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  • FIRST POST
    • keithgawler
    • By keithgawler 3rd Apr 18, 4:33 PM
    • 7Posts
    • 1Thanks
    keithgawler
    Reclaiming tax deducted from lender on PPI claim
    • #1
    • 3rd Apr 18, 4:33 PM
    Reclaiming tax deducted from lender on PPI claim 3rd Apr 18 at 4:33 PM
    I'd be grateful for clarification from those who have done it on the outcome of reclaiming tax deducted by a lender on a PPI claim. I have had a modest success with a claim and the statutory interest amounts to a few 1000's. I've found one thread on the net on the debtcamel website (sorry forum rules prohibit providing a hyper link but the rest of the web page is ppi-payday-refund-get-back-tax) concerning the process for reclaiming tax back from HMRC if either a non-tax payer or to get a refund up to the 1,000 tax-free interest limit we all now have (or 500 for higher rate tax payers) so I understand the process but just want to confirm how much I will get back.

    My expectation is to get back the tax deducted up to the "free" 1,000 limit from HMRC but the aforementioned link suggests I will only get 200 back and hence I've "lost" in my case some 300 of the c500 in total tax deducted in my case by the lender.


    Grateful if someone can put me right..........


    TIA
Page 1
    • BoGoF
    • By BoGoF 3rd Apr 18, 4:39 PM
    • 3,138 Posts
    • 2,427 Thanks
    BoGoF
    • #2
    • 3rd Apr 18, 4:39 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Apr 18, 4:39 PM
    If you are entitled to the 1000 savings allowance then the max you will get back is 200. If you have any other sources of interest that have been paid tax free then this needs to be taken into account.
    • Nearlyold
    • By Nearlyold 3rd Apr 18, 5:21 PM
    • 1,059 Posts
    • 888 Thanks
    Nearlyold
    • #3
    • 3rd Apr 18, 5:21 PM
    • #3
    • 3rd Apr 18, 5:21 PM
    My expectation is to get back the tax deducted up to the "free" 1,000 limit from HMRC but the aforementioned link suggests I will only get 200 back and hence I've "lost" in my case some 300 of the c500 in total tax deducted in my case by the lender.
    The 1,000 tax free limit is a limit on the interest you can receive before you pay tax. Hence any interest over 1,000 is taxed at 20% and the tax which would otherwise be due on the first 1,000 of interest is waived -which is why HMRC refund you 200.

    It does not mean you don't have to pay the first 1,000 of tax charged on interest which is what you mistakenly seem to believe.
    Last edited by Nearlyold; 03-04-2018 at 5:23 PM.
    • societys child
    • By societys child 3rd Apr 18, 5:27 PM
    • 5,198 Posts
    • 5,734 Thanks
    societys child
    • #4
    • 3rd Apr 18, 5:27 PM
    • #4
    • 3rd Apr 18, 5:27 PM
    Tax Form R40

    • Moneyineptitude
    • By Moneyineptitude 3rd Apr 18, 5:31 PM
    • 20,159 Posts
    • 11,102 Thanks
    Moneyineptitude
    • #5
    • 3rd Apr 18, 5:31 PM
    • #5
    • 3rd Apr 18, 5:31 PM
    My expectation is to get back the tax deducted up to the "free" 1,000 limit from HMRC
    Originally posted by keithgawler
    You need to understand that you would only get a refund of all the tax paid if you were a non-taxpayer and the Bank had deducted tax assuming you are a taxpayer.
    • keithgawler
    • By keithgawler 3rd Apr 18, 8:29 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    keithgawler
    • #6
    • 3rd Apr 18, 8:29 PM
    • #6
    • 3rd Apr 18, 8:29 PM
    Thanks all for the responses thus far which confirms what I thought to be the reality. I'm still wrestling with the fact that if I had received the 500 approx. interest gross then I wouldn't have paid tax on it so I don't really understand why I don't get the full amount of tax deducted by the lender refunded. I accept that I'm 200 better off than I would have been before the rules were changed for FY16 as a basic rate tax payer. Clearly my maths degree many decades ago has let me down with increasing age!
    • ggmf
    • By ggmf 6th Apr 18, 9:18 AM
    • 53 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    ggmf
    • #7
    • 6th Apr 18, 9:18 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Apr 18, 9:18 AM
    Sorry quick question, if as a non-tax payer in year 2017-18 you are charged tax on the interest from a PPI claim, then you can clearly reclaim the tax on form R40. If you do not submit a R40 claim, will HMRC finally work out that they owe you a refund at the end of the financial year and automatically refund the amount due?
    • ggmf
    • By ggmf 11th Apr 18, 9:31 AM
    • 53 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    ggmf
    • #8
    • 11th Apr 18, 9:31 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Apr 18, 9:31 AM
    Just bouncing this back up the board in case anybody can answer my question above please. Many thanks,
    • Moneyineptitude
    • By Moneyineptitude 11th Apr 18, 9:35 AM
    • 20,159 Posts
    • 11,102 Thanks
    Moneyineptitude
    • #9
    • 11th Apr 18, 9:35 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Apr 18, 9:35 AM
    If you do not submit a R40 claim, will HMRC finally work out that they owe you a refund at the end of the financial year and automatically refund the amount due?
    Originally posted by ggmf
    They may do, they may not. That's what form R40 is for, so why not just submit one? ..
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