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  • FIRST POST
    • GangBusters
    • By GangBusters 17th Sep 19, 11:22 AM
    • 21Posts
    • 14Thanks
    GangBusters
    I feel like I have no option but to lie about my work experience. Please help!
    • #1
    • 17th Sep 19, 11:22 AM
    I feel like I have no option but to lie about my work experience. Please help! 17th Sep 19 at 11:22 AM
    I worked in Tesco for 6 months then the Army for 1 year but since leaving the Army due to mental health after a family tragedy sent me into depression, I've been unemployed for the last 10 years so that's literally all the work experience I have, oh and I'm 30 years old.

    I've been to two job interviews, one for Morrisons and another for Tesco and I wasn't successful in either of them. I'm absolutely certain it's because A) I've been unemployed for 10 years and B) because I've had a long term mental health condition which is instantly a red flag to 99% of employers.

    I'm really trying to turn my life around, I'm a nice person, I'm super hard working and just want a chance... It took so much courage for me to apply for those two jobs as they were social based (customer service) but now I'm thinking to try a different area, perhaps warehouse?

    I was thinking to get myself a forklift licence but they're not cheap... The problem isn't the money, the problem is even if I get it and start applying for jobs, my 10 years unemployment gap will negate the active steps I'm taking to get back to work.

    I can't even really lie on my CV because employers are always checking references these days... I feel like I really have no option but to just gamble with lies. The way I see it is I can be honest (such a meme) and not get employed, or I can lie and have a chance at getting employed...
    Last edited by GangBusters; 17-09-2019 at 11:24 AM.
Page 2
    • GangBusters
    • By GangBusters 17th Sep 19, 2:07 PM
    • 21 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    GangBusters
    They wouldn't send people they feel may not turn up so I'm going to pretend you're going to be the first person they consider but you can definitely work with them to give you a chance.
    Originally posted by Exodi
    To be honest the only way a company or agency can give me a chance is to actually give me a chance...

    I can say I'm fit and eager for work all day long but if they have 20 other applicants who don't have a history of mental illness, well who would you pick... Anyways thanks for the advice, I'm going to try some agencies then.
    • MEM62
    • By MEM62 17th Sep 19, 2:32 PM
    • 2,898 Posts
    • 2,573 Thanks
    MEM62
    I can say I'm fit and eager for work all day long but if they have 20 other applicants who don't have a history of mental illness, well who would you pick... Anyways thanks for the advice, I'm going to try some agencies then.
    Originally posted by GangBusters
    Don't start selling yourself short before you get anywhere. You say you need to be given a chance so given the agencies a chance to give you a chance. In what part of the country do you live? Have you had any help addressing your mental health issues?
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 17th Sep 19, 3:53 PM
    • 1,059 Posts
    • 631 Thanks
    MarkN88
    Charity shops will bite your hands off and some with Aldo let you gain your L2 in Retail/Customer Service.

    I would also get on Indeed, the amount of Christmas jobs I’ve seen advertised I’d crazy.
    • GangBusters
    • By GangBusters 17th Sep 19, 4:02 PM
    • 21 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    GangBusters
    Charity shops will bite your hands off and some with Aldo let you gain your L2 in Retail/Customer Service.

    I would also get on Indeed, the amount of Christmas jobs Ive seen advertised Id crazy.
    Originally posted by MarkN88
    I know, it just freaking sucks that I'm in desperate need for a paid job yet I have to give my labour away for free. Volunteering should always be a side thing, for people who have a few hours of free time and want to contribute to their community. Not as a means to gain validation so employers will give you the light of day.

    I'll try agencies first and if no luck there then I guess I'll work for free to get some credibility.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 17th Sep 19, 4:14 PM
    • 4,645 Posts
    • 7,467 Thanks
    bouicca21
    But validation is exactly what you need. Why should anyone give you a chance after 10 years
    Sitting on my !!! feeling sorry for myself moaning that the world isn't fair
    without some evidence that you are actually prepared to turn up and do a day's work?
    • Sea Shell
    • By Sea Shell 17th Sep 19, 4:17 PM
    • 2,628 Posts
    • 4,740 Thanks
    Sea Shell
    I realise it seems harsh, and you say you're ready, but you've had 10 years without the structure and rules that come with work (both paid and voluntary).

    You need to be able to prove "you can do it", so chances are that means starting at the bottom, in whatever sector, thereby gaining a track record of reliability and work ethic.

    There are no shortcuts in the cutthroat employment sector.

