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Not exactly money saving - but ...

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Not exactly money saving - but ...

edited 26 January at 5:24AM in I wanna buy-it or do-it
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Retired_SaverRetired_Saver
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edited 26 January at 5:24AM in I wanna buy-it or do-it
This is not exactly money saving - but I am trying not to buy a book on English grammar.

It is about English grammar and a young relative has floored me by asking (thinking I'd be sure to know!) and now I really am confused - so many search results seem to be U.S. English rather than U.K.English.

Should we say (in an essay for example) that: "*The the policy is different from the practiCe - as in practice as a noun - or should it be the policy is different from the practiSe - as in a verb? In some places the work policy is good but the staff practice is different, really questionable and not good. We went on to discuss what was described as formal and informal structures in business ? or formal and informal practices/practises/policies. Daft, I know, but it's driving me a bit round the bend and is beyond me!

We could get our heads round, for example: "We understand the way the staff practise new techniques in the GP Practice." ..... but then I searched for other examples and got lost.

If anyone knows or can say as above* - should it be 'The policy is different from the practice or the policy is different from the practise?' - thank you very much. Although it is boggling my mind, it is good that a youngster wants to get the grammar right for the essay. Spellcheck does not seem to pick it up in my ancient copy of Microsoft Word - U.K. English.

Thank you very much.

Retired Saver

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  • sarah1972sarah1972
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    This is not exactly money saving - but I am trying not to buy a book on English grammar.

    It is about English grammar and a young relative has floored me by asking (thinking I'd be sure to know!) and now I really am confused - so many search results seem to be U.S. English rather than U.K.English.

    Should we say (in an essay for example) that: "*The the policy is different from the practiCe - as in practice as a noun - or should it be the policy is different from the practiSe - as in a verb? In some places the work policy is good but the staff practice is different, really questionable and not good. We went on to discuss what was described as formal and informal structures in business ? or formal and informal practices/practises/policies. Daft, I know, but it's driving me a bit round the bend and is beyond me!

    We could get our heads round, for example: "We understand the way the staff practise new techniques in the GP Practice." ..... but then I searched for other examples and got lost.

    If anyone knows or can say as above* - should it be 'The policy is different from the practice or the policy is different from the practise?' - thank you very much. Although it is boggling my mind, it is good that a youngster wants to get the grammar right for the essay. Spellcheck does not seem to pick it up in my ancient copy of Microsoft Word - U.K. English.

    Thank you very much.

    Retired Saver

    Lots of results on google, most common one is:

    The word is always spelled practice in American English. In British English, the noun form is also spelled practice. The word is spelled practise when used as a verb in British English
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