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Carbohydrates of which sugars

I know we're told to view carbohydrates on nutrition labels as a whole but I've always been curious to the "of which sugars" underneath it. Can someone explain?
Example: - A cereal box per 100g has:
Carbohydrates - 42.5g
of which sugars - 10.5g
Does the mean there's 10.5g of sugar in the cereal?
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Replies

  • Carrot007Carrot007 Forumite
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    People are obsessed with sugar, hence why it is seperately labeled.

    Ignore it. There really is no good way of explaining food in a simple box currently. (not to mention it is very individual anyway).

  • luvchocolateluvchocolate Forumite
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    Carbs turn to sugar and should be limited 
  • brook2jack2brook2jack2 Forumite
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    Yes it means there is 10.5g eg two teaspoons of sugar in 100g. One thing to be wary of is on eg cereal packets the average real life size of helping is far higher than the one quoted. 
  • silvercarsilvercar Forumite, Board Guide
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    Yes it means there is 10.5g eg two teaspoons of sugar in 100g. One thing to be wary of is on eg cereal packets the average real life size of helping is far higher than the one quoted. 
    That’s why I stick to my 2 weetabix.
    The muesli munchers in my family weighed the recommended portion size, it was enough to feed a rabbit!
    Usually found at a vaccine centre 💉
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  • unforeseenunforeseen Forumite
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    it was enough to feed a rabbit!
    Only if the rabbit was on a diet. 😂

  • coffeehoundcoffeehound Forumite
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    It's the jams that I find most misleading:  'low sugar' jams seem to have fructose syrup, corn syrup and the like instead.  Are they really any better?
  • brook2jack2brook2jack2 Forumite
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    It's the jams that I find most misleading:  'low sugar' jams seem to have fructose syrup, corn syrup and the like instead.  Are they really any better?
    No , anything ending in ose eg fructose, maltose, glucose is still basically sugar as is corn syrup. Honey, agave syrup, etc are no healthier than normal refined sugar. 
  • luvchocolateluvchocolate Forumite
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    I'm on the Diabetic UK forum as I am pre diabetic and managing with diet and exercise. 
    Really good information on there 
  • General_GrantGeneral_Grant Forumite
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    I know we're told to view carbohydrates on nutrition labels as a whole but I've always been curious to the "of which sugars" underneath it. Can someone explain?
    Example: - A cereal box per 100g has:
    Carbohydrates - 42.5g
    of which sugars - 10.5g
    Does the mean there's 10.5g of sugar in the cereal?
    It means that in each 100g of that cereal there are 10.5g of sugarS and 32g of other carbohydrates.
  • sevenhillssevenhills Forumite
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    I know we're told to view carbohydrates on nutrition labels as a whole but I've always been curious to the "of which sugars" underneath it. Can someone explain?
    Example: - A cereal box per 100g has:
    Carbohydrates - 42.5g
    of which sugars - 10.5g
    Does the mean there's 10.5g of sugar in the cereal?
    It means that in each 100g of that cereal there are 10.5g of sugarS and 32g of other carbohydrates.
    But that is only the sugar within the carbs, not the added sugar content. Something like Crunchy Nut cornflakes has 12% added sugar but has 35% of sugars within the carbs.
    Not a good breakfast food for borderline diabetics, or anyone really.


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