    Good luck.
    " That pound I saved yesterday, is a pound I don't have to earn tomorrow " JOB DONE!!
    This should now read "It's time to start digging up those Squirrelled Nuts"!!!
    • tiger eyes
    • By tiger eyes 17th Sep 19, 4:26 PM
    • 934 Posts
    • 2,337 Thanks
    tiger eyes
    If you've only had two job interviews, I think it's too early to decide that employers won't hire you. Keep working on your applications and interview skills. Your local library probably has books available to study and the jobcentre should be able to refer you to specialist programmes to help the long-term unemployed get back into work.
    • GangBusters
    • By GangBusters 17th Sep 19, 4:35 PM
    • 21 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    GangBusters
    I realise it seems harsh, and you say you're ready, but you've had 10 years without the structure and rules that come with work (both paid and voluntary).

    You need to be able to prove "you can do it", so chances are that means starting at the bottom, in whatever sector, thereby gaining a track record of reliability and work ethic.

    There are no shortcuts in the cutthroat employment sector.

    Good luck.
    Originally posted by Sea Shell
    I guess this makes sense. Beggars can't be choosers and all that.
    • Ridgerunner
    • By Ridgerunner 17th Sep 19, 4:36 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Ridgerunner
    Have you looked at https://www.rfea.org.uk/jobseekers/early-service-leavers/?
    • GangBusters
    • By GangBusters 17th Sep 19, 4:41 PM
    • 21 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    GangBusters
    If you've only had two job interviews, I think it's too early to decide that employers won't hire you. Keep working on your applications and interview skills. Your local library probably has books available to study and the jobcentre should be able to refer you to specialist programmes to help the long-term unemployed get back into work.
    Originally posted by tiger eyes
    I applied to Tesco and I even used to work there before.... Doing basically the same job, left on good terms but they still rejected me.

    It's obvious they just don't want to hire someone who they think is going to have a mental break down every other week.

    This may seem outrageous but I honestly believe saying I was in prison for 10 years due to accidentally killing someone in a car crash would look better than 10 years of mental illness. Accidents happen after all, right?
    • Ridgerunner
    • By Ridgerunner 17th Sep 19, 4:48 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Ridgerunner
    You seem to have decided very early on that your mental health history is the reason that you haven't been employed and that there's little point trying. The positive is that you have got two interviews in the first place and I believe that competition for retail positions is quite fierce; lots of applicants for every job. You did work for Tesco before and left on good terms -but that was over a decade ago so cannot expect that to garner much goodwill today.

    As others have said, the way to prove that you are hard working, reliable and keen to work is by volunteering. Demonstrate a positive approach and determined mindset rather than letting the defeatist attitude that comes from your posts sabotage your prospects.
    • sazaccount
    • By sazaccount 17th Sep 19, 4:51 PM
    • 423 Posts
    • 392 Thanks
    sazaccount
    You said that money isn't really an issue to take courses (such as the forklift) Personally I recommend looking into getting your SIA security badge if its something your mentally/physically able to achieve.

    (personal anecdote) my Sh!thead of a cousin with no work experience, criminal background and general lazy a$$ had his initial SIA paid for by JSA back when they offered people courses to get them into work and hes found steady descent paying employment for the last couple of years yes hes not got rid of some of his behavior and lost a couple of jobs in that time because of not turning up, being done for misconduct (sleeping on the job) etc but I'm still surprised its something that hes kept up with mainly just working the nights on a gate to a factory.

    A friend manages a group of bar bouncers and is always putting shout outs on FB for extra people for busy student nights just SIA and black trousers/shirt needed.
    Thanks to money saving tips and debt repayments/becoming debt free I have been able to work and travel for the last 4 years visiting 12 countries and working within 3 of them. Currently living and working in Canada
    • GangBusters
    • By GangBusters 17th Sep 19, 4:57 PM
    • 21 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    GangBusters
    You seem to have decided very early on that your mental health history is the reason that you haven't been employed and that there's little point trying. The positive is that you have got two interviews in the first place and I believe that competition for retail positions is quite fierce; lots of applicants for every job. You did work for Tesco before and left on good terms -but that was over a decade ago so cannot expect that to garner much goodwill today.

    As others have said, the way to prove that you are hard working, reliable and keen to work is by volunteering. Demonstrate a positive approach and determined mindset rather than letting the defeatist attitude that comes from your posts sabotage your prospects.
    Originally posted by Ridgerunner
    OK it seems volunteering is the most agreed upon option. How much evidence (days per week, hours per day) etc do you think an employer would like to see before they think I'm ready for a paid job?
    • Blatchford
    • By Blatchford 17th Sep 19, 5:09 PM
    • 199 Posts
    • 260 Thanks
    Blatchford
    Unless you would like to add a dismissal to your barriers to employment, then you never lie.

