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Recipe Collection Thread (recipe board)

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
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  • I've been busy working on recipes for two French classics, Onion Soup and Chicken in Wine. I will post then separately, as they probably need to be moved to different places.

    Again, they don't use any weird and wonderful ingredients that cost a fortune and you only use a 1/4 of a teaspoon of. Again, they are simple enough for even a complete novice to be able to do them.

    FRENCH ONION SOUP

    Serves 2

    INGREDIENTS

    1 stock cube
    500ml of boiling water
    2 onions
    1½ tablespoons of olive oil
    ½ a tablespoon of sugar
    ¼ of a teaspoon of ground pepper
    ½ a loaf of French bread
    50g of cheese

    METHOD

    Dissolve the stock cube in the water. Peel the onions, cut them in half and then chop them into thin slices.

    Put the oil into a saucepan on a low heat. Add the onions and stir. Put the lid on and cook gently for 25 minutes until soft and dark brown (caramelised). Stir frequently to stop it sticking.

    Turn up the heat to medium. Add the sugar and stir for 1 minute. Add the stock and the pepper. Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat until it is just boiling (simmering). Put the lid back on and cook for another 25 to 30 minutes.

    Cut 4 slices of the French bread on the slant. Toast it on one side under a preheated medium grill. Grate the cheese. Put the grated cheese on the untoasted side of the bread.

    Put the soup into a big heatproof bowl or individual heatproof bowls. Float the bread and cheese on top. Cook under a preheated medium grill until the cheese bubbles.

    ADDITIONS & ALTERNATIVES

    The traditional French recipe uses beef stock, but this makes an otherwise completely vegetable dish unsuitable for vegetarians. You can use a vegetable stock cube instead.

    Substitute 1 tablespoon of butter for 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add a finely chopped or crushed clove of garlic at the same time as the onions. Use brown sugar for preference, but white will do fine.

    Add ¼ of a teaspoon of ground allspice, ½ a tablespoon of white wine vinegar and a bay leaf at the same time as the stock. Don’t forget to fish out the bay leaf before serving.

    Use Cheddar, Edam, Emmental, Gouda or Gruyere cheese. Omit the cheese and serve with just the toasted French bread.

    Garnish with 25g (½ a 50g pack) of finely chopped fresh parsley just before serving.

    TIPS

    The trick with this dish is to cook the onions really, really slowly until they are until they are dark brown (caramelised) without burning them. Just keep an eye on them and don’t wander off.

    This soup can be kept in the fridge for 24 hours, or even frozen. Just reheat it and do the toast and cheese.


    EDIT: I've tested this one and it was a too sweet, so I've cut the amount of sugar to 1/2 a tablespoon and will do another batch. The colour was good, even with the vegetable stock cube. I was in a bit of a hurry and I didn't 'caramelise' the onions enough, either.
    The acquisition of wealth is no longer the driving force in my life. :)
  • CHICKEN IN WINE (COQ AU VIN)

    Serves 2

    INGREDIENTS

    750g of chicken pieces
    1 chicken stock cube
    125ml of boiling water
    2 rashers of unsmoked streaky bacon
    50g of button mushrooms
    1 clove of garlic
    2 onions
    1½ tablespoons of olive oil
    1 teaspoon of mixed herbs
    ¼ of a teaspoon of pepper
    ¼ of a bottle of wine

    DEFROSTING

    If you are using frozen chicken, make sure that it is completely defrosted before use. Leave it in the fridge overnight, or out of the fridge and covered for 6 hours.

    METHOD

    Dissolve the stock cube in the water. Cut each rasher of bacon into quarters. Wipe the mushrooms clean, discard any nasty ones and cut the end off the stalks. Peel the garlic and chop it into tiny pieces. Peel the onions and cut them into quarters.

    Put the oil into a saucepan on a medium heat. Add the. Fry the bacon, chicken and onions for about 10 minutes until it is golden. Stir frequently to stop it sticking.

    Turn down the heat. Add the garlic, herbs and pepper. Cook on a low heat for another 10 minutes.

