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    • vertex
    • By vertex 7th Mar 18, 8:12 AM
    • 140Posts
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    vertex
    Whats the best jigsaw for novice?
    • #1
    • 7th Mar 18, 8:12 AM
    Whats the best jigsaw for novice? 7th Mar 18 at 8:12 AM
    Hi

    I need to buy a jigsaw for cutting up firewood (old doors, skirting boards, beams etc...).

    I currently have an electric chainsaw - but after borrowing a mate's jigsaw - I found it much safer, less messy, faster and less faff than using my electric chainsaw.

    1) What jigsaws are considered best value for money?

    2) What should I be looking for? (cordless etc...)

    3) Is it best to buy online or somewhere like B&Q?

    4) Anything/any makes I should avoid?

    Many thanks
Page 1
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 7th Mar 18, 9:29 AM
    • 4,126 Posts
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    Ebe Scrooge
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:29 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:29 AM
    A jigsaw isn't really the best thing for cutting up firewood. They're designed more for fairly detailed woodworking ( the clue's in the name - why do you thing jigsaw puzzles are so called ? )


    You'd be better off with a basic circular saw for cutting up doors, skirting boards, etc.


    Or if you want something really cheap 'n' cheerful, a decent bowsaw would suffice. Something like this should do the trick nicely :


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0001IX7TW/ref=s9_acsd_top_hd_bw_b27DrGR_c_x_w?pf_rd_m=A3P5RO KL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-3&pf_rd_r=940ES0NM8Z15ZBRQQEJS&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p =3a63d737-abb9-5dde-83a5-7a6c790840f4&pf_rd_i=1939003031


    One word of caution - I'd be very wary of burning the type of wood you describe. Odds on it will have been coated in paint, preservative, stain, all sorts of what-not to protect it. Could make for some rather "interesting" fumes when it's burnt.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • BananaRepublic
    • By BananaRepublic 7th Mar 18, 9:30 AM
    • 1,217 Posts
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    BananaRepublic
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:30 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:30 AM
    If the aim is to burn the wood indoors, in a stove or an open fire, then I would avoid using painted and/or treated wood due to the toxins therein. Wood that is treated with preservative can contain toxic metals, even arsenic.

    As for jigsaws, I have a basic Bosch unit, and it works well. Is it the best value? No idea. I like to buy in a real shop, making it easier to return an item if faulty. Places like B&Q can be competitive especially when they have offers. If you do buy a cordless unit, make sure the manufacturer has a decent range of tools that use the same battery. Batteries are expensive, and it makes sense to share them between tools. Sometimes places like B&Q have an offer whereby you get an extra battery 'free', or for a modest extra amount, well worth looking out for. My experience with cordless tools is that they offer convenience at the cost of power, and limited battery life before needing to recharge. A cordless drill is worthwhile, as you might be using it in odd places, but for a jigsaw I'd go for corded, not that I am any more than an amateur DIY dabbler, hence advice is to be taken with a healthy dosage of salt.
    • BananaRepublic
    • By BananaRepublic 7th Mar 18, 9:32 AM
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    BananaRepublic
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:32 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:32 AM
    Or if you want something really cheap 'n' cheerful, a decent bowsaw would suffice. Something like this should do the trick nicely :
    Originally posted by Ebe Scrooge
    I agree, they are good. A normal hand saw would be useful too, for fire wood you can get something with coarse teeth, the finish of the cut does not matter, and coarse teeth cut more quickly.
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 7th Mar 18, 9:43 AM
    • 4,126 Posts
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    Ebe Scrooge
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:43 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:43 AM
    I agree, they are good. A normal hand saw would be useful too, for fire wood you can get something with coarse teeth, the finish of the cut does not matter, and coarse teeth cut more quickly.
    Originally posted by BananaRepublic

    Agreed. I bought one myself last year for cutting down some trees. After much umm-ing and ahh-ing about whether to get a chainsaw, I opted for the bowsaw - couldn't really justify the expense of a chainsaw for the amount I'd use it. I'm very pleased with it, it rips through fairly thick trunks and branches very easily. Like you say, for firewood the finish is irrelevant, the coarser the blade the better, really.


    OP, that's another point I forgot to mention - I think with a jigsaw you'd find yourself snapping blades pretty often. Like I say, they're not really designed for heavy-duty work.


