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    • FEDEX
    • By FEDEX 12th Mar 18, 1:51 PM
    • 24Posts
    • 1Thanks
    FEDEX
    Party Award Survey -Structural engineer necessary?
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 18, 1:51 PM
    Party Award Survey -Structural engineer necessary? 12th Mar 18 at 1:51 PM
    Neighbour's having a loft built and RSJs put into the party wall.

    I've been issued with a notice, getting a PW award drawn up seems sensible.

    I was wondering whether the purpose of a survey prior to the award should/could involve an assessment of whether the proposed design will put the existing party wall at risk?

    I ask because I can't work out whether I should get an engineer to do the survey or someone without engineer qualifications (who would be cheaper). I've been told I should get an engineer to do it so they can work out whether its a safe design.

    Thanks to anyone who responds.
Page 1
    • botchjob
    • By botchjob 13th Mar 18, 11:53 AM
    • 256 Posts
    • 427 Thanks
    botchjob
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 18, 11:53 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 18, 11:53 AM
    I'd suggest you read up on the Party Wall act and what it means for adjoining owners. There's stacks on line (mostly written by PW Surveyors, which is designed to make the reader think an agreement is essential - it's not).

    How much do you like your neighbours? We're having some work done soon which required PW notices on both sides. One side were happy to sign and for the work to go ahead. The other appointed a surveyor, the cost of which is borne by us/the people doing the work. Which meant we had to appoint our own surveyor. Long story, short, it is costing us 5k in surveyors fees simply to excavate within 3 feet of their PW. As far as I can tell the Surveyors simply took a few photos, had some back and forth by email, and billed us for 5k between them. Nice work if you can get it!

    Needless to say we're not particularly happy about spending all that money unnecessarily. And obviously, should our dear neighbour ever wish to do building work which requires a PW notice, we will be sure to seek out the most expensive surveyor in the land.

    Basically though, if you just sign the PW notice you are still protected. If there was any damage/cracks, you can still appoint a surveyor, at your neighbours expense, to take the matter on.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 13th Mar 18, 11:57 AM
    • 25,202 Posts
    • 68,808 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 18, 11:57 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 18, 11:57 AM
    Your neighbour needs structural calculations for the steel that is likely to be insterted for the purposes of building control.

    There's no need for you to hire someone separate. If you want an award then the PWS will take those calcs from your neighbour as part of it.

    If they have served notice, they will be doing things correctly. Who has been advising you that you need an engineer?
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • GDB2222
    • By GDB2222 13th Mar 18, 12:35 PM
    • 14,441 Posts
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    GDB2222
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:35 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:35 PM
    Basically though, if you just sign the PW notice you are still protected. If there was any damage/cracks, you can still appoint a surveyor, at your neighbours expense, to take the matter on.
    Originally posted by botchjob
    You need a schedule of condition before the work starts. Otherwise, who is to say whether the damage/cracks are pre-existing?
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
    • botchjob
    • By botchjob 13th Mar 18, 1:23 PM
    • 256 Posts
    • 427 Thanks
    botchjob
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 18, 1:23 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 18, 1:23 PM
    Well, the schedule of condition for our build consists of a dozen photographs of our neighbour's walls and ceilings showing existing cracks. It's not beyond the wit of most people to take some pics oneself. The PW Act still protects adjoining owners if there was damage. And it would be the surveyors who would pass independent judgement on any damage, not the neighbours squabbling over what damage existed and what didn't.

    Our expensive experience of the PW Surveying business is that it's a racket. The PWA is a total cash cow for surveyors, who play on peoples nervousness and the fact the person doing the work pays 100% of the fees. It must keep Surveyors up and down the country with a very nice regular income.

    I gather that ambulance chasing Surveyors trawl through Council published planning applications, then mailshot adjoining owners touting for business with warnings of doom and gloom.
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