    I appreciate that you are wanting to not feel sorry for yourself. So Id suggest stopping feeling sorry for yourself. Lots of people - start off with women whove been raising a family- have been out of work for ten or more years. Nobody walks back into any sort of job. You have advantages. Get yourself to MIND or Touchstone, or any other local mental health charities - nearly all of them will be able to direct you to support into employment, and that's if they don't do it themselves. There is shed loads of money storing this. Work and health programme - that is through the job centre. Ex-military organisations can also help, unless you were dishonorably discharged. There's no shortage of people and organisations who want to help you get back to work.
    • POPPYOSCAR
    • By POPPYOSCAR 17th Sep 19, 5:14 PM
    • 12,880 Posts
    • 28,627 Thanks
    POPPYOSCAR
    As you have been in the army why not approach the organisations out there for help and advice.

    https://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/armed-services-and-ex-services/
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 17th Sep 19, 5:48 PM
    • 10,100 Posts
    • 12,703 Thanks
    Owain Moneysaver
    OK it seems volunteering is the most agreed upon option. How much evidence (days per week, hours per day) etc do you think an employer would like to see before they think I'm ready for a paid job?
    Originally posted by GangBusters
    Depends on the employer (and the volunteering opportunity) but not necessarily that much.

    However if you get a reference from them saying Mr Busters always turns up on time, is reliable and hard-working, gets on well with people, and follows our procedures and instructions does it really matter if it's only 3 hours a week for the last six weeks? It's still a lot better than your current employer reference, which is non-existent.

    And it doesn't have to be charity shops although they're the most visible. Volunteering in an animal rescue shelter may not involve dealing with too many people, or there may be environmental projects where you can help repair woodland footpaths if you prefer more physical work.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • Carrot007
    • By Carrot007 17th Sep 19, 6:02 PM
    • 2,669 Posts
    • 2,305 Thanks
    Carrot007
    They wouldn't send people they feel may not turn up so I'm going to pretend you're going to be the first person they consider but you can definitely work with them to give you a chance.
    Originally posted by Exodi

    To add a point to OP with agency work (not that I had OP's issues). I found it best to ring them everyday and enquire what was available. If you seem keen they are more likely to place you as well.


    I was out of work for 6-8 months (long time ago, hard to recall). But After one job ended I really needed to focus on doing up a house I bought so I could move in! So I did that. After I though let's just get something quick and were constantly onto them. Worked a treat. If you are in their mind when canaceys come up you are ahead of the game!
    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 17th Sep 19, 6:23 PM
    • 6,229 Posts
    • 10,737 Thanks
    Gavin83
    It's obvious they just don't want to hire someone who they think is going to have a mental break down every other week.
    Originally posted by GangBusters
    Well no they don't. And honestly you can't really blame them.

    I really think you need to change your attitude on this. They don't owe you anything. You are frankly borderline unemployable at the moment so you need to start looking at how you make yourself employable. There are some great suggestions on this thread which you do seem to be taking on board and credit where it's due that's better than a lot of posters we get on here.

    Try to be a little more positive, have it as a target and you'll get there.

    This may seem outrageous but I honestly believe saying I was in prison for 10 years due to accidentally killing someone in a car crash would look better than 10 years of mental illness. Accidents happen after all, right?
    Originally posted by GangBusters
    In some ways it would. An accident such as the above is unlikely to reoccur. Mental Health issues could. Prove to them that you can work and you won't be dropping out after 5 mins and it'll go a long way.

    OK it seems volunteering is the most agreed upon option. How much evidence (days per week, hours per day) etc do you think an employer would like to see before they think I'm ready for a paid job?
    Originally posted by GangBusters
    Who knows, it'll depend on the company.

    My suggestion is this. Tomorrow I'd suggest looking into what volunteering positions you can take up. As Owain Moneysaver said it doesn't have to be charity shops, although if you're aiming for the retail sector it's not a bad idea. You could potentially find yourself in a position starting next week if you're quick.

    Volunteering doesn't stop you looking for work. I'd probably give it a month or so just to settle in but then you've got something recent to put on your CV and a reference to use. That'll look far more attractive to potential employers and you will find work at some point. I know it's easier said than done but try not to focus on the timescales of getting paid work. It'll happen and trying to focus on it too much will just add stress to the situation. Try and enjoy your volunteering position (whatever it is) and learn what you can from it.

    Also keep us updated. It'll be good to hear how you're doing.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 17th Sep 19, 6:57 PM
    • 6,019 Posts
    • 7,459 Thanks
    theoretica
    Another alternative is to speak to a company and ask if they'll take you on for an unpaid trial period before considering you for a job, assuming they're even allowed to do that. However it'll still be unpaid and at least with a charity you get the feelgood factor of helping out others.
    Originally posted by Gavin83

    It is illegal for companies not to pay minimum wage - unless you are volunteering at a charity.



    I suspect your first job will be in a fairly high turn over role, the company might be less concerned by the thought you might ned to leave. As mentioned the type of agency who fill short term roles might be a good place to start - extra people needed for busy season or cover of illness. Perhaps also look out for any temporary posts advertised.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 17th Sep 19, 6:59 PM
    • 1,059 Posts
    • 631 Thanks
    MarkN88
    https://do-it.org/

    Will help you locate opportunities.
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