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  • FIRST POST
    astep70uk
    Making my own butter! (merged)
    • #1
    • 29th Dec 05, 8:48 PM
    Making my own butter! (merged) 29th Dec 05 at 8:48 PM
    I've only just found this board as I am a regular on Grabbit, but thought I'd post this.

    For christmas I got the new River Cottage book, and it's fab!!
    One of the projects is making your own butter. Now I absolutely love butter, so thought I'd give it a go.
    The results are fantastic! Forget Lurpak, I'll be making my own from now on.

    All you need is double cream at room temperature, and a screw top jar.
    Fill it one third full of cream, and shake, and shake, and shake, and shake!
    You will go through the whipped cream stage, and it'll feel like it isn't moving, but keep going.
    You will eventually hear the sound change, and will make a lardy mass seperated from some milky liquid.
    The liquid is buttermilk, and the mass is your butter.
    Remove the butter from the container, and run under cold water until no more milk comes out.
    Then press it on a chopping board until no more liquid comes out.
    This is your butter!! Store in greaseproof paper in the fridge!

    On my third attempt I added a little salt as I like my butter salty, and it's delicious!!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 04-01-2006 at 12:08 PM.
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Page 1
    • sarahlouise210
    • By sarahlouise210 29th Dec 05, 8:57 PM
    • 3,163 Posts
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    sarahlouise210
    • #2
    • 29th Dec 05, 8:57 PM
    • #2
    • 29th Dec 05, 8:57 PM
    we did this as children and thought it was great fun (but hard work!) our reward was to eat it on hot toast cooked on a stick in the open fire ...ahhh they were the days!
    I have had brain surgery - sorry if I am a little confused sometimes
    • skintchick
    • By skintchick 30th Dec 05, 3:20 PM
    • 14,668 Posts
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    skintchick
    • #3
    • 30th Dec 05, 3:20 PM
    • #3
    • 30th Dec 05, 3:20 PM
    Surely more expensive than buying butter?
    DFW Nerd Club member 023...DFD 9.2.2007
    married 21 6 08 Angel babies' birth dates 3.10.08 * 4.3.11 * 11.11.11 * 17.3.12 * 2.7.12 My live baby's birth date 22 7 09 I'm due another baby at the end of July 2014!
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 30th Dec 05, 3:40 PM
    • 19,316 Posts
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    jobbingmusician
    • #4
    • 30th Dec 05, 3:40 PM
    • #4
    • 30th Dec 05, 3:40 PM
    Depends how much you pay for your cream - can be loads reduced to clear, this time of year
  • RachelD
    • #5
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:31 PM
    I can taste it now
    • #5
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:31 PM
    As a child I used to help my mother make butter. This was on our farm where the milk came fresh from the cow to a hand turned wooden churn. We eventually got an electric churn that looked like a very large glass sweetie jar. I think the aim of the rest of my life has been to find butter tasting the same as that home made stuff. You'd need unpasteurised milk or cream to come close - that's probably not an option nowadays with alll the regulations over unpasteurised products!

    However don't throw away the buttermilk - it makes the best lightest scones ever.
    if i had known then what i know now
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 30th Dec 05, 5:41 PM
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    Ticklemouse
    • #6
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:41 PM
    • #6
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:41 PM
    Can you freeze buttermilk? I have 2 cartons of double cream in the fridge (reduced to 19p each) and was debating earlier whether to make butter (I haven't really any need for that much cream) However, whilst I know buttermilk makes fabbo scones, I have so much stuff to eat in the way of cakes etc, I don't want to make scones just yet. I'm assuming you could just treat it like ordinary milk, which I freeze all the time?
  • foreverskint
    • #7
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:43 PM
    • #7
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:43 PM
    I can get unpatstuerised cream from my local farmers market, but so remember you can't eat this if you're pregnant or old or ill or a small child lol. That rules lots of people out .


    It is lovely, and tastes like cream used to taste.
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 30th Dec 05, 5:55 PM
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    jobbingmusician
    • #8
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:55 PM
    • #8
    • 30th Dec 05, 5:55 PM
    I have 2 cartons of double cream in the fridge (reduced to 19p each) and was debating earlier whether to make butter (I haven't really any need for that much cream)
    by Ticklemouse
    Can you make butter from cream that's been frozen? I would have thought that freezing it might alter the solid/liquid chemistry so that you couldn't? :confused:

    I'd be VERY careful re-freezing buttermilk that's been made from previously frozen cream - sounds like it might be a recipe for Listeria. Sorry for the bad news or if I'm being alarmist! :rolleyes:
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 30th Dec 05, 6:25 PM
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    thriftlady
    • #9
    • 30th Dec 05, 6:25 PM
    • #9
    • 30th Dec 05, 6:25 PM
    you can also use buttermilk as the liquid in breadmaking.
  • RachelD
    You could make the scones and freeze those.

