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    • dbrookf
    • By dbrookf 7th Mar 18, 12:02 PM
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    dbrookf
    What to plant?
    • #1
    • 7th Mar 18, 12:02 PM
    What to plant? 7th Mar 18 at 12:02 PM
    We have recently moved in and redesigned the garden layout but I need to plant something to grow tall (or is tall) and to block neighbours’ houses opposite overlooking...(reasonably quickly if possible).

    Any ideas please as I am not very green fingered at all?!
Page 1
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 7th Mar 18, 1:12 PM
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    Grenage
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 1:12 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 1:12 PM
    Are you talking hedging, or one single plant?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 7th Mar 18, 8:25 PM
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    Davesnave
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 8:25 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 8:25 PM
    And.....what is 'tall?'

    Will it need to be evergreen?

    Will it be in sunshine/part sunshine, or shade?
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • dbrookf
    • By dbrookf 7th Mar 18, 10:11 PM
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    dbrookf
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    Are you talking hedging, or one single plant?
    Originally posted by Grenage
    The fence is about 6’ tall and 30’ wide....so hedging or several plants??
    • dbrookf
    • By dbrookf 7th Mar 18, 10:12 PM
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    dbrookf
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:12 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:12 PM
    And.....what is 'tall?'

    Will it need to be evergreen?

    Will it be in sunshine/part sunshine, or shade?
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Tall ie 10’ ish, evergreen if possible, part sunshine....
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 8th Mar 18, 5:40 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 18, 5:40 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 18, 5:40 AM
    At 10' we are really talking trees, and most of those aren't evergreen, nor do they conveniently grow quickly to that height and then stop!

    The tree most people use in this situation is cypressus leylandii, which has a reputation like Staffordshire terriers, because unless it's looked after properly and given good discipline, it gets out of control and causes problems. I had 7 of them in my last garden, but not right on the boundary, so I could get all round and trim them every 18 months. They were kept at about 12' tall and no wider than 4' at the base and did the sort of job you describe beautifully. They took around a day to maintain if you count clearing up and disposing of the prunings, but a day every 18 months is way too big an ask for some (most?) people.

    But if you don't think you will want to prune them or can't put them back from the boundary, forget leylandii and their slightly more sophisticated cousin, Western Red Cedar. Also forget Eucalyptus species, which are even faster-growing.

    If you want this screen mainly for the warmer months when you are in the garden, rather than just looking at it from the house, then a range of deciduous trees could do a better job. For example you could buy 2 or 3 bog standard bare root silver birch for under £12 at present (but not in a month from now) and they'd do the job, or you could pay around £40 each for named varieties with prettier winter bark that would do the same thing in a classier way; rather like the difference between a Lexus and a Mondeo.

    But, although they cast less shade than most, silver birch will not stop growing at 10' nor will you be able to trim them, so the garden will need to be large enough to take them when they slow down at around 20'.....or you'd need to hire a chain saw.

    So, in short, some trees will get to 10'+ in a matter of 3 seasons, but they will keep going. There are many shrubs out there, evergreen and deciduous, that will also get to 10'. These are usually easier to manage than trees, but they may take 7-10 years to attain that sort of height, which could well be longer than you are in the house!
    Last edited by Davesnave; 08-03-2018 at 5:43 AM.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 8th Mar 18, 11:49 AM
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    andrewf75
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 18, 11:49 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 18, 11:49 AM
    Its a tricky one as it costs a fortune to buy large trees and the fastest growing ones (leylandii) are problematic as they grow too big. A good compromise I have found is Cotoneaster Cornubia. I only needed one, but paid £25 for an 8-ft one and it is supposed to be fast growing and semi-evergreen. In your situation with 10m I'd go for a few different things. Portuguese laurel or Photinia maybe as long as you don't mind them getting pretty big? Bamboo another option if you don't want to lose much space.
    Last edited by andrewf75; 08-03-2018 at 11:51 AM.
    • WeAreGhosts
    • By WeAreGhosts 8th Mar 18, 1:21 PM
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    WeAreGhosts
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:21 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:21 PM
    Laurel?

    https://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Cherry_Laurel_Hedge_Prunus_laurocerasus_Rotundifol ia.html#aPRLR
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Mar 18, 8:17 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 8:17 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 8:17 AM
    Its a tricky one as it costs a fortune to buy large trees and the fastest growing ones (leylandii) are problematic as they grow too big.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    A huge number of trees grow too big for the average garden.

