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  • FIRST POST
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 3rd Apr 18, 6:51 PM
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    cjdavies
    Japanese knotweed has started
    • #1
    • 3rd Apr 18, 6:51 PM
    Japanese knotweed has started 3rd Apr 18 at 6:51 PM
    Been here for 7 years, never been a problem.

    Now to present right now, in starting to see what I believe is Japanese knotweed starting to grow through the gaps of the paving slabs, roughly about 5 about an inch so far.

    Any ideas how to get rid safely?
Page 2
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 25th Apr 18, 5:47 PM
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    Slinky
    Originally posted by Head The Ball
    You beat me to it!
    • usefulmale
    • By usefulmale 25th Apr 18, 6:46 PM
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    usefulmale
    Originally posted by Head The Ball
    That report claims that very low doses of glyphosate were used. Surely if you used the proper amounts recommended, that would work.

    Otherwise, it is like breaking a painkiller tablet into 8 pieces, taking just one piece and then claiming that headaches cannot be cured by tablets.
    Signature removed by ForumTeam again
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 25th Apr 18, 6:59 PM
    • 15,623 Posts
    • 43,357 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    That report claims that very low doses of glyphosate were used. Surely if you used the proper amounts recommended, that would work.

    Otherwise, it is like breaking a painkiller tablet into 8 pieces, taking just one piece and then claiming that headaches cannot be cured by tablets.
    Originally posted by usefulmale
    Again - thinking "There MUST be a way that works - even if it's one I personally don't approve of (ie chemicals)".

    Followed by second cynical thought of wondering just what level house insurance premiums would rise to if rather more houses landed up accidentally going up in flames (complete with their gardens).

    I'm only semi-joking when that thought crossed my mind.... - though I have a feeling insurance companies insist houses destroyed by fire get rebuilt - rather than "buying them off you" in effect - by giving you enough money to start up again elsewhere and forget House No. 1 existed.
    Like Frankie said - I did it my way.
    It's MY life......
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 25th Apr 18, 7:47 PM
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    shortcrust
    Originally posted by Head The Ball
    Dr Dan Jones said "Off the back of the first three years of data we've found that eradication is not possible..."

    I expect the actual report is a little more nuanced than that and talks about 'real world situations' and the like. It's still a very bold claim for a scientist. I wonder how he feels about the headline. Eradication is obviously possible (1000 gallons of herbicide, atom bomb, expansion of the sun etc).
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 25th Apr 18, 9:02 PM
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    Davesnave
    Dr Dan Jones said "Off the back of the first three years of data we've found that eradication is not possible..."
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    Err....I would expect complete eradication to take longer than 3 years. I would also think that after maybe 4 or 5 years it might not matter too much. Perhaps it would be like the horsetail in my old garden; a remnant from earlier times when there was a pond and a stream. Odd pieces came up, I zapped them and that was that....for a year.

    I don't see that it's a big issue, and certainly not a cause for panic measures and silliness. Even the best managed field will probably have ragwort, docks, creeping buttercup and thistles somewhere, so why do people get so precious about their gardens? Ah, yes, mortgages and so forth. Well, that's for sensible legislation, and I can't help you there.

    Once JK is under control, zap any bit that appears (at the appropriate time) and get on with your life. Maybe, like my old horsetail, there may eventually be a year when it doesn't appear.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 25-04-2018 at 9:06 PM.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 25th Apr 18, 9:10 PM
    • 3,124 Posts
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    Ectophile
    Hope it's ok to jump on this thread.

    I've got knotweed springing up at the edges of my garden (not unexpected) and my immediate problem is that it's in weed and rubble filled borders that I really want to clear and plant asap. There are hedges behind the borders so I'm guessing I can't use a herbicide. Is digging and sieving the only option?
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    You can get Roundup Gel. There's even an extra-concentrated "tough" version. You don't need to spray that, but I would recommend rubber gloves.

    But don't assume one treatment will kill it all. You could find new knotweed popping up among your new planting.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 26th Apr 18, 9:18 AM
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    shortcrust
    Thanks for all the replies. Very helpful and reassuring. I’m now strangely excited about managing the knotweed! Can’t wait to do some injecting in August on the areas I can leave and will watch the growth with grim fascination.

