Asda"s online prices

It appears that Asda have different prices on some things if they are bought instore. I went in today and noticed several things that \i buy regularly at a lower price.

The 1.2 kilo pears are £2 online £1.60 instore, Oranges £2.40 online £2.20 instore. Tomatoes £0.70 instore £0.75 online. Did notice the tomatoes some weeks ago but thought it was probably a mistake. Did not check any other things only noticed these because I was buying the

I know the fuel costs have risen but we still pay a delivery charge. If they need to put that charge up I would accept it but charging different prices I find sneaky. At least they should tell customers what they are doing.
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  • yvonne13_2
    yvonne13_2 Posts: 1,955 Forumite
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    millie said:
    It appears that Asda have different prices on some things if they are bought instore. I went in today and noticed several things that \i buy regularly at a lower price.

    The 1.2 kilo pears are £2 online £1.60 instore, Oranges £2.40 online £2.20 instore. Tomatoes £0.70 instore £0.75 online. Did notice the tomatoes some weeks ago but thought it was probably a mistake. Did not check any other things only noticed these because I was buying the

    I know the fuel costs have risen but we still pay a delivery charge. If they need to put that charge up I would accept it but charging different prices I find sneaky. At least they should tell customers what they are doing.
     Unfortunatly the Asda app doesn't have nominated store as a "check stock availibility" so the prices will always be different. The only app I know which gives you live stock availiblity and store prices is Tesco. Hopefully all other supermarkets will start doing the same, but I doubt it as most hope you'll come into the store for a product they don't have or possibly stock in the hope you will still buy something.
    It's better to regret something I did do than to regret something that I didn’t. :EasterBun
  • arnoldy
    arnoldy Posts: 505 Forumite
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    millie said:


    I know the fuel costs have risen but we still pay a delivery charge. 
    Do not forget that online shopping means that the supermarkets dont have to suffer the loss from Shoplifters, this together with the delivery charge should offset the picking and delivery costs, you would have thought. The sticky fingers brigade is rife in the UK, and as ever its paid for by the rest of us, including those on modest budgets. 

    A crack down would lower all our costs. This could be done by technology in, and at the entrance/exit, to supermarkets. 
  • elsien
    elsien Posts: 32,636 Forumite
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    edited 20 July 2022 at 9:02AM
    It’s not a lot different to Tesco (and probably others) charging higher prices in their convenience stores from the larger stores.
    And some online prices are cheaper to instore. Swings and roundabouts. 
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • Farway
    Farway Posts: 13,178 Forumite
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    arnoldy said:
    millie said:


    I know the fuel costs have risen but we still pay a delivery charge. 
    Do not forget that online shopping means that the supermarkets dont have to suffer the loss from Shoplifters, this together with the delivery charge should offset the picking and delivery costs, you would have thought. The sticky fingers brigade is rife in the UK, and as ever its paid for by the rest of us, including those on modest budgets. 

    A crack down would lower all our costs. This could be done by technology in, and at the entrance/exit, to supermarkets. 

    It already is, hence the RIFD tags on razor blades, joints of meat and maybe by now packets of Lurpack, however unless it gets to tagging every cauliflower or bar of chocolate it will not be cost-effective.

    An investigation a while back found most theft from shops is by staff, some small scale like snacking on some biscuits down to lory loads wrongly invoiced
    Eight out of ten owners who expressed a preference said their cats preferred other peoples gardens
  • arnoldy
    arnoldy Posts: 505 Forumite
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    Farway said:

    It already is, hence the RIFD tags on razor blades, joints of meat and maybe by now packets of Lurpack, however unless it gets to tagging every cauliflower or bar of chocolate it will not be cost-effective.

