New Post Advanced Search

Challenge Council tax Band

9 replies 61 views
I bought a two-bedroom end of terrace house in November for £259k. I'm a single occupant. The full rate is about £1650, with my SPD is about £1300pa, so about £108 a month. The one I'm attached to struggled to sell, and they dropped it to £242k. We are both on Band C. 

I am next to a three-bedroom detached house with sold for £350k and has a family in it. This is also on Band C. Does this sound right? I know it's not done on people living there (which I think is unfair), but proportionally I am paying far more per head in the households and using much less by way of services, yet on the same band. I don't see how properties with £110k difference can be on the same Band. Is it worth me challenging and how do I go about it?

Replies

  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I agree with you, Band C doesn't sound right for a 3 bed detached, probably should be a Band D.
  • 20SmthngSver20SmthngSver Forumite
    507 posts
    100 Posts Name Dropper First Anniversary
    ✭✭
    I agree with you, Band C doesn't sound right for a 3 bed detached, probably should be a Band D.
    Well, the semi-deatched 3 bed 3 level without a garage & the detached 3 bed 2 level with external garage are band C, but the 3 bed 2 level with internal garage is band D, and there's only 3 of them (I think these were about £380k). There are 4, 4 bed 3 level houses, and they are E. 

    I don't think it's fair that the 2 beds are banded the same as most of the 3 beds, as they are smaller in sq footage and plot size.
  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Given the limits of Band C (£52,001 - £68,000 at 1991 values) there will be many different house types in the band and quite common for 2 and 3 beds to be in the same band, I came across plenty when I was in the VOA. You are still in time to appeal the band if you want to.
  • 20SmthngSver20SmthngSver Forumite
    507 posts
    100 Posts Name Dropper First Anniversary
    ✭✭
    Given the limits of Band C (£52,001 - £68,000 at 1991 values) there will be many different house types in the band and quite common for 2 and 3 beds to be in the same band, I came across plenty when I was in the VOA. You are still in time to appeal the band if you want to.
    Okay, thanks. How do you appeal though? And what is the time limit? There are three houses called a '1 plus study' - identical to my two bed, except the front bedroom is bigger, bathroom is further back, and the back bedroom is legally too small to be called a bedroom, and that is Band C too. It doesn't seem fair to me that 1 and 2 bedroom houses with less people are banded the same as a 3 bed, yet there are two types of 3 bed which are on either C or D.
  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I have already explained that it is possible and correct that 2 beds can be banded the same as 3 beds and there are hundreds of thousands of examples of this.

    If a 2 bed house would have sold for £52,500 on 1 April 1991 and a 3 bed house would have sold for £67,500 on the same date then both would be correctly in Band C. You may not think that is "fair" but that is how the system works and trying to argue your case on this basis will not get you very far. The number of people living in a house has no affect on its band. There is no such thing as a "legal size" for a bedroom. 

    You have 6 months from the date you first occupied your home in which to appeal. "Occupied" has a wider meaning than just physically occupying, it also means the date on which you were first entitled to occupy your home, i.e. the date you bought your home ("completion date") or the date from which your tenancy commenced (if you were renting). Also if the VOA served a Notice of Alteration of Valuation List after your completion you have 6 months from the date of the notice to appeal.

    Go to the VOA website and follow the instructions for "appealing your CT band"

  • 20SmthngSver20SmthngSver Forumite
    507 posts
    100 Posts Name Dropper First Anniversary
    ✭✭
    I have already explained that it is possible and correct that 2 beds can be banded the same as 3 beds and there are hundreds of thousands of examples of this.

    If a 2 bed house would have sold for £52,500 on 1 April 1991 and a 3 bed house would have sold for £67,500 on the same date then both would be correctly in Band C. You may not think that is "fair" but that is how the system works and trying to argue your case on this basis will not get you very far. The number of people living in a house has no affect on its band. There is no such thing as a "legal size" for a bedroom. 

    You have 6 months from the date you first occupied your home in which to appeal. "Occupied" has a wider meaning than just physically occupying, it also means the date on which you were first entitled to occupy your home, i.e. the date you bought your home ("completion date") or the date from which your tenancy commenced (if you were renting). Also if the VOA served a Notice of Alteration of Valuation List after your completion you have 6 months from the date of the notice to appeal.

    Go to the VOA website and follow the instructions for "appealing your CT band"

    Okay, thanks for your help. I know it's not based on how many people lived here, I was just saying as an example of being banded the same but proportionally paying more per head in the household.

    Actually there is such a thing as a 'legally sized bedroom,' as building companies can't market a house as a two or three bedroom for example if one of the bedrooms is too small to have a bed in it. That is why the development I bought had '1 plus study' (same sq footage as the 2 bed, just a bigger front bedroom and smaller back bedroom) and '2 plus study' (same house as the 3 bedroom, again just altered size of third bedroom and repositioned bathroom). They were legally challenged on it for selling them at the same prices despite being marketing as having one less bedroom each. 
  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    There is no "legal size" for a bedroom as no such legislation exists. There is legislation or guidance on total size of habitable accommodation for rental purposes in that 1 person needs "x" sq m. 2 people need "y" sq m etc. Clearly if a room is too small to accommodate a standard size single bed, it should not be advertised or claimed to be a bedroom.

    I cannot see how there can be a "legal challenge" for selling different houses at the same price. There is no legislation that dictates the price at which builders/developers should sell. It would be perfectly in order for a builder to sell a smaller 3 bed house at a higher price than a larger 4 bed. It would be stupid and they should not make any false or misleading statements about either house, but it is not illegal.
  • 20SmthngSver20SmthngSver Forumite
    507 posts
    100 Posts Name Dropper First Anniversary
    ✭✭
    There is no "legal size" for a bedroom as no such legislation exists. There is legislation or guidance on total size of habitable accommodation for rental purposes in that 1 person needs "x" sq m. 2 people need "y" sq m etc. Clearly if a room is too small to accommodate a standard size single bed, it should not be advertised or claimed to be a bedroom.

    I cannot see how there can be a "legal challenge" for selling different houses at the same price. There is no legislation that dictates the price at which builders/developers should sell. It would be perfectly in order for a builder to sell a smaller 3 bed house at a higher price than a larger 4 bed. It would be stupid and they should not make any false or misleading statements about either house, but it is not illegal.

    I don't see the benefit or logic in you saying that a 3 bed should be sold for more than a 4 bed. Not sure I've ever seen that.
    Re: being challenged, I only what the marketing suite said, and they were challenged by the housing regulators over selling the same house with different third bedroom sizes at the same price, which is why they then had to market as either a two plus study or a 3 bed, depending on whether the third room could fit a bed. 
  • lincroft1710lincroft1710 Forumite
    14K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I never said there was a benefit in selling a 3 bed for more than a 4 bed, I simply said it was not illegal to do so.

    I don't know what the marketing suite were actually saying, but it does not make sense. There are no "housing regulators" who have the power to dictate prices, unless this was some form of affordable housing scheme where the builders/developers had an agreement with the local Planning Authority that in return for planning permission being granted, certain house types would have a cap on the maximum price at which they could be sold.

    If the above was the case then it is possible prices for such houses  would not be considered "open market value" and thus could not be used as evidence for arriving at the CT band.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support