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  • FIRST POST
    • racht70
    • By racht70 21st Oct 04, 7:11 AM
    • 53Posts
    • 4Thanks
    racht70
    heating and water
    • #1
    • 21st Oct 04, 7:11 AM
    heating and water 21st Oct 04 at 7:11 AM
    hi there....i was wondering is it cheaper to have the heating set on low heat alll the time rather then turning it on and off all the timewhen it gets too hot......also is it cheaper to have my water swited on all the time rather then turning it on say like when we need a bath or ect? thanks very much xx
Page 1
    • islandman
    • By islandman 21st Oct 04, 10:22 AM
    • 4,548 Posts
    • 1,782 Thanks
    islandman
    • #2
    • 21st Oct 04, 10:22 AM
    Re: heating and water
    • #2
    • 21st Oct 04, 10:22 AM
    This is an argument my wife often persues so I will watch and learn with interest. Also, she will often tell me NOT to constantly switch off lights as this can cause "surges".
  • new2it
    • #3
    • 21st Oct 04, 2:15 PM
    Re: heating and water
    • #3
    • 21st Oct 04, 2:15 PM
    Me too. I hear so many conflicting stories - more economical to leave the heating on low all day rather than switching it on twice a day when I'm home or vice versa. Totally confused about what I should be doing. Same thing with water. And does the argument for water on all day or not apply to both summer and winter, or is it different for each season?

    I look forward to reading some definitive answers!

    ???
  • loon
    • #4
    • 21st Oct 04, 2:19 PM
    Re: heating and water
    • #4
    • 21st Oct 04, 2:19 PM
    It Takes approx. 6kw/h to heat water and 0.5kw/h to keep it hot.

    It depends how much hot water you need to use.
  • new2it
    • #5
    • 21st Oct 04, 5:17 PM
    Re: heating and water
    • #5
    • 21st Oct 04, 5:17 PM
    I don't need a lot, but have a big storage tank. I live by myself, in a two bedroomed house and am out at work 5 days a week. Only need to wash dishes every night, approx 3 loads of washing each week and showers.

    Winter - I have to have the hot water on for the heating to work.
    • comdw
    • By comdw 21st Oct 04, 7:14 PM
    • 241 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    comdw
    • #6
    • 21st Oct 04, 7:14 PM
    Re: heating and water
    • #6
    • 21st Oct 04, 7:14 PM
    I was thinking of asking this very question and stumbled on this topic. Unfortunately I don't have a thermostat for the central heating (apart from the one on the boiler), but I do have full control of whether I have just heating, just water, or a combination of the two.

    As we have a dishwasher and an electric shower, we don't usually need hot water at all, although I'm sure the washing machine is more efficient if it doesn't have to heat up the incoming water supply (tangent question: should you run the hot tap nearest the washing machine until its hot before starting the machine so that it has hot water right away?).

    Mainly I'd be interested to learn whats best to set my boiler termostat on for the heating. At the moment its on 2 (out of 4). Should I have it lower with the heating on longer or all the time (don't forget the electric pumps that run the heating will be on more!), or should I turn it up to max and have the heating on for much shorter periods?

    I tend to think the latter is better, but have no scientific backup. Any experts on the subject??


    • purplepatch
    • By purplepatch 24th Nov 04, 12:16 AM
    • 2,524 Posts
    • 1,507 Thanks
    purplepatch
    • #7
    • 24th Nov 04, 12:16 AM
    Re: heating and water
    • #7
    • 24th Nov 04, 12:16 AM
    Bumping this up as its of interest to me - was about to ask the question. C'mon, any experts? Martin???

    Also, where does an immersion heater fit into the equation - we've got a switch in the airing cupboard that heats up the hot water, or can get the boiler to do it. Guessing the immersion heater is more expensive but not really sure why I think that.

    Also how long do you need to heat the hot water for to get enough for 2 showers and one kid's bath each day?

    As you can see, I'm totally clueless. Any help much appreciated.
    • MATH
    • By MATH 24th Nov 04, 1:19 PM
    • 2,931 Posts
    • 5,603 Thanks
    MATH
    • #8
    • 24th Nov 04, 1:19 PM
    Re: heating and water
    • #8
    • 24th Nov 04, 1:19 PM
    My immersion is cheaper to run than heating water by gas but this is the exception nrather than the rule cos I've got a really old inefficient boiler.

