Taking a car battery on a tfl bus

Does anyone know please if you are allowed to take a car battery on a bus? 

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  • Grumpy_chap
    Grumpy_chap Posts: 14,427
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    Matty246 said:
    Does anyone know please if you are allowed to take a car battery on a bus? 
    I can't see any rules against it:
    https://content.tfl.gov.uk/tfl-conditions-of-carriage.pdf
  • molerat
    molerat Posts: 31,557
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    edited 7 November 2023 at 7:47PM
    Matty246 said:
    Does anyone know please if you are allowed to take a car battery on a bus? 
    I can't see any rules against it:
    https://content.tfl.gov.uk/tfl-conditions-of-carriage.pdf
    But that also does not mention thermo nuclear devices :)
    It does though reference The Public Service Vehicle (......) Regulations 1990 which states
    (4) The article or substance referred to in paragraph (2) is–

    (a)any bulky or cumbersome article;

    (b)any article or substance which causes or is likely to cause annoyance to any person on the vehicle; or

    (c)any article or substance which would be reasonably expected to constitute–

    (i)a risk of injury to any person on the vehicle; or

    (ii)a risk of damage to the property of any person on the vehicle or to the vehicle.
    Which could easily cover a car battery.  If it is carried in a holdall of some description I doubt there would be a problem.

  • la531983
    la531983 Posts: 1,672
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    I mean, who is to know you have it if it's in a bag? 
  • Matty246
    Matty246 Posts: 14
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    Thanks all
  • martindow
    martindow Posts: 10,178
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    I've taken a car battery on a bus before although not in London.  The drivers didn't complain, but I wouldn't want to do it again.  After carrying it to and from the bus my arms were nearly falling off.
  • I would suggest that you shouldn't take any lead-acid battery that isn't either 
    • Sealed in packaging to ensure that the liquid contents can't spill (i.e. new from the shops or expertly wrapped)
    • or is a "sealed unit" type of battery which is spill proof by design
    Battery acid is no joke if it gets on skin.  So taking a old reclaimed lead acid battery of any size (which could spill) is not a good idea, even if its obscured in a bag or box.

    From the rules presented above I would say legally you should not, but that would be up to a court to decide if there was an injury incident (interpretation/tort) or the operator has their own conditions of carriage/policy which prohibits (up to the driver to enforce by not allowing you to travel, and probably within rights to deny travel). 

    I would suggest similar for trains, coaches.
  • Am I missing something, how would they know ?.
    Did you tell the driver.
    Hello drive I have a thermonuclear device in my bag, a severed head and 4 cans of wife beater.
    Plus an AK47.
    To be serious, the last battery I purchased was from Halfords and as I couldn’t start the car it was taken home on the bus.
  • If the driver refuses, you could mention the fact that the bus is already carrying a motor vehicle battery....
  • EnPointe
    EnPointe Posts: 254
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    nottsphil said:
    If the driver refuses, you could mention the fact that the bus is already carrying a motor vehicle battery....
    but not 

    1. Unrestrained
    2. in the passenger  areas of the vehicle 
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