    Put the contents of the saucepan into an ovenproof dish with a lid. Add the stock and wine and stir around.

    Cook in a preheated oven at 180°C, 350°F, gas mark 4 for 1 hour with the lid on. Add the mushrooms and cook for another 15 minutes with the lid off.

    ADDITIONS & ALTERNATIVES

    Substitute 1 tablespoon of butter for 1 tablespoon of the oil.

    Use a bouquet garni instead of the mixed herbs. It looks like a big tea bag with herbs in it, and stops them being left in the dish. Don’t forget to fish it out before serving.

    Use red wine for preference, but white will do fine. Add 1 tablespoon of brandy at the same time as the wine.

    Serve with new potatoes and green vegetables, or rice, or even a salad.
    The acquisition of wealth is no longer the driving force in my life. :)
  • I use these recipes from Delia for both those meals.

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/french-onion-soup,1308,RC.html

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/coq-au-vin,1168,RC.html

    Why don't you add them to the recipe thread Stephen? When you say you've been working on them,, do you just adapt them from an original recipe?
    Life is too short to waste a minute of it complaining about bad luck. Find joy in the simple things, show your love for those around you and be grateful for all that you have. :)
  • I use these recipes from Delia for both those meals.

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/french-onion-soup,1308,RC.html

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/coq-au-vin,1168,RC.html

    Why don't you add them to the recipe thread Stephen? When you say you've been working on them,, do you just adapt them from an original recipe?

    It's easier to let the board guides move them!

    What I like to try and do is to take a look at lots of different recipes for a particular dish, and amalgamate them into one, losing the ingredients which have just been added to be different, or are impossible to find. If I can't find it in a supermarket, it's out and I have to look for an alternative. (My chicken and sweet corn soup nearly didn't see light of day until I found creamed sweet corn in my local Tesco!)

    I also reduce them down to two, and no more than three servings for all my fellow "singleton" MSE-ers.

    I also test every one, and point out any simple pitfalls for the novice - like leaving in the bayleaf or bouquet garni, if used.

    The bouquet garni was a case in point - most recipes specified it, but one suggested using loose mixed herbs instead - it just means they are floating around the finished dish - so what? So I specify the cheaper mixed herbs, which can be used for other things and relegate the posh bouquet garni to the "A&A". The same with butter, which is now a luxury ingredient, instead of some of the oil.

    I also wanted to get a recipe for the onion soup that didn't rely on beef stock, a pet hate of mine.

    I also like to try and make then fun, as well. Other little things - the ingredients are always in the order you use them, so you don't forget any. The onions are always prepared last, in case they make you cry.

    Looking at recipes in such detail, it's amazing what you notice. One of the chicken ones specified an amount of butter, used some of it, but then there was no mention of using the other bit. Another had you add the stock to the pan and then pour it straight into the ovenproof dish. Why? All it does is make the pan heavier. So mine adds the pan to the dish and then adds the stock.
    The acquisition of wealth is no longer the driving force in my life. :)
  • It's easier to let the board guides move them!

    .


    Well luckily everyone doesn't think like that or the board would be a right mess. :rolleyes: The board guides do a fantastic job but surely we can help them by posting in the right place in the first place.
    Life is too short to waste a minute of it complaining about bad luck. Find joy in the simple things, show your love for those around you and be grateful for all that you have. :)
  • oliveoyloliveoyl Forumite
    3K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    How do you add a recipe to the index... I've just had a look and all I managed to do was open up about 17 different browsers lol.
    TOP MONEYSAVING TIP

    Make your own Pot Noodles using a flower pot, sawdust and some old shoe laces. Pour in boiling water, stir then allow to stand for two minutes before taking one mouthful, and throwing away. Just like the real thing!
  • rockie4rockie4 Forumite
    1.3K posts
    [FONT=helvetica,arial][SIZE=-1] I make these in muffin tins and get 6-8, they're VERY filling! I freze then re-heat for 5mins on medium in the microwave. Enjoy![/SIZE][/FONT]

