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  • FIRST POST
    • lovehols
    • By lovehols 15th Apr 18, 5:45 PM
    • 214Posts
    • 121Thanks
    lovehols
    Getting rid of ivy help please
    • #1
    • 15th Apr 18, 5:45 PM
    Getting rid of ivy help please 15th Apr 18 at 5:45 PM
    We have purchased a house which has been empty for some time. Some of the borders have ground ivy which has covered some tree stumps and the ivy had started to climb up some of the trees. We have started to cut through the this and pull as much of it up as we can, we filled a large bag. This is just one area.

    Is there an easier way? Once we have cut and pulled as much of it up, is there anything we should treat the ground with and kill any remainder? We hope to clear it then plant some shrubs/perennials that need relocating from another area.

    I.Hate.ivy

    This is a pic of the area we tackled today.

    http://imgbox.com/iFSeePGw
Page 1
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 15th Apr 18, 10:02 PM
    • 1,672 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #2
    • 15th Apr 18, 10:02 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Apr 18, 10:02 PM
    I think you've just got to be really vigilant and pull up any new shoots that appear once you've cleared it. I don't think there is a short cut to treating it.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 16th Apr 18, 8:15 AM
    • 23,791 Posts
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    pollypenny
    • #3
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:15 AM
    • #3
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:15 AM
    Oh, ivy is a pain. You just have to keep at it.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • lovehols
    • By lovehols 16th Apr 18, 8:21 AM
    • 214 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    lovehols
    • #4
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:21 AM
    • #4
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:21 AM
    Thanks everyone. Will tackle it again after work.

    I've also seen that a white vinegar, salt and washing up liquid mix can be a good weedkiller, unless anyone has any other recommendations so that is going to be on the list once we have cleared as much as we can.

    It's awful stuff. I suspect what was a teeny tiny bit went out of control once the lady passed away and the house was empty.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 16th Apr 18, 8:45 AM
    • 4,112 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #5
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:45 AM
    • #5
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:45 AM
    Persistence is key. However, why so many people enthuse about salt/vinegar/bleach/whatever as weedkiller, when weedkiller itself exists puzzles me.

    Regular application of glyphosate will kill it. Keep the vinegar and salt for chips once you are done, washing up liquid (in its rightful place too) to wash plates afterwards...
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 16th Apr 18, 9:46 AM
    • 1,199 Posts
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    rach_k
    • #6
    • 16th Apr 18, 9:46 AM
    • #6
    • 16th Apr 18, 9:46 AM
    Just keep going. Even if you kill it off first, you'll still have to pull it up and some of the dead stuff left behind can still be tough, so I'd just grit my teeth and get on with it. Once you've cleared the bulk, you could use weedkiller on any stubborn bits that keep coming back, but if you stay on top of it it shouldn't be too bad.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 16th Apr 18, 9:58 AM
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    getmore4less
    • #7
    • 16th Apr 18, 9:58 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Apr 18, 9:58 AM
    Once cut at the base the stuff climbing will die off and be easier to clear.

    If you can wait a bit a generous application(s) of your chosen weed killer.

    give it a chance(Ivy does not absorb as good as other plants) then clear out off the site as much as you can.

    Cover the area completely with some decent weed/drive sheeting.

    Tidy up the edges with some border edging if desired I have been looking at this stuff to create barrier edges.
    https://www.homebase.co.uk/lawn-edging-75mm-x-10-metre-green_p425111

    mulch/gravel.

    it will look fairly decent, I have used wood chip over 100gm ground cover @50p sqm around my raised beds and it has stopped the brambles that were invading.

    Treat anything that breaks through around the edge or planting holes.

    How long before you can lift the sheeting I am not sure, it might die back but could just go dormant and come back.

    This should reduce the maintenance headache for a few years and look neat and tidy, if you can get the wood chip cheap the edging and sheet will be under £100.

    You can plant through the sheeting once the initial applications of weed killer are timed out.
    (if you want to plant sooner just clear to ground lever then cover and you can plant through immediately

    Have you though about those stumps there are some great ideas for making them into features if you have a browse of the web.
    Last edited by getmore4less; 16-04-2018 at 10:00 AM.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 16th Apr 18, 10:10 AM
    • 29,107 Posts
    • 74,409 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #8
    • 16th Apr 18, 10:10 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Apr 18, 10:10 AM

    If you can wait a bit a generous application(s) of your chosen weed killer.

    give it a chance(Ivy does not absorb as good as other plants) then clear out off the site as much as you can.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    The weed killer will be absorbed better if you crush or trample on the leaves and break the shiny surface layer before applying the glyphosate.