    Perhaps a naive question. On the ground I’m not disturbing will new shoots continue to pop up throughout the rest of the spring and summer or do you mainly just get a flurry of spring shoots?
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 26th Apr 18, 1:25 PM
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    DaftyDuck
    You will get a few smaller shoots close to the taller stands. You may also, by late summer, see some small, low-down clumps, which may show roof modules protruding.

    When you inject glyphosate into the stems in the autumn, you may well see these outlying clumps collapse as well. However, it may be advisable to spray with glyphosate a week after injecting. Gives the injected stuff time to translocate through the roof system, if it can get that far.

    Well after spraying, when it's all really showing signs of death, you can excavate these outlying roots and chase them back. Play "Time Team" and use a small trowel. Burn the roots where you find them, don't throw in bin, certainly not on compost heap!

    It is great fun (if not a Daily Mail reader) so long as it's not near your house. The second year, it will surely be back. Mark where it was with pegs, and spend the winter being a fireside warrior, planning solution strengths and spray directions for maximum efficacy.

    I did write a great long list on that "eradication " article, which doesn't mean what the Beeb imply, even got bored with myself, and deleted it!

    "Eradication", in the research project, means countrywide. Kill ALL Knotweed in the Uk. Eliminate! Eliminate!

    No sane scientist believes it is difficult to kill knotweed, and even some insane ones like me would concur! Knotweed is actually quite easy to kill, doesn't seed, and certainly isn't immortal. It's the way it grows, where it is found, that causes the problems.

    Remember, it was introduced as a bedding plant in the 1800's, prior to clever sprayers and toxins, and the grand houses growing it didn't fall down. Servile gardeners may have got more backache, had to tug a few forelocks and mumble "cernly, sirr, oil toidy up thar bush rightways" but Bertie and Rupert could still bash the croquet ball around billiard-flat lawns!
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 27th Apr 18, 9:02 AM
    • 1,905 Posts
    • 2,799 Thanks
    shortcrust
    You will get a few smaller shoots close to the taller stands. You may also, by late summer, see some small, low-down clumps, which may show roof modules protruding.

    When you inject glyphosate into the stems in the autumn, you may well see these outlying clumps collapse as well. However, it may be advisable to spray with glyphosate a week after injecting. Gives the injected stuff time to translocate through the roof system, if it can get that far.

    Well after spraying, when it's all really showing signs of death, you can excavate these outlying roots and chase them back. Play "Time Team" and use a small trowel. Burn the roots where you find them, don't throw in bin, certainly not on compost heap!

    It is great fun (if not a Daily Mail reader) so long as it's not near your house. The second year, it will surely be back. Mark where it was with pegs, and spend the winter being a fireside warrior, planning solution strengths and spray directions for maximum efficacy.

    I did write a great long list on that "eradication " article, which doesn't mean what the Beeb imply, even got bored with myself, and deleted it!

    "Eradication", in the research project, means countrywide. Kill ALL Knotweed in the Uk. Eliminate! Eliminate!

    No sane scientist believes it is difficult to kill knotweed, and even some insane ones like me would concur! Knotweed is actually quite easy to kill, doesn't seed, and certainly isn't immortal. It's the way it grows, where it is found, that causes the problems.

    Remember, it was introduced as a bedding plant in the 1800's, prior to clever sprayers and toxins, and the grand houses growing it didn't fall down. Servile gardeners may have got more backache, had to tug a few forelocks and mumble "cernly, sirr, oil toidy up thar bush rightways" but Bertie and Rupert could still bash the croquet ball around billiard-flat lawns!
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    Useful and entertaining! What more could I want?!
    • frugalmacdugal
    • By frugalmacdugal 28th Apr 18, 6:21 AM
    • 6,247 Posts
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    frugalmacdugal
    Hi,

    there was an item on BBC Breakfast yesterday about it, you might get it on BBCi.

    Read this.
    Y'all take care now.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 28th Apr 18, 8:04 AM
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    DaftyDuck
    That's the appallingly-written article we are referring to above. I would expect such trash from the Mail or Express, but hope the Beeb would do better.

