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  • FIRST POST
    • theGrinch
    • By theGrinch 11th Mar 18, 5:34 PM
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    theGrinch
    Party Wall objection
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:34 PM
    Party Wall objection 11th Mar 18 at 5:34 PM
    Can a neighbour's objection to PP or to signing a party wall agreement scupper plans?
    "enough is a feast"...old Buddist proverb
Page 1
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 11th Mar 18, 5:39 PM
    • 1,862 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:39 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:39 PM
    Can a neighbour's objection to PP or to signing a party wall agreement scupper plans?
    Originally posted by theGrinch
    Yes, if it prevents planning permission being granted.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 6:38 PM
    • 25,017 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 6:38 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 6:38 PM
    Not really. There needs to be good reason to object to PP under planning rules which planning officers would probably be aware of. It's a formality, usually.

    As for party wall, you can't just withold consent. Party Wall surveyors are there to make sure that things are fair. A neighbour can make things more expensive but they can't stop the building.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • theGrinch
    • By theGrinch 11th Mar 18, 6:43 PM
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    theGrinch
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 6:43 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 6:43 PM
    Thanks. Makes sense.
    "enough is a feast"...old Buddist proverb
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 11th Mar 18, 7:33 PM
    • 1,612 Posts
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    parking_question_chap
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 7:33 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 7:33 PM
    Not really. There needs to be good reason to object to PP under planning rules which planning officers would probably be aware of. It's a formality, usually.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Its a formality? What a sweeping generalisation.

    Dont you think it depends on what is being applied for?

    OP it depends on how the scheme compares to local and national policy.

    A formality indeed. Pah.
    Last edited by parking_question_chap; 11-03-2018 at 7:35 PM.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 8:06 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:06 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:06 PM
    Its a formality? What a sweeping generalisation.

    Dont you think it depends on what is being applied for?

    OP it depends on how the scheme compares to local and national policy.

    A formality indeed. Pah.
    Originally posted by parking_question_chap
    Planning Officers are educated and employed to know what local and national policy is. As are the architects usually employed to submit plans. A neighbour is not. The consultation of neighbours on a small scheme is largely formality. If they find something that the PO and Architect miss then there's some serious questions to be asked about the capability of trained professionals.

    Neighbour consultation is a formality, usually. I stand by what I say. Have a read through most neighbour objections - they contain at least 50% exaggeration, assumption, conjecture and irrelevance.

    Going back to the OP, neighbours don't scupper plans, only the application contravening planning legislation can scupper plans.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • the_r_sole
    • By the_r_sole 11th Mar 18, 9:29 PM
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    the_r_sole
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 9:29 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 9:29 PM
    Planning Officers are educated and employed to know what local and national policy is.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    You would think, but some I've had experience of recently won't make a decision if they get a couple of objections from "well known" members of the public (friends of councillors etc)
    Get's very old, very quick!

    But the general point is true, 90% of neighbour objections either aren't material planning considerations, or are bad interpretations of planning policy
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 11th Mar 18, 10:07 PM
    • 1,612 Posts
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    parking_question_chap
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:07 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:07 PM

    Going back to the OP, neighbours don't scupper plans, only the application contravening planning legislation can scupper plans.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Not just that.

    The application getting called into committee and the councillors making a decision based on politics rather than planning, that can be a another spanner in the works.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 10:12 PM
    • 25,017 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:12 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:12 PM
    Not just that.

    The application getting called into committee and the councillors making a decision based on politics rather than planning, that can be a another spanner in the works.
    Originally posted by parking_question_chap
    Did you read the OP? It was specifically about neighbours.

    Even the planning committee have to give valid planning reasons why an application is going to be rejected. Otherwise it gets overturned at appeal. The planning officers will push committee to get those reasons correct.

    Neighbours don't scupper plans. Planning legislation does.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • stevenway
    • By stevenway 12th Mar 18, 12:07 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    stevenway
    Steve the Party wall Surveyor here - the party wall act is a permissive piece of legislation, it exists to allow you to do something. Providing that you are undertaking works permitted by the Act - most works on a party wall or structure, work on a boundary or excavation to a certain depth close by then your neighbour cannot stop you doing the work. to exercise those rights you do need to serve a notice and, if your neighbour requires it, enter into an agreement
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