    Rachel
    if i had known then what i know now
    • Ticklemouse
    • By Ticklemouse 30th Dec 05, 6:51 PM
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    Ticklemouse
    No - the cream isn't frozen. I just wondered about freezing the buttermilk after making the butter.

    I would rather freeze buttermilk than scones as scones are one of those things best made and eaten the same day. Mind you, I've never frozen scones, so can't comment on how it may or may not change them.
  • astep70uk
    Surely more expensive than buying butter?
    by skintchick
    Maybe, but I try to make as much as I can from scratch as my 3yr old son has a bad reaction to additives in food.
    Hi, we’ve had to remove your signature. If you’re not sure why please read the forum rules or email the forum team if you’re still unsure - MSE ForumTeam
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 30th Dec 05, 7:56 PM
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    thriftlady
    Are there additives in butter? There are no ingredients listed(except added salt)because butter is a raw ingredient like milk or cheese.It is just 'changed' cream.

    I sympathise with you wanting to make everything from scratch though as my dd has food allergies so I make from scratch too.I like The River Cottage family Cookbook too.
  • callansdad
    Surely more expensive than buying butter?
    by skintchick

    We buy the cream from Somerfields usually when it is on special offer. About a month back they had them for 35p each with your saver card so we bought up loads as the date on them isnt up until Feb 2006. It probably still works out a little more expensive but at least you know whats in it.

    I posted about this a while back on the debate about butter vs margarine. The Hugh books are great, im a fan of river cottage. Making butter is a lot of hard work though, we put it into our ice cream maker and it took hours to turn into butter. I do remember someone saying that it works in a food processor but i havent tried that yet.
    A banker is someone who lends you an umbrella when the sun is shining, and who asks for it back when it start to rain.
  • halloweenqueen
    Just to clarify (no pun intended!) I can make butter from double cream (excellent book by the way - got it for xms myself!). Can i freeze double cream if i find it reduced? can I then use whats left- the buttermilk for making cakes - but can't refreeze the buttermilk?
    I don't use a whole lot of butter except for cakes and i bought as a treat some italian butter made from cream and it was lovely! I then looked in my new book and saw the same thing about butter making, I remembered making butter from the top of the milk as a kid! Might be a double purpose and prevent bingo wings if i can keep shaking jars of cream!!!!!
  • astep70uk
    Are there additives in butter? There are no ingredients listed(except added salt)because butter is a raw ingredient like milk or cheese.It is just 'changed' cream.

    I sympathise with you wanting to make everything from scratch though as my dd has food allergies so I make from scratch too.I like The River Cottage family Cookbook too.
    by thriftlady
    Just checked some Asda Butter Spread in the fridge:

    Vegetable Oil, Reconstituted Buttermilk, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Salt, E471, Lecithin, Lactic Acid, Potassium Sorbate, Flavouring, Colour, Vitamin A & D

    Not so sure about pure butter as we have none in at the moment, however I do try to buy Anchor butter and cheese as they have no artificial colours or flavours
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  • kabie
    We only have butter because we don't like the additives in the other stuff!
    Got some double cream in the fridge, thought we were talking hours though? Anyone know realistically how long it would take by hand and do I need a container a lot bigger than the volume of cream ie I can't just take the unopened cream and shake that, can I?
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 31st Dec 05, 10:43 AM
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    thriftlady
    When I say butter I mean pure butter.Butter is a pure,natural ingredient and any 'spread' is the work of the devil-even if it has the word butter in it's name!

    Its a shame people use the word 'butter' to refer to these spreads,I've even been served spread in restaurants which I find unbelievable.
    • jordylass
    • By jordylass 31st Dec 05, 10:55 AM
    • 1,087 Posts
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    jordylass
    I was fascinated by this and will be looking out for cheap cream. A quick search found this way of making it with the processor. http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=113
    There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.
  • astep70uk
    We only have butter because we don't like the additives in the other stuff!
    Got some double cream in the fridge, thought we were talking hours though? Anyone know realistically how long it would take by hand and do I need a container a lot bigger than the volume of cream ie I can't just take the unopened cream and shake that, can I?
    by kabie
    Kabie, all I did was pour the cream into a container so that it was one third full of cream as you need the two thirds air space for it to move around - it is hard work with all the shaking but it's not so bad if you can take turns with someone - it can take between 10 and 30 minutes, and make sure the cream is room temperature and not straight from the fridge
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