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  • FIRST POST
    • brit1234
    • By brit1234 19th Dec 17, 9:57 AM
    • 5,191Posts
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    brit1234
    Problems: New build quality issues of big builders
    • #1
    • 19th Dec 17, 9:57 AM
    Problems: New build quality issues of big builders 19th Dec 17 at 9:57 AM


    The new homes 'uninhabitable' after less than a year


    Gas leaks, damp, holes in the floor and cracks in the walls - for some, their new homes have become "uninhabitable" less than a year after moving in.


    "Slugs, worms, beetles, spiders - they have their own personal entrance and exit route into our house," Karen Stacey-Pope tells the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42396938
    Big debate on quality issues on newbuild properties and the weakness of warranty on Victoria Derbyshire show today.
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Page 1
    • tykesi
    • By tykesi 19th Dec 17, 10:29 AM
    • 1,943 Posts
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    tykesi
    • #2
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:29 AM
    • #2
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:29 AM
    I'd never buy a new build. I haven't been in one yet which has had anything like the quality of most older houses and this includes budget new builds all the way up to "prestige ones". Thrown together on a budget, I'll stick to my solid 30's semi.
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 19th Dec 17, 10:47 AM
    • 369 Posts
    • 443 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    • #3
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:47 AM
    • #3
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:47 AM
    We've just bought a 10 year old place just out of warranty. Previous owners moved in from new and never had to exercise a guarantee in that time. But this is a one off build on the site of land sold from neighbours garden. It's in a Victorian conservation area so sympathetic in style and materials to neighbouring houses.

    We'd sworn off new builds too until we saw this. We've not been here long but can already see positives too versus the 1950s we moved from. Socket and cable points designed for modern living; retains heat brilliantly; layout suited to modern living; superb use of space.

    That said, the previous owners also made significant spec improvements to all the bathrooms and the kitchen/breakfast/utility, plus both gardens, and entirely re-floored the downstairs with wood and stone tiling.

    We're not planning to move again but if we did it would still only be to 'nearly new' and probably not on an estate.
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
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    • Jsnb88
    • By Jsnb88 19th Dec 17, 10:54 AM
    • 42 Posts
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    Jsnb88
    • #4
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:54 AM
    • #4
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:54 AM
    Doesn’t surprise me I have friends that have bought a 300,000 Home (very pricey for our area) and as a plumber I look in the bathrooms and the fittings they have used pronably amount to less then 300 it’s basically a budget bathroom that i would recommend to someone if they where skint but urgently needed a bathroom
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 19th Dec 17, 12:35 PM
    • 2,958 Posts
    • 4,291 Thanks
    NeilCr
    • #5
    • 19th Dec 17, 12:35 PM
    • #5
    • 19th Dec 17, 12:35 PM
    I’ve bought two new builds (this one was two years old but never lived in) and have had no problems at all.

    The first was a two bedroom flat in Lewisham - the second one a two bed house here on the Kent coast. I live by myself and don’t need anything huge. Both had/have designated parking spaces - invaluable in both locations

    Both have gone up in value - the sale of the flat neatly paid off my mortgage - and have worked really well for me and my best friend. He bought the flat off me and the likely profit is very good indeed

    This is all horses for courses and your own experience but, personally, I think it’s wrong to blindly write off all new builds as not good
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 19th Dec 17, 12:49 PM
    • 377 Posts
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    ComicGeek
    • #6
    • 19th Dec 17, 12:49 PM
    • #6
    • 19th Dec 17, 12:49 PM
    Typical lazy journalism by the BBC - it's certainly the case that quality on some sites is much lower than it used to be, but there are also many other sites that are much better than the older housing stock. You can't put all contractors in the same pigeon hole.

    People need to be educated on how buildings work, and what the appropriate process for snagging and identifying faults is - there are so many threads on this forum alone that would have benefited from a professional inspection service prior to occupation.

    I also think that there should be a minimum 7 days between practical completion of a property and occupation, so that detailed inspections and surveys can take place before the occupants move in. The developer should then be liable for any temporary accommodation costs until the property is fully completed - most problems I've seen are caused by developers rushing to get completion with unrealistic dates, and once the occupants are in the developer doesn't want to know.
    • matty17r
    • By matty17r 19th Dec 17, 6:36 PM
    • 1,199 Posts
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    matty17r
    • #7
    • 19th Dec 17, 6:36 PM
    • #7
    • 19th Dec 17, 6:36 PM
    Typical lazy journalism by the BBC - it's certainly the case that quality on some sites is much lower than it used to be, but there are also many other sites that are much better than the older housing stock. You can't put all contractors in the same pigeon hole.

    People need to be educated on how buildings work, and what the appropriate process for snagging and identifying faults is - there are so many threads on this forum alone that would have benefited from a professional inspection service prior to occupation.

    I also think that there should be a minimum 7 days between practical completion of a property and occupation, so that detailed inspections and surveys can take place before the occupants move in. The developer should then be liable for any temporary accommodation costs until the property is fully completed - most problems I've seen are caused by developers rushing to get completion with unrealistic dates, and once the occupants are in the developer doesn't want to know.
    Originally posted by ComicGeek
    Excellent post. Agree 100% especially the last paragraph concerning completion.
    • brit1234
    • By brit1234 19th Dec 17, 10:54 PM
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    brit1234
    • #8
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:54 PM
    • #8
    • 19th Dec 17, 10:54 PM
    On the Victoria Derbyshire show they suggested that new build owners keep 10% of the properties costs till they are happy all the issueshave been fixed. That wayit would force the builders to fix the problems promptly.

