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    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 3:25 PM
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    dunroving
    Guide for conducting a viewing?
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:25 PM
    Guide for conducting a viewing? 12th Mar 18 at 3:25 PM
    My house goes on Rightmove tomorrow and I'll be doing the viewings. I wondered if anyone is aware of any good guides on how to conduct a viewing?

    Having viewed a few properties myself recently, I have figured out some no-no's (one person hadn't hidden the big cat litter tray that was on the kitchen floor, eww), but I thought I'd try to seek expert advice from the helpful people on MSE.
    (Nearly) dunroving
Page 1
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 12th Mar 18, 3:53 PM
    • 7,655 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:53 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:53 PM
    Show them around then let them have a wander by themselves, have answers ready to typical questions (e.g. swot up on school catchment areas even if childfree), point them at agents for any negotiation rather than put your foot into it.
    • ceh209
    • By ceh209 12th Mar 18, 3:58 PM
    • 756 Posts
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    ceh209
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:58 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:58 PM
    I think you mean you're doing the viewings rather than EA for selling your house?

    I have just done this. Some guidance I got was:
    - Let people go into rooms first
    - If the rooms are quite small, don't go in at all.
    - Put lights on beforehand, especially if it's evenings and the lights are the type that take a while to warm up
    - Don't say anything bad about the neighbours even if you hate them!
    - Have something prepared to say when they ask you why you're moving or how much you're willing to accept pricewise
    - Say a little bit about the room rather than just what room it is e.g. 'This is bedroom 3, you can get a double in here but we prefer to have a single and use it as a study aswell' rather than 'This is the smallest of the bedrooms'
    Excuse any mis-spelt replies, there's probably a cat sat on the keyboard
    • walwyn1978
    • By walwyn1978 12th Mar 18, 4:10 PM
    • 450 Posts
    • 413 Thanks
    walwyn1978
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:10 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:10 PM
    I think you mean you're doing the viewings rather than EA for selling your house?
    '
    Originally posted by ceh209
    Of course it does. I'm a numpty. Mods, feel free to delete my earlier post on this thread, which adds nothing because I've read the question wrong. Apologies.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 12th Mar 18, 4:12 PM
    • 3,011 Posts
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    Smodlet
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:12 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:12 PM
    No brainer territory but make sure everywhere is clean and tidy; no clutter.

    I second ceh; take a tip from Escape to the Country: Show them around the ground floor but give them free rein to explore other floors unless there are safety/security reasons why this is unwise. If so, these should be addressed prior to viewings.

    Have every bit of information you can think of to hand/memorised. After all, you are looking to buy too; just put yourself in the viewers' position so gas/electricity/water costs; which way does the garden face; local amenities; nearest post office/pub/bus stop.

    Bone up (is that still allowed? ) on things like local transport services. So what if you never use them? You might sell to a couple, one of whom is a stay at home parent who does not have a car. Knowing how easy it is to access shopping and healthcare facilities can be a selling point.

    What are the local schools like? If they are good, cite names and Ofsted reports.

    Have answers to objections ready but be discreet with them. E.g. "This bedroom looks smaller than on RM/whatever", "But there is so much storage available". Don't start by saying, "I know this bedroom is a bit small but..."

    Good luck and please let us know how you go.
    Last edited by Smodlet; 12-03-2018 at 4:17 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 12th Mar 18, 4:17 PM
    • 3,011 Posts
    • 6,048 Thanks
    Smodlet
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:17 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:17 PM
    Of course it does. I'm a numpty. Mods, feel free to delete my earlier post on this thread, which adds nothing because I've read the question wrong. Apologies.
    Originally posted by walwyn1978
    Delete it yourself.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 4:31 PM
    • 1,163 Posts
    • 814 Thanks
    dunroving
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:31 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:31 PM
    Probably be lots of really good advice on here, but one I'd say is: if you realise it's not for you whilst looking round, say so (politely obvs) and then cut it short. Saves you time and saves the EA time, which they will also be grateful for - no point spending 30 mins they could be doing something else showing you a property you have no desire to take any further.