    To heat a full tank of water (5 showers and 1 load of washing - american machine using loads of H water) takes 1 1/2 hrs using my immersion. HTH

    In the summer I time the immersion to come on for 3 1/2 hrs on econ 7 during which time we all have showers and the tank re-heats for odds 'n' sods in the day. Do not ususally need to turn it back on in the afternoon. In the winter I have to use gas cos central heating will not run without hot water being on.
  • johncann
    • #9
    • 15th Feb 05, 2:55 PM
    Central Heating
    • #9
    • 15th Feb 05, 2:55 PM
    Is it cheaper to keep the central heating on low/med 24 hours a day, or putting it on automatically for 6 hours twice a day
  • johncann
    Heating Economy
    Can you please tell me is it cheaper to leave the the central heating on 24 hours a day, or putting it on for 6 hours twive a day?
  • swizzlebabe
    Which is cheaper on low all the time or as you need it?
    Someone has told me to put themostats on my radiators which I already have,but old some work,some don`t.
    And that if I do this and have them on low all the time it`s cheaper than just putting the central heating on for a few hours each evening. The central heating boiler is just for heating, have another for water.
    Has anyone done this?
    Don`t put heating on all that much,trying to save money, but it does get cold upstairs so do put it on for a few hours before kids go to bed. If it was on more, should I could dry washing on raditore etc which would save the tumble dryer.Buting having it on 24/7 6-9 months of the year seems alot. Ideas please.
    Just changed to London Energy which is supposed to be cheapest for me.
    JAN Grocery Challange 200
    Spent 154.88

    FEB Grocery Challange 175 21-1 to 20-2
    Spent to date 49.13
    • flea72
    • By flea72 19th Feb 05, 8:00 PM
    • 5,258 Posts
    • 5,263 Thanks
    flea72
    im no expert, but i would say that having it on all the time works out cheaper

    my main reason for saying this, is that a car does more mpg when cruising on a motorway, compared to doing lots of stop starts in town traffic
  • JasonW
    Also the water in the system won't cool so it only has to top up the heat rather than heat it from cold all the time. The boiler firing up a lot wastes fuel in the combustion process so that is the other side of looking at it.

    JW
    • MarkyMarkD
    • By MarkyMarkD 20th Feb 05, 12:36 AM
    • 9,795 Posts
    • 4,216 Thanks
    MarkyMarkD
    It's definitely NOT more cost-effective to leave your heating on all the time.

    If your objective is to keep the house at your chosen temperature, during the hours you need it, then the main determinant of the cost (given a particular combination of boiler and radiators) is how much heat is lost from the house. The rate of heat loss is related to the difference in temperature inside and outside the house. So you will lose less heat if the house is slightly cooler when you are not occupying it/don't require the heating on.

    Boilers also operate more efficiently (in general) when they are running continuously, rather than in a stop-start manner (as per previous posts). So it's better for the house to cool slightly, and the boiler to have to work harder to warm the house up again, than to have the boiler ticking over on-off-on-off all the time.


    BUT having said all that, if your previous strategy was to have the heating on full pelt, with the radiator valves all permanently open, and to toast the house up to a high temperature, then to turn off the heating and let the temperature run down, that WILL cost more than heating it to a sensible temperature (controlled by TRVs). But it's the TRVs that are the money-saving (and comfort improving) point here, not the leaving the heating on for longer.
  • Robert5988
    MMD is correct - without question!

    Jason made the point that

    "The boiler firing up a lot wastes fuel in the combustion process so that is the other side of looking at it. "

    I would point out that if you leave the heating on all the time the boiler is constantly shutting down and firing up again.
    Robert
  • swizzlebabe
    So I`m better just to put it on when i need it, and when I know I`ll be in all day etc?
    Sorry lost the plot a bit.
    JAN Grocery Challange 200
    Spent 154.88

    FEB Grocery Challange 175 21-1 to 20-2
    Spent to date 49.13
  • JasonW
    The only exception to the rule is probably when it is really cold and there is risk of freezing pipes etc.. having the heating on low is a small price to pay that your pipes will be OK I would think! I do not personally see the point of having heating on for the sake of it when there is nobody in apart from the above exception. You could time the heating to come at different times of the day ie before you get out of bed, before you get home from work, and possibly at some point through the night in the winter, its a personal thing.

    Im having a system installed in a few weeks and am going for a digital programmable room stat so you can set different programs for different days of the week for when the heating will come on and off, but also set the temp... so if I want in on all day when Im at work in winter, I can set the temp to maybe 12oC, and then boost to 22oC an hour before I get in from work for example. Well thats the idea at least.

    JW
  • Cagey
    I agree that the heating should NOT be left on all the time , relying on the thermostatic valves to control the temperature.

    The heating should at least have a timer to control the times you require the heating. I would also fit a room stat in the room which does not have a thermosatic valve(usually lounge). In this way you get the correct temperatre in the room which you spend most of the time. In theory the thermostatic valves should do all this but who sets them correctly & changes them as the weather changes ?.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 21st Feb 05, 11:50 AM
    • 4,715 Posts
    • 6,111 Thanks
    jack_pott
    Switching your immersion heater off for 8 hours each night, rather than leaving it on will save you 17p a year.
    I'm not upset that you lied to me, I'm upset that from now on I can't believe you.
    Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Robert5988
    Switching your immersion heater off for 8 hours each night, rather than leaving it on will save you 17p a year.
    by jack_pott
    Exactly 17p a year - not per night?
    Could you please give us your figures to prove that statement.
    Robert
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