. We aren't paying but they resist all attempts to get them to stop sending !
    • Plus
    • By Plus 9th May 18, 11:28 PM
    • 356 Posts
    • 279 Thanks
    Plus
    I dont need to read the Economist every day to be aware of those. But, just to make a point, here's an article from The Economist from 2003 on digital cameras. Would you invest in Kodak on the basis of that? Or would you invest in their competitors on the basis of that article? Hmmmm hard to say. Maybe both? I note that super clever investor Carl Icahn spent $500m on Kodak shares. Well, maybe he knows whats what, so you should invest on the basis of that snippet? That wouldn't have worked out so well.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    I think I would argue that the Economist is not an investment magazine, it (despite the print format) is a newspaper. Newspapers tell you about the state of the world. They often tell you what other people think about the state of the world. They don't tell you what to do about it.

    People who are selling things (ie fund managers) love to tell you what to do about it - buy their fund obviously, because it'll be great. Sometimes they're worthwhile even if you don't (eg you buy their competitor's fund in the same sector because it's cheaper).

    This all feeds into your general model of what's happening in a particular area, and they you can look into investment opportunities. Maybe European shares are cheap (on a macro level) or maybe IzzyWhizzyPharma has a promising new drug (on a micro level). Trustnet or stock screening or the trade press or stock exchange announcements or annual reports are where you find out about those.

    The purpose of reading newspapers is to be reasonably well informed, not to tell you what to buy. That's what DYOR is about.
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