    I will just reiterate the caveat about being careful what the wood has been treated with. If you're talking about a bonfire outside, it's perhaps not such an issue. But I'd be very wary of what you burn indoors, if that's what you're intending.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 7th Mar 18, 10:12 AM
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    Norman Castle
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:12 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:12 AM
    To use one for cutting up firewood go for a larger motor. I'd look for a popular cheapie with a long warranty. Don't get cordless, pointless with a rough cutting jigsaw. Very important to use the right blade. Don't use cheap blades. I always use Bosch blades which stay sharp for a very long time and cut well. Buy blades designed for fast, course cutting thick timber.

    A circular saw would be better for larger or thicker timbers but they are much more dangerous.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 07-03-2018 at 10:18 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • DavidFx
    • By DavidFx 7th Mar 18, 10:46 AM
    • 221 Posts
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    DavidFx
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:46 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:46 AM
    Something like this would be better - good for pruning work as well.

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-erb373rsp-1100w-reciprocating-saw-240v/80388

    I use a jigsaw for cutting up pallets etc. as it can be used single handed leaving the other hand to hold the piece you are cutting.
    • shanto52
    • By shanto52 13th Oct 18, 2:39 PM
    • 2 Posts
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    shanto52
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 18, 2:39 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 18, 2:39 PM
    The Bosch JS470E 120-Volt 7.0-Amp Top-Handle Jigsaw is arguably the top functioning jigsaw out there for you to buy right now.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 13th Oct 18, 3:10 PM
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    Tom99
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 18, 3:10 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 18, 3:10 PM
    I have been using my Bosch jigsaw to cut up the smaller branches etc for firewood, up to say about 3in thick.
    As you say its a lot quicker and easier than a chainsaw for the small stuff.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 13th Oct 18, 4:50 PM
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    FreeBear
    Me, I use a circular saw to roughly cut up pallets, a cross cut mitre saw on straight(ish) bits of timber & branches. Sometimes use the electric chainsaw on pallets when the mood strikes. On large chunks of wood, chainsaw every time.

    Picked up an electric chainsaw sharpening gadget from lidl earlier in the week. Had forgotten what a delight it is to have a really sharp chain. Made short work of a Eucalyptus tree, and the wind helped to bring it down just where I wanted it to land.

    Will split the logs sometime next summer, and they should be ready to burn winter 2020.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Oct 18, 6:18 PM
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    Davesnave
    . Made short work of a Eucalyptus tree, and the wind helped to bring it down just where I wanted it to land.

    Will split the logs sometime next summer, and they should be ready to burn winter 2020.
    Originally posted by FreeBear
    A tip that was given to me by another MSEer is to split eucalyptus immediately, because it hardens up considerably as it dries.


    I left a couple of bits to see if he was right. Turns out, he was!
    "We won't get fooled again...."
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 13th Oct 18, 7:06 PM
    • 2,142 Posts
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    FreeBear
    A tip that was given to me by another MSEer is to split eucalyptus immediately, because it hardens up considerably as it dries.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Guess I'll be splitting logs and cutting the branch wood tomorrow as long as it doesn't rain.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 13th Oct 18, 7:09 PM
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    tonyh66
    reciprocating saw might be a better option.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 14th Oct 18, 3:04 AM
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    Tom99
    reciprocating saw might be a better option.
    Originally posted by tonyh66
    The problem with a reciprocating or circular saw it that they tend to be two handed tools so you would need to secure the bit of wood you are cutting.
    With a jigsaw, not only does the saw itself push the work down but the other hand if free to hold the work then move it along for the next cut - much quicker.
    Last edited by Tom99; 14-10-2018 at 8:27 AM.
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 14th Oct 18, 9:04 AM
    • 1,293 Posts
    • 899 Thanks
    tonyh66
    The problem with a reciprocating or circular saw it that they tend to be two handed tools so you would need to secure the bit of wood you are cutting.
    With a jigsaw, not only does the saw itself push the work down but the other hand if free to hold the work then move it along for the next cut - much quicker.
    Originally posted by Tom99
    having thought about it, you are probably right, a jigsaw is easier to manage.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 14th Oct 18, 9:06 AM
    • 7,686 Posts
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    Norman Castle
    The op started the thread in March and hasn't returned so clearly isn't interested.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 14th Oct 18, 5:37 PM
    • 1,293 Posts
    • 899 Thanks
    tonyh66
    The op started the thread in March and hasn't returned so clearly isn't interested.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    or cut their typing fingers off with a saw
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