    I repeat: Japanese Knotweed is easily killed, more easily than many other plants.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 28th Apr 18, 8:25 AM
    • 25,638 Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    I believe the next neighbour, I remember they had a jungle last year, all cut back down now before new tenants moved in. A mate mentioned it last year and told me what it was and I said I have never seen it here, just random normal weeds.

    Now I have the early reddish leaves growing right next to the wall of the neighbour.
    Originally posted by cjdavies
    One thing is for sure, you're not going to get rid of it without your neighbour's help. I'd be v cross in your position.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 29th Apr 18, 6:39 AM
    • 32,035 Posts
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    getmore4less
    Links to a couple of maps.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40899108
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Apr 18, 7:07 AM
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    Davesnave
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Yes they're maps; I'll give them that much.

    Unfortunately, they aren't likely to be accurate or up-to-date, though I suppose they show where the plant is more abundant... mainly in areas of high population.

    At least it gives the lie to those who say, "There's none in my home area!"

    The JK I know locally isn't on there, (I'm in one of those areas that "doesn't have any." ) When it comes to Himalayan Balsam, the huge infestations here, which the Environment Agency know all about, simply aren't on the relevant map.

    The same goes for Giant Hogweed and American Skunk Cabbage. I know where there's lots of both, but they're not there either.

    I'm not having a go; just pointing out that what we see/read is not always the full picture.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 29th Apr 18, 8:06 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    I think we know Britain is riddled with the stuff Dave - but I wasnt surprised to see that the areas of our country they state have a particular problem don't include the West Country.

    I know I've been told it's there (and I believe them) - but I'd never clapped eyes on it personally until I moved here (where I'm spotting the blimmin' stuff right, left and centre and no-one that gets told they've got it seems to give that much of a damn about it - and are always already aware of it - apart from those of us that have moved here and the vendor lied (ie didnt admit it)/their surveyor (inefficiency presumably) never told them it was in the garden).
    Like Frankie said - I did it my way.
    It's MY life......
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Apr 18, 8:12 AM
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    Davesnave
    I think we know Britain is riddled with the stuff Dave - but I wasnt surprised to see that the areas of our country they state have a particular problem don't include the West Country.

    I know I've been told it's there (and I believe them) - but I'd never clapped eyes on it personally until I moved here (where I'm spotting the blimmin' stuff right, left and centre and no-one that gets told they've got it seems to give that much of a damn about it - and are always already aware of it - apart from those of us that have moved here and the vendor lied (ie didnt admit it)/their surveyor (inefficiency presumably) never told them it was in the garden).
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Err....but according to the map, you have none where you are now?

    EDIT: ....And I don't think those in Cornwall will be too pleased if you exclude them from the West Country!
    Last edited by Davesnave; 29-04-2018 at 8:18 AM.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 29th Apr 18, 10:12 AM
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    getmore4less
    Yes they're maps; I'll give them that much.

    Unfortunately, they aren't likely to be accurate or up-to-date, though I suppose they show where the plant is more abundant... mainly in areas of high population.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Report your known sites to be added to the maps.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Apr 18, 10:24 AM
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    Davesnave
    Report your known sites to be added to the maps.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    I will, but it won't make a huge difference if those who are in charge of schemes to reduce these plants/improve the environment don't do likewise. Thy should know much more.

    For example, a charity with a bank balance of £2m have been giving grants in my local area for Himalayan Balsam removal, but the sites they have targeted aren't on the map......and it's still there.

    Better coordination's probably needed.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 12th May 18, 6:06 PM
    • 1,905 Posts
    • 2,799 Thanks
    shortcrust
    Hope it's ok to jump on this thread.

    I've got knotweed springing up at the edges of my garden (not unexpected) and my immediate problem is that it's in weed and rubble filled borders that I really want to clear and plant asap. There are hedges behind the borders so I'm guessing I can't use a herbicide. Is digging and sieving the only option?
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    Turns out the knotweed in my garden that my neighbours absolutely positively with no doubt whatsoever identified as knotweed.... is actually bindweed.

    All these emojis:
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 12th May 18, 6:58 PM
    • 1,517 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    Ruski
    Turns out the knotweed in my garden that my neighbours absolutely positively with no doubt whatsoever identified as knotweed.... is actually bindweed.

    All these emojis:
    Originally posted by shortcrust


    Neighbours, huh ?!


    Russ
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
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