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Martin Lewis, Citizens Advice and Facebook launch major initiatives to fight scam ads - MSE News

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Martin Lewis, Citizens Advice and Facebook launch major initiatives to fight scam ads - MSE News

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MSE_CallumMSE_Callum Forumite
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Two major initiatives to combat online scam adverts have launched today as a direct result of a campaigning defamation lawsuit by Martin Lewis...
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'Martin Lewis, Citizens Advice and Facebook launch major initiatives to fight scam ads'
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  • GypsyRoseGypsyRose Forumite
    11 posts
    Fourth Anniversary
    MoneySaving Newbie
    I don’t understand why the ads are not screened before being accepted. Just last week they were still using your photo Martin! Facebook basically taking the !!!! I think £3m is nothing to them obviously. Hope this new initiative helps stop this exploitation.
  • Paul_DNAPPaul_DNAP Forumite
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    Exactly as Rose said above - it's barely a victory to force them to say "if you think we are lying to you, let us know and we might do something about it" - the only way to really solve this is for them to take responsibility for vetting who they sell advertising space to and vetting what they use that advertising space for AHEAD of them publishing pure lies.


    And they'll only take down the adverts reported? No promises to ban certain customers from the site for repeated offences? No, because if their money is good facebook doesn't care one jot, they've only capitulated this far to get a couple of favourable headlines out of you whilst laughing behind your back with a suitcase of dirty cash.
    (Although I could be wrong, I often am.)
  • TakmonTakmon Forumite
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    It's quite worrying that some people see a picture of Martin Lewis and then believe 100% he is endorsing it without doing any other evidence.

    The only real solution is for people to stop being so gullible when it comes to adverts. I thought it was common sense that you shouldn't just believe everything you are being told when you are being sold something, which that is the primary purpose of adverts.

    If someone is going to see an avert on Facebook and then hand over £50k because the guy on the phone is friendly then they shouldn't be in charge of their own finances.
  • AvarusAvarus Forumite
    2 posts
    Is there somewhere we can report sites using Martin Lewis' name and photo to promote stuff?
    I've just found 2 :mad:
  • accorianaccorian Forumite
    93 posts
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    Seriously unimpressive way of dealing with the slime out there: reporting should be a 2 minute online task, whereas having confronted the thousands of words comprising the Citizens' Advice Bureau 'alert' facility, I've almost lost the will to live.

    All you need is a box in which to insert the url of the scam site and then further boxes within which to enter your own details (if you so wish). Instead, CAB is all about pointless verbiage, on and on and on.

    Reporting of scam sites needs to be as fast as the speed at which they're being put together, because only that way will the slime behind them be discouraged.

    Currently, online scammeres are finding it necessary to invest more and more time and money into increasingly complex scam sites because of the way their original efforts have been so extensively undermined by hostile publicity. No longer can a single pretence be sustained: the attempted fraud has to be complex in order to be persuasive.

    Latest scam (time consuming though it must have been to put it together) is a fake copy of a genuine newspaper website, with an entirely fake "news report" on that website about some celeb or other whose name may resonate favourably with he dumb or the gullible out there (of whom there seem to be hundreds of thousands.) If, as in this case, the report can be presented as a report-of-a-report-from-somewhere-else, so much the better.

    An come-on ad on The Spectator's home page links to this triple layer scam involving, without their knowledge or their consent, the Daily Mirror, ITV's 'This Morning', and so-called 'celebrity chef' Gordon Ramsay.

    The scammers have failed to obfuscate their url so the 'Mirror' page opens on https://better-news.live/lps/UKmirrRam/?sxid=8guwf441i4jo (note: obviously, this url is criminally fraudulent and mentioned here only as an example of the lengths to which scammers are now going in their attempts to appear credible).

    Moving in quickly on the slime behind better-news live is obviously the way to go but as long as what passes for consumer protection in the UK rests largely in the blundering amateurish hands of the CAB, then there's not much hope there. :(
  • fatbellyfatbelly Forumite
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    accorian wrote: »
    Seriously unimpressive way of dealing with the slime out there: reporting should be a 2 minute online task, whereas having confronted the thousands of words comprising the Citizens' Advice Bureau 'alert' facility, I've almost lost the will to live.

    Moving in quickly on the slime behind better-news live is obviously the way to go but as long as what passes for consumer protection in the UK rests largely in the blundering amateurish hands of the CAB, then there's not much hope there. :(

    Completely agree. This is pathetically inept.
    Call our helpline

    Contact a Scams Action adviser by calling 0300 330 3003.

    The service is open from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm. We're closed on bank holidays.

    We don’t charge for calls to the helpline. Your service provider could charge you for your call, but it should be free if either:
    •your contract includes all calls to landlines
    •you’re within your free minutes allowance for calls to landlines

    You might be charged if your contract doesn’t include all calls to landlines or you’ve used all your free minutes. For example, a 10 minute call could cost:
    •£1.73 from a BT landline - find out more about BT call charges
    •£3.50 if you’re an EE pay as you go customer - find out more about EE call charges

    Check your supplier’s website to find out what you’ll be charged.
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