    Life's way too short to continue looking at a house you're not interested in any more because you're British and embarrassed to say so!!
    Originally posted by walwyn1978
    Actually, one piece of advice I found for sellers ;-) is to give a fairly quick tour round, and then let the viewers walk around at their leisure while you "disappear" (while staying within earshot to make sure they are not stealing the silver cutlery!). I guess that helps deal with what you are describing - they can just say No Thanks and shoot off at that point, or stay longer if they are interested.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 4:32 PM
    • 1,163 Posts
    • 814 Thanks
    dunroving
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:32 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:32 PM
    Show them around then let them have a wander by themselves, have answers ready to typical questions (e.g. swot up on school catchment areas even if childfree), point them at agents for any negotiation rather than put your foot into it.
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    Yes, agent (Yopa) said divert any negotiations via him, which I am happy to do, and is what I am paying him for.

    It's surprising how many people have already asked me how much I will sell it for. British obsession with house prices, I guess.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • walwyn1978
    • By walwyn1978 12th Mar 18, 4:38 PM
    • 450 Posts
    • 413 Thanks
    walwyn1978
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:38 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:38 PM
    Delete it yourself.
    Originally posted by Smodlet
    Done. They've obviously fixed the edit button to give you longer than when I last tried to edit something. Cheers.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    • 1,163 Posts
    • 814 Thanks
    dunroving
    No brainer territory but make sure everywhere is clean and tidy; no clutter.

    I second ceh; take a tip from Escape to the Country: Show them around the ground floor but give them free rein to explore other floors unless there are safety/security reasons why this is unwise. If so, these should be addressed prior to viewings.

    Have every bit of information you can think of to hand/memorised. After all, you are looking to buy too; just put yourself in the viewers' position so gas/electricity/water costs; which way does the garden face; local amenities; nearest post office/pub/bus stop.

    Bone up (is that still allowed? ) on things like local transport services. So what if you never use them? You might sell to a couple, one of whom is a stay at home parent who does not have a car. Knowing how easy it is to access shopping and healthcare facilities can be a selling point.

    What are the local schools like? If they are good, cite names and Ofsted reports.

    Have answers to objections ready but be discreet with them. E.g. "This bedroom looks smaller than on RM/whatever", "But there is so much storage available". Don't start by saying, "I know this bedroom is a bit small but..."

    Good luck and please let us know how you go.
    Originally posted by Smodlet
    Luckily, I am very familiar with the area, having lived here for 11 years, during which time I have used the buses frequently. ;-)

    It's a great wee village north of Glasgow, with all sorts of great amenities, excellent schools, library, two pubs, Co-Op around the corner, doctor's surgery around the corner with same-day appointments, low Council tax, very mixed vibrant community (my street made it onto the national news during the recent Snowmageddon, because everyone came out and cleared the snow away, made pots of tea, etc.!), stupendous views. So, I'm not short of positive things to say - just about every one of those questions above has a positive answer. If I wasn't selling it, I'd buy it myself!
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 12th Mar 18, 4:47 PM
    • 3,011 Posts
    • 6,048 Thanks
    Smodlet
    You will be fighting them off by the sounds of it, dunroving. At least those who like living within hailing distance of the Arctic Circle.

    You will do fine; good luck.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 12th Mar 18, 4:55 PM
    • 62,477 Posts
    • 365,926 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    Work out your route .... ending in "the best room".

    At the end of the viewing you'll be standing there having that final chat and they'll be looking round, so make it the best room or similar .... and not the room with the damp patch in the corner and the crack on the ceiling.



    You need to whip them past the grotty bits .... and let them linger in the better bits.

    Find out first what they plan to do with it.... no point whittering on about "top school round the corner" if it's a single bloke of 60 who was more interested in the size of your shed for his whippets. If you know what they've got in mind you can toss in some good points to fit that.

    e.g. "We love sailing and the club's round the corner". Point out: "The struts in the garage roof are ideal for storing all those extra sailing accessories out of season"
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 12-03-2018 at 4:58 PM.
    • keithdc
    • By keithdc 12th Mar 18, 5:17 PM
    • 285 Posts
    • 536 Thanks
    keithdc
    - Don't lie or be evasive (it is better for sale to fail early, than later on)
    - Decide if you want people to take their shoes off!
    - If you have kids, make sure they are out the house (it is really difficult viewing houses when the seller is trying to look after their children)
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 12th Mar 18, 5:18 PM
    • 1,714 Posts
    • 2,294 Thanks
    NeilCr
    Relax!

    Many, many moons ago my parents were selling their house. A viewing turned up on a day that they were both working. They asked me ((then 18?) if I'd do it for them. I didn't know that much about the house, I wasn't under pressure and I was light hearted.