    Yes agreed, that's not cost effective. But the pareto applies here, probably 90% of theft is accounted for by a very small % of people. But if technology can identify these criminals as they enter the supermarket they can then be refused entry. And everyone can have cheaper prices, including those struggling to stretch their budget and do the right things.
  • Farway
    Farway Posts: 13,178 Forumite
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    arnoldy said:
    Farway said:

    It already is, hence the RIFD tags on razor blades, joints of meat and maybe by now packets of Lurpack, however unless it gets to tagging every cauliflower or bar of chocolate it will not be cost-effective.

    Yes agreed, that's not cost effective. But the pareto applies here, probably 90% of theft is accounted for by a very small % of people. But if technology can identify these criminals as they enter the supermarket they can then be refused entry. And everyone can have cheaper prices, including those struggling to stretch their budget and do the right things.

    Sorry to be picky, but that technology already exists, facial recognition.
    A veritable minefield of Human rights, and would need a very determined shop with deep pockets to go down that route, probably cheaper to let people nick stuff and bung a penny or two on some items to off set the losses, much the same as now >:)
    Eight out of ten owners who expressed a preference said their cats preferred other peoples gardens
  • millie
    millie Posts: 1,442 Forumite
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     Unfortunatly the Asda app doesn't have nominated store as a "check stock availibility" so the prices will always be different. The only app I know which gives you live stock availiblity and store prices is Tesco. Hopefully all other supermarkets will start doing the same, but I doubt it as most hope you'll come into the store for a product they don't have or possibly stock in the hope you will still buy something.,
    On my Asda account I have to choose the address I want it delivered to, as I have 2 addresses on there my son uses it sometimes, so they know which store it is being picked from, that was the same store that I saw the different prices in and it does show if something is out of stock and wont let me order it if it is.
  • molerat
    molerat Posts: 31,797 Forumite
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    edited 20 July 2022 at 3:51PM
    Farway said:
    arnoldy said:
    Farway said:

    It already is, hence the RIFD tags on razor blades, joints of meat and maybe by now packets of Lurpack, however unless it gets to tagging every cauliflower or bar of chocolate it will not be cost-effective.

    Yes agreed, that's not cost effective. But the pareto applies here, probably 90% of theft is accounted for by a very small % of people. But if technology can identify these criminals as they enter the supermarket they can then be refused entry. And everyone can have cheaper prices, including those struggling to stretch their budget and do the right things.

    Sorry to be picky, but that technology already exists, facial recognition.
    A veritable minefield of Human rights, and would need a very determined shop with deep pockets to go down that route, probably cheaper to let people nick stuff and bung a penny or two on some items to off set the losses, much the same as now >:)
    It is more cost effective to cover the losses than it is to prevent it.
    Years ago I remember having a book with photos of all the known local shoplifters which was issued by the local business body.  The books were recalled on threats of being sued by a human rights organisation, no doubt having the chavs earmarked by facial recognition would be much the same.

  • pumpkin89
    pumpkin89 Posts: 637 Forumite
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    Unfortunately shoplifting is no longer a small percentage of people.  The usual caveats about surveys apply, but nevertheless pretty shocking to read that 34% of UK shoppers surveyed admitted to having stolen products at self-service checkouts in the last year.

    https://www.grocerygazette.co.uk/2022/07/15/cost-of-living-inflation-theft/
  • jon81uk
    jon81uk Posts: 3,767 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post Combo Breaker
    millie said:
    It appears that Asda have different prices on some things if they are bought instore. I went in today and noticed several things that \i buy regularly at a lower price.

    The 1.2 kilo pears are £2 online £1.60 instore, Oranges £2.40 online £2.20 instore. Tomatoes £0.70 instore £0.75 online. Did notice the tomatoes some weeks ago but thought it was probably a mistake. Did not check any other things only noticed these because I was buying the

    I know the fuel costs have risen but we still pay a delivery charge. If they need to put that charge up I would accept it but charging different prices I find sneaky. At least they should tell customers what they are doing.
    Did you actually scan those items?

    Its quite likely the wrong price was on the shelf label. Asda are awful at updating the labelling.
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