    Do you think this is a good idea?
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    • GrumpySO&SO
    • By GrumpySO&SO 19th Dec 17, 11:17 PM
    • 11 Posts
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    GrumpySO&SO
    • #9
    • 19th Dec 17, 11:17 PM
    • #9
    • 19th Dec 17, 11:17 PM
    Piffle. We have a new build and it's been great. The only problems we had were aesthetic.. bannister needed sanding, and a few knocks and bumps oh and the wrong kitchen being installed before we moved in but that was quickly fixed.

    We had a 5 year guarantee so any issues that did crop up a bit later have been fixed. Such as a small leak caused by settling and they even filled in the cracks in plaster that happens in new build.

    Trouble is you only really hear of horror stories.

    Sound insulation really good. We could hold a rave and neighbours wouldn't know it. House is really warm and lots of storage which is a whole lot different compared to the older houses we have seen.

    My mum's 1960's house has no sound insulation between walls and is freezing in the winter. Wall insulation retrospectively done caused mould.

    My grandma's old 30s house bloody freezing too.

    Rooms not a great deal bigger.

    Would we go for a new build again? Not for the current prices but yeah otherwise we would.

    My brother, a surveyor came around to look and said structure wise it was fine. A few nit picks and perfectionism mainly anesthetics that he as a builder (trained as before becoming a surveyor) said that in the past would have been picked up on.

    So yeah... Long as you do your research of course be build are ok to live in just hugely overpriced even with help to buy and ask the other FTB "aids". I mean the ones around here are going for quite a bit more than other older homes at the moment.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 20th Dec 17, 9:32 AM
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    LandyAndy

    My brother, a surveyor came around to look and said structure wise it was fine. A few nit picks and perfectionism mainly anesthetics that he as a builder (trained as before becoming a surveyor) said that in the past would have been picked up on.

    .
    Originally posted by GrumpySO&SO

    Nothing worth knocking yourself out over then?
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 20th Dec 17, 9:35 AM
    • 24,668 Posts
    • 51,988 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    On the Victoria Derbyshire show they suggested that new build owners keep 10% of the properties costs till they are happy all the issueshave been fixed. That wayit would force the builders to fix the problems promptly.

    Do you think this is a good idea?
    Originally posted by brit1234

    Well, the concept of a retention is everywhere in construction so in principle it seems like a decent idea. Percentage and retention period would need to be carefully considered along with a long stop date when the money could be released to the owner if works had not been completed.

    The builders would have to be sure the money was set aside and held securely by a third party though.
    • PokerPlayer111
    • By PokerPlayer111 20th Dec 17, 10:10 AM
    • 339 Posts
    • 128 Thanks
    PokerPlayer111
    Spiders? you cant lump that in with the other build problems, you may or may not get spiders in any house.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 20th Dec 17, 11:13 AM
    • 5,801 Posts
    • 3,809 Thanks
    csgohan4
    Spiders? you cant lump that in with the other build problems, you may or may not get spiders in any house.
    Originally posted by PokerPlayer111
    not when there is a large gap in your door letting them all in
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land/Estate Agents"
    • HWG
    • By HWG 20th Dec 17, 12:14 PM
    • 75 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    HWG
    We'd sworn off new builds too until we saw this. We've not been here long but can already see positives too versus the 1950s we moved from. Socket and cable points designed for modern living; retains heat brilliantly; layout suited to modern living; superb use of space.
    Originally posted by JoJo1978
    Yup! We moved into a small development in London by a local developer.

    It wasn't perfect, and we've had a few snags, but everything's been resolved and we're generally very pleased with it. I much prefer it over the pretty but draughty Victorian homes I've lived in.

    The problem seems to be with mass produced homes made by huge developers. Seems to me like the scale and pace of development means the contractors are spread too thin, and the company is too big and bureaucratic to tackle any endemic problems.

    I'd highly recommend a nice, modern building made by a smaller firm, but I wouldn't touch a Bovis home with a ten foot barge pole.
    • marlot
    • By marlot 20th Dec 17, 12:52 PM
    • 3,830 Posts
    • 2,974 Thanks
    marlot
    We've had two older houses, and two new builds. The most recent three years ago.

    Whichever you buy, you need to have a critical look before commiting yourself. If new build have a good look around the site as well as the house. A tidy site is a good start - it shows the site manager cares.

    Very happy with our new build.
    • PokerPlayer111
    • By PokerPlayer111 20th Dec 17, 5:43 PM
    • 339 Posts
    • 128 Thanks
    PokerPlayer111
    not when there is a large gap in your door letting them all in
    Originally posted by csgohan4
    Spiders could get in under door or letter box or just come in via your clothing unnotcied when they are small. In the UK they are pretty much a healthy thing to have around the house 99% of the time. Its just a strange thing to expect a builder to build a house spider proof haha.
    • New Build Sufferer
    • By New Build Sufferer 18th Apr 18, 12:36 PM
    • 2 Posts
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    New Build Sufferer
    Ongoing Problems
    I/We have ongoing issues, see how we are getting on thinking-of-buying-a-new-build.net
    • kittie
    • By kittie 18th Apr 18, 12:48 PM
    • 12,444 Posts
    • 79,027 Thanks
    kittie
    our last two homes have been new builds and have been fantastic but they were by small builders. Wonderful homes

    So now I need to move, are any of the big builders any good?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 18th Apr 18, 12:55 PM
    • 26,628 Posts
    • 71,454 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    Big debate on quality issues on newbuild properties and the weakness of warranty on Victoria Derbyshire show today.
    Originally posted by brit1234
    In other news, the pope poops in the woods. Or something
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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