Cosmetic dentistry - advice please

edited 28 December 2020 at 6:22PM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
7 replies 211 views
Lupus_LouLupus_Lou Forumite
110 Posts
100 Posts Second Anniversary Photogenic
edited 28 December 2020 at 6:22PM in Health & Beauty MoneySaving
Hi,
In January 2020 I decided it was time to sort my teeth out.
As a child I had numerous prescription for oxytetracycline, in my 20s and 30s I smoked and drank red wine, consequently my teeth were heavily stained.
In 1998 I had extensive work involving crowns and veneers costing around £11k
By 2020 these were kn&ckered  and I needed a complete overhaul of my teeth.
I went to a local dentist, had numerous x rays, measurements and eventually a 3D model was made of my jaw which cost me £950. I got a quote for £17k for a complete overhaul which was fine and seemed reasonable. 
We were just about to start then we went into lockdown.
My dentist has now moved on and I want to start looking for another dentist.
Do the model and x rays belong to me? Can I just ask for them back? 
I would be grateful for any advice?
57 Ex Registered Nurse currently working in local govt and hoping for redundancy so I can return to nursing.
Large dental bill due in September 2021 so need to get my accounts into shape

Replies

  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
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    The dentist you go with is entitled to ask for previous files and records you've had taken. There count be a nominal cost for passing on the files, but it shouldn't be much if they are electronic. With it being almost a year since the last lot were taken, a new dentist could easily want up-to-date ones though. Not sure about the 3D model, that will depend on the reason it was deemed necessary. 
    The old practice might be happier passing records on to the new named dentist than they would just giving them to you to do what you choose with. 
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • Lupus_LouLupus_Lou Forumite
    110 Posts
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    Thank you very much.
    I realised after this that my dentist has moved to a different practice in Hemel but within the same group.
    I therefore assume if I go to him at his new practice we might be able to pick up where we left off.
    Jo 
    57 Ex Registered Nurse currently working in local govt and hoping for redundancy so I can return to nursing.
    Large dental bill due in September 2021 so need to get my accounts into shape
  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
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    That would sound sensible
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • UndervaluedUndervalued Forumite
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    The dentist you go with is entitled to ask for previous files and records you've had taken. There count be a nominal cost for passing on the files, but it shouldn't be much if they are electronic. With it being almost a year since the last lot were taken, a new dentist could easily want up-to-date ones though. Not sure about the 3D model, that will depend on the reason it was deemed necessary. 
    The old practice might be happier passing records on to the new named dentist than they would just giving them to you to do what you choose with. 
    But surely they are legally obliged to give copies of the records to the patient if they are requested under the GDPR. How does "happier" come into it?
  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
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    That is indeed true. However, from the dentist point of view, if those records were then the basis of treatment planning for a patient who had decided to go on a jolly to some clinic abroad, something had gone wrong or failed, and the patient had then discovered the difficulties of taking action against a clinic in a different country, it would be the soft target of the UK dentist who supplied the x-rays that could then be the focus of the ambulance chasers. 

    I would always be happier supplying records & radiographs to the next dentist rather than just giving them to the patient. Patients are generally reasonable and can see the sense in them being passed directly too. It also opens up a line of communication between old & new dentist, and gives the new dentist a direct link if there is something about an x-ray or a treatment plan they need to question. It generally makes for a smoother transfer, which is also in the patient's best interest.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • UndervaluedUndervalued Forumite
    6.7K Posts
    Eighth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    That is indeed true. However, from the dentist point of view, if those records were then the basis of treatment planning for a patient who had decided to go on a jolly to some clinic abroad, something had gone wrong or failed, and the patient had then discovered the difficulties of taking action against a clinic in a different country, it would be the soft target of the UK dentist who supplied the x-rays that could then be the focus of the ambulance chasers. 

    I would always be happier supplying records & radiographs to the next dentist rather than just giving them to the patient. Patients are generally reasonable and can see the sense in them being passed directly too. It also opens up a line of communication between old & new dentist, and gives the new dentist a direct link if there is something about an x-ray or a treatment plan they need to question. It generally makes for a smoother transfer, which is also in the patient's best interest.
    I can fully understand all that but it doesn't change the legal position. Potential "ambulance chasers" or not, the patient is entitle to a copy of their records and can then give then to who they please.
  • ToothsmithToothsmith Forumite
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    I didn't say they weren't. But the process is likely to be smoother going from one dentist directly to the new one.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
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