    Glyphosate gets translocated through the whole plant and will kill the roots - homemade weed killers won’t do that.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 16th Apr 18, 10:18 AM
    • 13,752 Posts
    • 18,032 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #9
    • 16th Apr 18, 10:18 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Apr 18, 10:18 AM
    I had an ivy problem but found that hammering copper into the cut ends at root level prevented regrowth.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
    • lovehols
    • By lovehols 16th Apr 18, 10:37 AM
    • 214 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    lovehols
    Thank you everyone.

    I've no idea what to do with the stumps yet. They were also covered with ivy.

    Can anyone help with weedkiller.

    Is this any good?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B071JPLQCM/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=A32JUGRFXXDAQ3&psc=1

    Or would it be better to go for something like this?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B01BWVLHPM/ref=ox_sc_act_image_2?smid=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&psc=1

    I'm going to continue to pull up as much of the stuff as I can, cutting it and pulling it up then treat the area will weedkiller, before tackling another area
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 16th Apr 18, 10:49 AM
    • 29,107 Posts
    • 74,409 Thanks
    Mojisola
    I'm going to continue to pull up as much of the stuff as I can, cutting it and pulling it up then treat the area will weedkiller, before tackling another area
    Originally posted by lovehols
    Glyphosate needs to be sprayed on the leaves - it won't do anything if you use it on cleared ground.
    • lovehols
    • By lovehols 16th Apr 18, 10:51 AM
    • 214 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    lovehols
    Glyphosate needs to be sprayed on the leaves - it won't do anything if you use it on cleared ground.
    Originally posted by Mojisola

    Ah I see

    I gu as that is the same for any weedkiller then. Perhaps we will leave what we have done and just weedkiller it!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 16th Apr 18, 4:24 PM
    • 31,877 Posts
    • 19,102 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Keep an eye on end of season deals on garden stuff.

    Wilko and Tesco... Have giveaway prices.

    If you have a lot of areas to do the cover up approach reduces the work load early on.

    If the garden was previously well kept there may good stuff yet to appear due to the colder weather, might be worth saving.

    Any old pictures would help you find where stuff is.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 16th Apr 18, 6:40 PM
    • 31,877 Posts
    • 19,102 Thanks
    getmore4less
    I keep forgetting there is a gardening board on here that is very helpful.

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/forumdisplay.php?f=134
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 16th Apr 18, 10:01 PM
    • 24,788 Posts
    • 92,042 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Thank you everyone.

    I've no idea what to do with the stumps yet. They were also covered with ivy.

    Can anyone help with weedkiller.

    Is this any good?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B071JPLQCM/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=A32JUGRFXXDAQ3&psc=1

    Or would it be better to go for something like this?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B01BWVLHPM/ref=ox_sc_act_image_2?smid=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&psc=1

    I'm going to continue to pull up as much of the stuff as I can, cutting it and pulling it up then treat the area will weedkiller, before tackling another area
    Originally posted by lovehols
    The two weedlkillers are basically the same. The maximum strength of glyphosate sold to home gardeners is 360g/l.

    It's cheaper buying it this way than pre-mixed and there's no great advantage in going stronger.

    Because it isn't a soil poison, glyphosate takes about 3 weeks to show a good effect. It works through blocking part of the process by which plants make food.

    It's OK to plant into an area that's been glyphosated very soon afterwards.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • lovehols
    • By lovehols 16th Apr 18, 10:03 PM
    • 214 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    lovehols
    Thanks for posting that link. I had no idea there was a gardening board either!

    Well after being stuck at a computer all day another hour of tackling the ivy did me and it good and it is looking much better. I really don't want to put killer down as I've discovered a lovely rose bush and some nice grasses that were covered by the ivy, and a couple of other plants I've no idea what they are!

    It seems that the initial work of cutting the woven down roots and pulling up as much is the hardest work. It seemed far easier today to tug out the roots todah because you can see much more of the ground now.

    I think a few more hours and then at the weekend getting a spade and digging over it all and pulling out the remaining roots will mean I can start to relocate some of the shrubs from another area and plant some other things that have become pot bound that have been left.

    Just a lot of hard graft and I'll be inspecting the area continually looking for any bits I've missed that decide to come back. And move onto another patch it has overtaken!
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