We'd like to remind Forumites to please avoid political debate on the Forum. This is to keep it a safe and useful space for MoneySaving discussions. Threads that are - or become - political in nature may be removed in line with the Forum’s rules. Thank you for your understanding.

What are wards like after surgery?

Options
I know this may differ from each hospital during covid era. I am due to have an operation and was wondering if wards for those recovering from surgery are any different to pre coronavirus times? I've been told I will go to a 'clean ward'. Is this any 'cleaner' than before covid era? I was thinking of having a private room but am wondering if a 'clean ward' would be safer. Any information and/or personal experience is greatly appreciated. Thank you.
«13

Comments

  • Floss
    Floss Posts: 8,373 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    Options
    I would hazard a guess that 'clean' means no Covid. It likely will be technically cleaner than previous as cleaning regimes have been increased.

    Have your hospital confirmed that your op will be going ahead? I'm sure there will be info on their website if you're concerned.
    2021 Decluttering Awards: ⭐⭐🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇 2022 Decluttering Awards: 🥇
    2023 Decluttering Awards: 🥇 🏅🏅🥇
    2024 Decluttering Awards: 🥇
  • leapyear
    Options
    Floss said:
    I would hazard a guess that 'clean' means no Covid. It likely will be technically cleaner than previous as cleaning regimes have been increased.

    Have your hospital confirmed that your op will be going ahead? I'm sure there will be info on their website if you're concerned.
    I agree that regimes have been increased.  I would prefer not to have to share a toilet/bathroom but I assume a 'clean ward' would be 'cleaner' than a private room. 
    I have a pre assessment and because of that I thought my op could be any day from then on. My hospital website doesn't say if they are or aren't going ahead with operations. Hopefully will find out at my pre assessment. I live with shielders who have yet to have their vaccination, and I am afraid their protection will not have kicked in by time I have my operation and I bring covid home with me.
  • Teapot55
    Teapot55 Posts: 740 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Photogenic Name Dropper
    Options
    Where I live you have to stick to social distancing etc for two weeks and go out as little as possible, then three days before admission you take a covid test at the hospital then go straight home and self isolate till you go in.

    On the day you report straight to theatre admissions (or similar) and after surgery and some time in ‘recovery’ you go to a ‘green’ ward where all the other patients have followed the same regime. You then stay in hospital for the absolute minimum time. 

    All staff wear masks at all times and other patients’ beds are a sufficient distance away. Doctors rounds to post-operative patients are done early in the day before the doctors have been anywhere else. 

    When relatives etc come to collect you upon discharge they have to wait outside and the porter pushes you to meet them and then follows them and takes you right to the car and makes sure to place your bag of ‘meds’ on your lap where it won’t be mislaid. 

    would've . . . could've . . . should've . . .


    A.A.A.S. (Associate of the Acronym Abolition Society)

    There's definitely no 'a' in 'definitely'.
  • sheramber
    sheramber Posts: 19,477 Forumite
    First Anniversary I've been Money Tipped! First Post Name Dropper
    Options
    Staying in  a hotel because you are isolating is allowed. If you are concerned, you could do that for 10 ays when you come out of hospitsl.
  • elsien
    elsien Posts: 33,193 Forumite
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Anniversary First Post
    edited 10 February 2021 at 5:27PM
    Options
    There are still no guarantees though, however hard staff try to maintain infection control. People are still going into hospital on wards that are covid free at the time, then finding out they have been in contact with someone who has tested positive, or they subsequently have a positive test themselves. 
    Is there a way to maintain distance between you and the people you live with when you get home - stay in your room as far as possible, etc? 
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • Floss
    Floss Posts: 8,373 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    Options
    You should also be given a Covid test before your admission date.
    2021 Decluttering Awards: ⭐⭐🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇 2022 Decluttering Awards: 🥇
    2023 Decluttering Awards: 🥇 🏅🏅🥇
    2024 Decluttering Awards: 🥇
  • leapyear
    Options
    Teapot55 said:
    Where I live you have to stick to social distancing etc for two weeks and go out as little as possible, then three days before admission you take a covid test at the hospital then go straight home and self isolate till you go in.

    On the day you report straight to theatre admissions (or similar) and after surgery and some time in ‘recovery’ you go to a ‘green’ ward where all the other patients have followed the same regime. You then stay in hospital for the absolute minimum time. 

    All staff wear masks at all times and other patients’ beds are a sufficient distance away. Doctors rounds to post-operative patients are done early in the day before the doctors have been anywhere else. 

    When relatives etc come to collect you upon discharge they have to wait outside and the porter pushes you to meet them and then follows them and takes you right to the car and makes sure to place your bag of ‘meds’ on your lap where it won’t be mislaid. 
    Thank you for the detailed info. I feel more aware and calmer about what to expect. I think I am most concerned about the shared bathroom. My concern about a private room is it won't be as covid secure as the ward - are hospitals in a good enough position to give a private room that is also 'green' and 'clean' as the ward? My family is concerned that if I have a private room, there'll be no one (other patients) to see me if something goes wrong and can call a nurse to help me.
  • leapyear
    Options
    sheramber said:
    Staying in  a hotel because you are isolating is allowed. If you are concerned, you could do that for 10 ays when you come out of hospitsl.
    I would if I could. But I've been told when I come home, after surgery, I will need physical help to move and will need someone with me.
  • leapyear
    Options
    elsien said:
    Is there a way to maintain distance between you and the people you live with when you get home - stay in your room as far as possible, etc? 
    I don't think I can. :( I've been told I will need their help to go to the toilet, get up out of bed etc.
  • Teapot55
    Teapot55 Posts: 740 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Photogenic Name Dropper
    Options
    leapyear said:
    Teapot55 said:
    Where I live you have to stick to social distancing etc for two weeks and go out as little as possible, then three days before admission you take a covid test at the hospital then go straight home and self isolate till you go in.

    On the day you report straight to theatre admissions (or similar) and after surgery and some time in ‘recovery’ you go to a ‘green’ ward where all the other patients have followed the same regime. You then stay in hospital for the absolute minimum time. 

    All staff wear masks at all times and other patients’ beds are a sufficient distance away. Doctors rounds to post-operative patients are done early in the day before the doctors have been anywhere else. 

    When relatives etc come to collect you upon discharge they have to wait outside and the porter pushes you to meet them and then follows them and takes you right to the car and makes sure to place your bag of ‘meds’ on your lap where it won’t be mislaid. 
    Thank you for the detailed info. I feel more aware and calmer about what to expect. I think I am most concerned about the shared bathroom. My concern about a private room is it won't be as covid secure as the ward - are hospitals in a good enough position to give a private room that is also 'green' and 'clean' as the ward? My family is concerned that if I have a private room, there'll be no one (other patients) to see me if something goes wrong and can call a nurse to help me.
    A patient often has a catheter at first, or maybe uses a bedpan. The bathrooms have washing facilities including soap and soft paper towels and alcohol-type handwash. I guess you could ask about this in advance to double check. 

    would've . . . could've . . . should've . . .


    A.A.A.S. (Associate of the Acronym Abolition Society)

    There's definitely no 'a' in 'definitely'.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 12 Election 2024: The MSE Leaders' Debate
  • 344.2K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.4K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450.1K Spending & Discounts
  • 236.3K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 609.7K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.6K Life & Family
  • 248.9K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards