Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • HannahRakey
    • By HannahRakey 12th Apr 18, 3:56 PM
    • 3Posts
    • 6Thanks
    HannahRakey
    Offer accepted 6 months ago and vendors show no signs of moving - ultimatum offered and no response.
    • #1
    • 12th Apr 18, 3:56 PM
    Offer accepted 6 months ago and vendors show no signs of moving - ultimatum offered and no response. 12th Apr 18 at 3:56 PM
    Hi there,

    I'm just after a bit of advice or to hear is anyone has ever been through something similar.

    We had an offer accepted on a house that we absolutely loved in October and were told at the time that the vendors hadn't found a property yet (despite the fact the house went up for sale in the June). We didn't really mind because some people don't start looking until once they've got a buyer so we left them to it and were told in November that they had 7 viewings lined up so we thought something would come about. We didn't hear anything over Christmas and contacted the estate agent in January where we were told that they still hadn't found anywhere and were still looking.

    4 months later we said we were going to put the mortgage offer in and get the surveys done but we we're advised not to do this by the EA and vendor! After this we left them to it for 5 weeks hoping that the EA might contact us with an update rather then us having to chase them every other week but we heard nothing so we contacted them again to be told that the estate agent hadn't heard from them for a while and if we want to move soon we should look elsewhere. Please bear in mind that we have a buyer who we need to keep happy who has luckily been so patient, but our vendors and their estate agent don't seem to care.

    So 6 months since our offer was accepted and 0 signs of moving forward anytime soon - we offered them an ultimatum. We would increase our offer by 10k to the asking price on the grounds that we get a completion date set within the next 2 months or we will be withdrawing our offer. This was put to them on Monday. It's now Thursday and we have heard nothing!

    I'm getting increasingly fed up, especially because this is the first hurdle and we haven't even got to the hard part yet!

    Does anyone have any advise/ similar experience they could share?

    Thank you!!
Page 1
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 12th Apr 18, 4:03 PM
    • 3,818 Posts
    • 10,285 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    • #2
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:03 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:03 PM
    You won't be moving to this house I wouldn't have thought, time to start looking elsewhere. Well, that time was a few months ago tbh but better late than never!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 12th Apr 18, 4:04 PM
    • 26,128 Posts
    • 70,552 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:04 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:04 PM
    Have you seen anything else you've liked?!

    I think that's your answer
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Lolly88
    • By Lolly88 12th Apr 18, 4:05 PM
    • 316 Posts
    • 832 Thanks
    Lolly88
    • #4
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:05 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:05 PM
    You shouldn't give ultimatums unless you plan to follow through on them, you said you would withdraw so you should do that or accept that you will be waiting a long time and that might never sell. You can't force someone to sell if they don't want to. There are numerous threads on here on this very same issue so it might be worth a search but the basic precis is that if you want to buy a house you need to continue you search. If you like this house then don't withdraw your offer until you have had one accepted on another property in the unlikely event the vendors of the current house do start getting the wheels in motion. However the current vendors have shown their position there isn't really much else you can do.

    Good luck with it.
    Homeowner

    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 12th Apr 18, 4:08 PM
    • 11,143 Posts
    • 14,775 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #5
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:08 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:08 PM
    Agreed, you should have kept looking either from the start, or certainly from a couple of months down the line.


    They may well want to move - but they may also be totally deluded as to what they can afford which means wanting to and actually doing it may be poles apart. I've been in similar boats before - all have which have eventually sunk!


    Your buyer is not their problem, they owe them nothing. Should they move out so as not to upset your buyer? Chains collapse all the time - especially when they've never actually been formed in the first place. Alternatively, you could sell to them and either go into rented or try to play catch-up when you do eventually find somewhere.


    Good luck!
    2018 wins: Single Malt Whisky; theatre tickets; festival tickets; year of gin(!); shoes; Thai cooking stuff; Jo Brand talk; Slime Factory; Flawless tickets; Comedy night tickets; Triominos
    • westernpromise
    • By westernpromise 12th Apr 18, 4:27 PM
    • 4,263 Posts
    • 5,553 Thanks
    westernpromise
    • #6
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:27 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:27 PM
    They're timewasters. They waited for a bid on their house to see what they could afford to buy, they can't afford what they want, and therefore they aren't going to sell.

    Walk away.
    Buying a house, if you believe the market has a way to fall, or if you are paying sill asking prices ( like some sheeple ) or if you are buying in London, is now a massive financial gamble!!!!! - June 8, 2012 by TheCountOfNowhere
    • nicmyles
    • By nicmyles 12th Apr 18, 4:34 PM
    • 113 Posts
    • 140 Thanks
    nicmyles
    • #7
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:34 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:34 PM
    Yes, I had a very similar problem. It took us eight months from offer accepted to completion. In our case, there were significant problems further up the chain, but the vendor didn't accept they were potentially not resolvable quickly (there was a tenanted house further up the chain and the tenants wouldn't leave) and he needed to find somewhere else if he wanted to keep us.

    We were as stroppy as it was possible to be without actually issuing an ultimatum. We also started looking again as soon as the issues became clear and actually put an offer in on another property which was rejected.

    In the end we decided to have one last stab at it and told him it was exchange or withdraw by the end of the day. He exchanged and went into rented. But we would have withdrawn, because we were so angry by that point. And crucially, the EA believed us and probably helped pressure him into it.
    • kirtondm
    • By kirtondm 12th Apr 18, 4:52 PM
    • 230 Posts
    • 155 Thanks
    kirtondm
    • #8
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:52 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Apr 18, 4:52 PM
    agreed only issue an ulitmatium if you mean it. To be honest dosen't look as though they have any intention to sell which is why the EA is trying to steer you elsewhere.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 12th Apr 18, 5:05 PM
    • 17,386 Posts
    • 48,271 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #9
    • 12th Apr 18, 5:05 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Apr 18, 5:05 PM
    They're timewasters. They waited for a bid on their house to see what they could afford to buy, they can't afford what they want, and therefore they aren't going to sell.

    Walk away.
    Originally posted by westernpromise
    Sounds like the case to me.

    Your comment of you absolutely love the house could be the clue here - ie they absolutely love it too and arent going to move unless/until they find another house they absolutely love AND it's got more "plus factors" than their current one.

    They may well have been unrealistic about how much it costs for that "better house" they want. Probably along the lines of telling themselves "We can get it for 150% of the value of our current one" based purely on the fact that precisely one house came up at that price, but by and large it would cost 200% more for the "better one" they want. Well - those are example figures - but I'm guessing that's what is going on here.

    Much better to try and find another house where the vendor is being more realistic and appreciates what the "average" differential is between "what they've got" and "what they want" and, hopefully, just regards it as "A House - so offer me enough and you can have it tomorrow".

    It needs both those factors together. Eg I've got a "A House - so offer me enough" and no feelings involved about it/it's not a "love it" one and am realistic enough to know I'd need to be offered 200% of what it's worth to get "House that would be loved". Hence saying you need to take both those factors into account....

    Good luck with finding another one. In your position - I'd keep my offer in on this one "just in case" and have my fingers crossed - but I'd be on RightMove today checking out what other houses there are for sale.
    If you feel like you don't fit in in this world, it's because you are here to help create a new one.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 12th Apr 18, 5:29 PM
    • 3,154 Posts
    • 4,698 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    You don't offer ultimatums - you give them. And you don't give them unless you're willing to follow through on them, even if the outcome isn't the one you want.

    So it's now time to grow a pair and decide if you are going to walk away, or roll over like a lapdog and have them tickle your belly for months and months whilst they may or may not find somewhere else to live. Your choice.

    Suggest you get on the phone to the EA tomorrow (Friday morning) and tell them to tell the vendor that you'd be grateful for an answer by Monday morning (ie give them the weekend to think it over). In the meantime, ie over this same weekend, view some other properties with that EA. If you don't hear anything on Monday, never speak to that EA about that property again.
    • Doodles
    • By Doodles 12th Apr 18, 5:30 PM
    • 293 Posts
    • 441 Thanks
    Doodles
    Agree, these people are timewasters. How disappointing for you :-(

    They've kept you waiting for 6 months, and even with another 10K potentially in their hands, they are just ignoring you.

    Restart your house search tomorrow.
    We are in Transylvania, and Transylvania is not England. Our ways are not your ways, and there shall be to you many strange things.

    Dracula, Bram Stoker
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 12th Apr 18, 5:40 PM
    • 61,351 Posts
    • 54,590 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    We didn't really mind because some people don't start looking until once they've got a buyer
    Originally posted by HannahRakey
    There's little point in looking until one is proceedable. Nor is late Autumn or early New Year a great time to find a property. As new listings tend to dry up until the spring kicks in.
    Financial disasters happen when the last person who can remember what went wrong last time has left the building.
    • betsie
    • By betsie 12th Apr 18, 6:20 PM
    • 425 Posts
    • 418 Thanks
    betsie
    Sounds like a time waster I!!!8217;m afraid. There was an elderly lady on our road who liked the idea of downsizing and sold her house about 6 times over a 6 year period. She did eventually sell but sat outside the old house frequently looking in. Sometimes people don!!!8217;t realise what they!!!8217;re doing.
    I would start looking again and find a new house you love.
    • HannahRakey
    • By HannahRakey 13th Apr 18, 4:33 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    HannahRakey
    Thanks all for your comments and stories. I really appreciate it.

    We have kept our eye on Rightmove for the past 6 months and the more we looked the more we liked our house. We even went to view other properties.

    The vendors rejected our ultimatum so we've withdrawn our offer (or "grown a pair" as one of the comments read. They've put the house back on the market for 5,000 more then it was up for originally so are serious about selling but clearly not in a rush to do so.

    My weekend is now fully booked up with other properties and hopefully one of them will be 'the one'.

    Thanks again for your comments.
    • HannahRakey
    • By HannahRakey 13th Apr 18, 4:39 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    HannahRakey
    You won't be moving to this house I wouldn't have thought, time to start looking elsewhere. Well, that time was a few months ago tbh but better late than never!
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    We have been looking and have been to see other properties. None of them were right and I was comparing them to the one we had an offer accepted on because it is everything we need it to be.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 13th Apr 18, 4:46 PM
    • 3,154 Posts
    • 4,698 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    They've put the house back on the market for 5,000 more then it was up for originally so are serious about selling
    Originally posted by HannahRakey
    They're not serious about selling, they're seriously deluded about selling if they think that's gonna work. One wonders if they'll ever move....

    Anyway, best of luck with the new viewings - hopefully you'll see something even more perfect. And achievable.
    • hutman
    • By hutman 13th Apr 18, 4:48 PM
    • 100 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    hutman
    I've suffered this conundrum for a while. Offer was accepted but dragged on for eternity. Again, the vendors seemed infatuated with their house and were clinging on desperately in the viewing, which begged the question over the reason to sell. To my surprise, the chain became completed recently after some strongly worded emails to EA.

    To my mind, it is grossly unfair if you put up to sell but do not have the will to back it up. You will inevitably end up baiting out a enthusiastic buyer who will start getting all the positive emotions and more importantly significant upfront costs to get it moving.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 13th Apr 18, 4:55 PM
    • 3,154 Posts
    • 4,698 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    To my mind, it is grossly unfair if you put up to sell but do not have the will to back it up. You will inevitably end up baiting out a enthusiastic buyer who will start getting all the positive emotions and more importantly significant upfront costs to get it moving.
    Originally posted by hutman
    Alas exactly the same can be said of buyers (especially cash/investment buyers) who can bait enthusiastic sellers - or gazunder them at the last minute.

    Therefore, whilst the system isn't perfect, the imperfection is the same for both buyer and seller, so even, if not fair. Feel free to suggest one which works better for both parties...
    • Jaywood89
    • By Jaywood89 13th Apr 18, 4:58 PM
    • 160 Posts
    • 74 Thanks
    Jaywood89
    Sounds like you did the right thing walking away Let!!!8217;s just hope they don!!!8217;t end up wasting someone else!!!8217;s time and money, though I!!!8217;m sure they will.

    We had our vendor sell the property to someone else right under our feet even after searches and mortgage offer. Apparently someone had called offering more money so they pulled out the day before exchange!

    We!!!8217;ve ended up finding something even better at 40k cheaper, that we can really put our own stamp on and has room to expand as our family does. Hoping this one goes well.

    Don!!!8217;t worry you will find something better, and I!!!8217;d bet money they will still be chasing after their !!!8216;dream house!!!8217; stringing some other poor sod along

    Good luck
    • westernpromise
    • By westernpromise 13th Apr 18, 6:07 PM
    • 4,263 Posts
    • 5,553 Thanks
    westernpromise
    They've put the house back on the market for 5,000 more then it was up for originally so are serious about selling but clearly not in a rush to do so.
    Originally posted by HannahRakey
    I'd suggest that proves the opposite, Hannah.

    Your bid told them what a reasonable buyer would pay, which in turn tells them what they can afford next. They've worked out that based on what they now know their house is actually worth, what they can afford is less than what they want.

    So with a ready buyer, first they faff about for months without proceeding and then they increase the price. What they're saying is that if you don't buy them the house they want, they aren't selling.
    Buying a house, if you believe the market has a way to fall, or if you are paying sill asking prices ( like some sheeple ) or if you are buying in London, is now a massive financial gamble!!!!! - June 8, 2012 by TheCountOfNowhere
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,150Posts Today

7,134Users online

Martin's Twitter