    They bought the house and told my parents that the way the viewing was conducted helped them to that decision!
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 5:26 PM
    • 1,163 Posts
    • 814 Thanks
    dunroving
    Relax!

    Many, many moons ago my parents were selling their house. A viewing turned up on a day that they were both working. They asked me ((then 18?) if I'd do it for them. I didn't know that much about the house, I wasn't under pressure and I was light hearted.

    They bought the house and told my parents that the way the viewing was conducted helped them to that decision!
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    How close are you to Glasgow? And are you busy over the next few weeks?

    ;-)
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 5:48 PM
    • 1,163 Posts
    • 814 Thanks
    dunroving
    Although it's not a guide per se, I did find this very interesting thread, courtesy of Mumsnet.

    https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/property/1513267-any-tips-on-doing-your-own-viewings-What-do-you-look-for-as-a-buyer

    I found one of the posts very interesting (see my comments in bold!):

    "During viewings, all windows should be slightly open and all internal doors closed. Should all be closed in photographs

    Loo seats down, loo paper hotel-folded

    No loo brush

    No doormats

    No tablecloths

    No evidence of pets

    Cupboards clean on the inside and the fridge should be spotless and only sparsely stocked Huh?
    I'd never expect a viewer to look inside my fridge!


    Hang a designer dress or coat on the back of bedroom doors during viewings

    Remove family photos on tables for photography but re-instate them during viewings

    All books and DVDs should align with the edge of bookshelves

    Coffee table clear during photographs but staged during viewings

    There should always be a smart invitation on the mantelpiece (the stager used mock-ups!)

    A bottle of champagne should be in the fridge, especially if it's integrated into the kitchen units

    The dishwasher must be empty Yikes, again something I'd never have thought of. Guess I need to learn how to wash dishes!

    Every large house should have evidence of children, even if no children live there"

    Of course they missed the most important one (courtesy of my brother): "Make sure there are no skid marks in the toilet bowl" Priceless!
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 12th Mar 18, 5:56 PM
    • 7,655 Posts
    • 7,794 Thanks
    davidmcn
    "During viewings, all windows should be slightly open and all internal doors closed."
    Originally posted by dunroving
    Why closed? You'll just need to open them again! Think it helps to make the place look more spacious / brighter if doors are open.

    I'd never expect a viewer to look inside my fridge!
    Oh, they will. To be fair, if you're including appliances it's not unreasonable to make a cursory check of what condition they're in. And otherwise how would they know that there's a bottle of champagne in the fridge.

    "Make sure there are no skid marks in the toilet bowl"
    ...but I've never had a viewer lift the lid to check that!
    • googler
    • By googler 12th Mar 18, 6:05 PM
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    • 9,692 Thanks
    googler
    Do not offer any negative comment about your own house, the area, the neighbours, etc. Only open your mouth to express a positive attribute or something factual.

    Make sure the place is cleaned within an inch of its life. Make sure that anything the viewers are likely to handle or operate is in operational order. Door handles, kitchen cupboards, appliances, toilet (yes, someone WILL flush your toilet to "make sure it works"), wash basin, sink, etc.)

    As was said, finish and have your summing-up discussion in your best room; for small rooms, leave them alone in the room rather than crowding in with them; offer some comment ABOUT each room to introduce it, rather than a bland "This is the bathroom", "Here's the kitchen" (if needs be, sit down in advance and make a script), such as "We decorated the kitchen last month" as you guide them in, or "The bathroom was refurbished last year"

    Clear away anything of value that can easily disappear. Whilst you and your agent should have details of the viewers, there's no point in taking chances.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 12th Mar 18, 6:07 PM
    • 11,978 Posts
    • 74,938 Thanks
    kittie
    - Put lights on beforehand, especially if it's evenings and the lights are the type that take a while to warm up
    Originally posted by ceh209
    as a buyer I do not want to see lights on, that to me means dark rooms. I would be asking for lights to go off
    • googler
    • By googler 12th Mar 18, 6:11 PM
    • 14,777 Posts
    • 9,692 Thanks
    googler
    as a buyer I do not want to see lights on, that to me means dark rooms. I would be asking for lights to go off
    Originally posted by kittie
    Fine, as a viewer you can ask the owner to turn them off. But the seller should still put them all on before you arrive
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