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Slow cooker desserts esp rice pudd

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
7 replies 16.6K views
keatergreyhoundkeatergreyhound Forumite
491 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
Can anyone please advise me of any slow cooker derserts that I can make especially rice pudding. I would also need to know what type of rice to use please?
Also can you make the fruit part of a apple crumble in a slow cooker?
Thanks in advance.
2007 is my getting slim year
Total weight loss so far is 16llbs:T
Total to go 15 pounds:eek:
Not no more as im having a baby:D

Replies

  • sorry
    Ive just worked out how to search the site. Ive found out that I can do both so now im asking for amounts how long and how please.
    Sorry my mum never cooker. I lived on microwave meals and I dont want that for my daughter so im learning now
    2007 is my getting slim year
    Total weight loss so far is 16llbs:T
    Total to go 15 pounds:eek:
    Not no more as im having a baby:D
  • squeakysqueaky Forumite
    14.1K posts
    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Can anyone please advise me of any slow cooker derserts that I can make especially rice pudding. I would also need to know what type of rice to use please?
    Ingredients
    50g / 2oz pudding rice
    600ml / 1 pint milk
    25g / 1oz sugar

    1) Lightly butter the cook pot
    2) Place all ingredients in the pot and stir
    3) Cook on low for 2.5 to 3.5 hours.

    Pudding rice is definitely best.

    A good site for recipes, recently posted elsewhere, is:

    http://southernfood.about.com/library/crock/blcpidx.htm
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
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  • TrowTrow Forumite
    2.3K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    sorry
    Ive just worked out how to search the site. Ive found out that I can do both so now im asking for amounts how long and how please.
    Sorry my mum never cooker. I lived on microwave meals and I dont want that for my daughter so im learning now

    Good on you! Cooking is as straightforward or as complicated as you want it to be, and there is nothing to stop anyone cooking decent healthy meals on a regular basis.

    As for what kind of rice - 'pudding' rice is, afaik, the same as short grain rice.

    Good luck!
  • tifftiff Forumite
    6.6K posts
    Savvy Shopper!
    ✭✭✭✭
    I havent tried this yet, but I have it saved for when I get the chance.

    Peach Cobbler

    Ingredients:
    2 lbs fresh or canned peaches, sliced
    2/3 cups oats
    2/3 cup flour
    2/3 cups light brown sugar
    1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    3/4 cup softened butter

    Directions:
    Place the peaches in the stoneware. Combine oats, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg and pour over peaches. Add the butter and stir until crumbly. Cook on Low for 3 hours.
    “A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went.” - Dave Ramsey
  • mogginsmoggins Forumite
    5.2K posts
    Sorry my mum never cooker. I lived on microwave meals and I dont want that for my daughter so im learning now

    Just wanted to say well done for attempting it, my mum was a rubbish cook too and I never learned until I had my first child and was short of money. Don't ever get discouraged and if you want any advice just ask, there's always someone here who will help a 'learner'
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

    F U Fund currently at £250
  • tifftiff Forumite
    6.6K posts
    Savvy Shopper!
    ✭✭✭✭
    My Mum cooked proper meals, but relied on gravy granules and some stuff that we wouldnt necessarily want to eat nowadays. She also didnt have a wide range of recipes, just meat and 2 veg or spag bol or curry and that was only when my step dad came to live with us when I was 15 lol

    I am learning, I have always been able to cook spag bol and chilli from scratch and learned how to make roast potatoes from Delia when I was a teenager. I have expanded on that over the years, but in December I decided to push the boat out and cook everything from scratch. I do have cheat days because I had loads of packets and gravy jars in the cupboards which I am slowly working through but I love learning new things. Once you have repeated the same recipe several times you can move on to the next one because you wont forget it.

    Slow cooking is a lot of trial and error to start with, I couldnt understand why the sauces were so runny at first, but then learned to thicken sauces or reduce them on the hob and now have no problems with that.

    Good luck, this is the best place to be if you're learning to cook :)
    “A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went.” - Dave Ramsey
  • PalPal Forumite
    2.1K posts
    I have always cooked but mainly out of jars (chicken tonight type stuff). I then got into real cooking about 18 months ago thanks to the arrival of Pal_Junior and a Jamie Oliver book that I borrowed. JO's cooking is well worth a look because it is all simply "a handful of this, fry it for a bit until it looks cooked then add a pinch of that" rather than being an exact list of instructions to follow.

    I then read The River Cottage Meat books which is an excellent guide to how to buy and cook decent pieces of meat. Once you can do the roasts, meatballs, steaks, stews and lasagne everything else in a meal just falls into place.

    "Appetite" by Nigel Slater is a great book. Very simple to follow and a great reminder that sometimes all you need for a lunch is a bit of salad, some bread and a decent piece of cheese.

    Finally, River Cottage Yearbook gives tables of what is seasonal at the moment and how to cook it.

    Mrs Pal now complains that she can't keep me out of the kitchen at weekends!
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