    Cotoneaster cornubia, which you recommend, and which I'd not disagree with because I had one next to the leylandii, will grow to 20 feet, no problem.

    Just like the leylandii, mine had to be pruned. It was actually much harder to prune than the leylandii, because of its spreading growth habit.

    It's better for wildlife - we got redwings every year - but I had both trees for 20 years, so what I say about them isn't based on theory, but solid knowledge of containing them in a suburban garden.

    My Dad had one of the cotoneaster's many seedlings and he kept that at about 8' by regular pruning. It did look more like a lollipop than a tree though!


    So, what I'm saying is both can work, but the owners need self-discipline.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • safestored4
    • By safestored4 9th Mar 18, 9:18 PM
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    safestored4
    There are broader issues here which you need to consider. You may want to block the neighbours opposite from overlooking your garden
    but how will your planting impact upon them?
    • robin58
    • By robin58 10th Mar 18, 1:58 AM
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    robin58
    Leylandii have been sited in a few court cases as of late because they have caused issues of size and not being trimmed back.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
    The more I see, the more I know.
    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Mar 18, 6:19 AM
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    Davesnave
    Leylandii have been sited in a few court cases as of late because they have caused issues of size and not being trimmed back.
    Originally posted by robin58
    Yes, that sort of consideration was covered in my first post.

    Here is a clickable photo showing part our 20 year old leylandii hedge in 2008, standing beside a cotoneaster cornubia, which is also doing a privacy job. It's semi-evergreen, so can't find itself in court, and in any event, also protected by a TPO!



    People can make up their own minds which is larger and easier to maintain.

    (The other large 'tree' on the left is a pittosporum, sold to me in a yogurt pot for 20p, which took around 15 years to reach that size. It's also evergreen, but rarely mentioned in dispatches.)
    Last edited by Davesnave; 10-03-2018 at 6:55 AM.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • scottish lassy
    • By scottish lassy 10th Mar 18, 7:47 PM
    • 250 Posts
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    scottish lassy
    I have used escallonia for the same purpose. Quick to grow, evergreen, nice flowers and doesn't get humungous!
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 11th Mar 18, 12:48 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    It's a thug. It spreads through the slightest chip, through extensive root systems and gets huge. Oh, and it secretes substances that prevent other plants growing.

    It's an ecological headache - you could potentially spend every day of your life trying to cut down, pull out and generally keep control of the stuff at a tiny Nature Reserve near where I live - but it all started from one person choosing it for a privacy hedge for their garden.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • WeAreGhosts
    • By WeAreGhosts 11th Mar 18, 5:19 PM
    • 2,266 Posts
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    WeAreGhosts
    It's a thug. It spreads through the slightest chip, through extensive root systems and gets huge. Oh, and it secretes substances that prevent other plants growing.

    It's an ecological headache - you could potentially spend every day of your life trying to cut down, pull out and generally keep control of the stuff at a tiny Nature Reserve near where I live - but it all started from one person choosing it for a privacy hedge for their garden.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Had seven years of it as a hedge (about 40ft length, seven foot high), kept it in order each year or two ... never had an issue.
    • More4me
    • By More4me 14th Mar 18, 9:37 PM
    • 248 Posts
    • 6,923 Thanks
    More4me
    I am not a fan of leylandii, trees or thick bushy plants as a hedge, I much prefer evergreen climbers or Ivies.
    Plant 10' high posts across the boundry at set intervals, fix wire mash across the posts and let the climbers do their job. Climbers will be pleasing to the eye from both sides of the fence.
    More
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Mar 18, 10:07 PM
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    Davesnave
    I am not a fan of leylandii, trees or thick bushy plants as a hedge, I much prefer evergreen climbers or Ivies.
    Plant 10' high posts across the boundry at set intervals, fix wire mash across the posts and let the climbers do their job. Climbers will be pleasing to the eye from both sides of the fence.
    Originally posted by More4me
    This sounds theoretical for several reasons.

    Where does one buy posts that long, bearing in mind that about 2.5' would need to be in the ground?

    How thick would these posts be to withstand the huge wind pressure such a structure could be subjected to?

    Boundary fences are resticted to 2m or less. Taller fences need planning permission. Anything built to a height of 10' without proper structural advice might well be dangerous.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
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