    [SIZE=-1][FONT=helvetica,arial]100g/4oz onion, peeled & finely chopped
    • 15ml/1tbsp sunflower oil
    • 50g/2oz carrots, very finely
    • chopped
    • 35g/11/2 oz mushrooms, finely chopped
    • 50g/2oz red lentils
    • 600ml/1pint vegetable stock
    • 25g/1oz mashed, tinned red kidney beans
    • 35g/11/2 oz ground peanuts
    • 25g/1oz ground hazelnuts
    • 30ml/2tbsp shoyu ( soy sauce)
    • 15ml/1tbsp lemon juice
    • 7.5ml/11/2tsp dried thyme
    • 5ml/1tsp dried rosemary
    • generous pinch cayenne pepper
    • 7.5ml/11/2 tsp mixed spice
    • 200g/8oz fine oatmeal
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    [/FONT][/SIZE][FONT=helvetica,arial][SIZE=-1]1. Pre-heat the oven to 190°C, 375°F or Gas Mark 5 [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [SIZE=-1][FONT=helvetica,arial]2. Saut! the onion in the oil for 5 minutes, then add the carrot and mushrooms and cook for a further 5 minutes. [/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1][FONT=helvetica,arial]3. Now add the lentils and three quarters of the stock. [/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1][FONT=helvetica,arial]4. Blend the mashed red kidney beans in the remaining stock, add these to the pan with the nuts, shoyu, lemon juice and seasonings.[/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1][FONT=helvetica,arial]Cook everything, well mixed together, for a further 10 to 15 minutes. [/FONT][/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1][FONT=helvetica,arial]5. Then add the oatmeal, reduce the heat and simmer gently for 15 to 20 minutes, adding a little extra liquid if necessary. 6. Turn the mixture into a lightly oiled 1lb loaf tin and bake for 30 minutes. 7. Serve with mashed neeps and tatties. [/FONT][/SIZE]
  • I don't know if this was my Mum's invention but she used to make this for us when we were kids.

    Mashed potato
    Boiled egg cut in half widthways*
    Tomato ketchup

    Pile the mashed potato onto a plate in a 'mountain' shape
    Use one half of the egg, yolk side up, & push into the top of the 'mountain'
    Smother with lava (tomato ketchup!)

    * I seem to remember my Mum used 'not quite hard' boiled eggs so the yolk was still a bit runny & that mixed in with the ketchup gave a gorgeous orange lava!

    Cheap & filling & easy enough for kids to help make.:j

  • Penelope_PenguinPenelope_Penguin Forumite
    17.3K posts
    I've been Money Tipped! Best Buy Bear
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I don't know if this was my Mum's invention but she used to make this for us when we were kids.

    Mashed potato
    Boiled egg cut in half widthways*
    Tomato ketchup

    Pile the mashed potato onto a plate in a 'mountain' shape
    Use one half of the egg, yolk side up, & push into the top of the 'mountain'
    Smother with lava (tomato ketchup!)

    * I seem to remember my Mum used 'not quite hard' boiled eggs so the yolk was still a bit runny & that mixed in with the ketchup gave a gorgeous orange lava!

    Cheap & filling & easy enough for kids to help make.:j

    My DSis used to eat fried egg with ketchup and it still makes me <shudder> :o

    I'll add this to the recipe thread ;)

    Penny. x
    :rudolf: Sheep, pigs, hens and bees on our Teesdale smallholding :rudolf:
  • Simple and really nice..

    1 pork chop per person (preferably with bone in*)
    1 tablespoon Paxo sage and onion stuffing per chop
    1 cooking apple (or an eater if you haven't got a cooking apple)

    Season the pork chop(s)
    Cover each chop with the dried stuffing mix (don't mix with water, use it dry)
    Put a few slices of apple on top and bake!

    Serve with green beans and mash or a jacket potato, and some chicken gravy. I use gravy granules and sometimes add a sprinkly of paxo before adding the hot water.

    * the chop not the person
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