Fresh Yeast in Breadmaker

Hi All

I have today treated myself to a breasmaker (cheap one from Tesco's). The instructions in the cookbook are for dried yeast.

I have fresh yeast (got it free from Tesco's - thanks for the tip on that one) but i am unsure if i am to put the yeast on top like dried yeast or should it go at the bottom?

Please help!
Sealed Pot Challenge #601
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Comments

  • Seakay
    Seakay Posts: 4,265
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Forumite
    Thanks to faraway for this information:
    "I use roughly a walnut size lump [it is not too critical, but an orange size is too much]

    disolve in tepid water [again not critical, but not a pint either] with a level teaspoon of sugar

    Leave until it gets a "head" of foam [this will be about 15 minutes or so]

    For BM that want yeast in first, ignore and add with liquid last, use tepid liquid if possible to keep yeast going

    Fresh yeast is not suitable for use with timer as the yeast is live & active and will start the fermentaion / proving process at once"
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?t=66409&page=5
    post 91
  • Just swap it out like for like. Each bread maker is different so follow the instructions regarding where to put it.
    I just put in the bread maker as a lump, not doing anything to it.
    I also use the timer function upto 11hours and it's never been a problem.
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
  • Jazzy_B
    Jazzy_B Posts: 1,810 Forumite
    I do the same as Andy, and have never had a problem using the timer. You just have to make sure the liquid and yeast don't touch each other.
  • snow
    snow Posts: 127 Forumite
    Jazzy_B wrote: »
    I do the same as Andy, and have never had a problem using the timer. You just have to make sure the liquid and yeast don't touch each other.
    Sorry, but you must be joking?;) It is live yeast, they SHOULD be dissolved in liquid first! Even dry active yeast which are quite rare on supermarkets' shelves require dissolving with liquid, only dry instant yeast (the most common type now) is mixed with flour.

    I put liquid (water+ milk), sugar and yeast first, stir and wait for 10-15 min depending on the room temperature. Then (when the mixture is bubbled) add flour on top, salt and sometimes butter (depending on a recipe). I use cycle "Dough" and then when the dough is raised enough "Bake" (or "Cake" in some machines, it is 1 hour of baking, no coming-up in this cycle).

    Good luck!
  • snow wrote: »
    Sorry, but you must be joking?;) It is live yeast, they SHOULD be dissolved in liquid first! Even dry active yeast which are quite rare on supermarkets' shelves require dissolving with liquid, only dry instant yeast (the most common type now) is mixed with flour.

    I put liquid (water+ milk), sugar and yeast first, stir and wait for 10-15 min depending on the room temperature. Then (when the mixture is bubbled) add flour on top, salt and sometimes butter (depending on a recipe). I use cycle "Dough" and then when the dough is raised enough "Bake" (or "Cake" in some machines, it is 1 hour of baking, no coming-up in this cycle).

    Good luck!


    No joking here, just perfect bread.
    bread.jpg
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
  • culpepper
    culpepper Posts: 4,076 Forumite
    I dont see why you shouldnt just add it in as andy says. The breadmaker only keeps slightly warm in the first hour or so as it is kneading so wont kill the yeast and the water wont hurt it as that is what would have been used anyway to make it more liquid.
  • rippedoff3
    rippedoff3 Posts: 315 Forumite
    Andy wish mine looked like that!!

    Are you using a panasonic?

    I'd like to see some pics of fastbake bread, i'm sure mine could be better! :confused:
    I am using fresh yeast too, just thrown in at end, but feel its more the breadmaker than the yeast?

    Shelley
  • snow
    snow Posts: 127 Forumite
    No joking here, just perfect bread.

    I agree it looks good :), but what does it smell like? I'm sorry, but I really do not beleive that if you knead yeast directly into dough it will result in "perfect" bread:rolleyes: I bet it smell too yeasty... But maybe your machine is sophisticated enough...
  • Jazzy_B
    Jazzy_B Posts: 1,810 Forumite
    I've always used fresh yeast in my breadmaker. At first, I dissolved it in water, until I read in a post on here that someone used it in a lump undissolved. I tried it and it worked perfectly.No one noticed any change in the bread.
    It worked in a cheap breadmaker, and when I got my panny, I noticed the recipe book gives a recipe for fresh yeast bread. There's no mention in that that it needs to be dissolved first, unless I missed it.
    Just try it and see if you don't believe us!
  • I won't use dried yeast as I always think it's like the UHT equivilant to milk. When I did use it I thought it smelt slightly yeasty and tasted "home made".
    I then tried just putting the fresh yeast as a direct replacement and it tastes and smells just like ASDA bakery at 7am.
    I use a panasonic which you stick the yeast in first then flour over it then water so it stays dry until the time it is mixed.

    Never had a problem and loaf always looks like my photo. It could just be panasonic.
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
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