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Money Moral Dilemma: Should I tell my employer it has overpaid me?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Employment, Jobseeking & Training
54 replies 38.7K views
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  • Of course you should tell them - why haven't you done so immediately?

    You do realise by not telling them, you probably now won't get promotion because you'll be seen as untrustworthy?

    I cannot believe you are even asking this question.

    What a dishonest person you are. Shame on you.
  • antonicantonic Forumite
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    In the Civil Service its a disciplinary offence NOT to notify HR is you spot a mistake on your monthly payslip , such as in this case.
    The onus is on YOU as the jobholder to make them aware you cant get away with blaming HR.
    (Or you could if you want to be dismissed !).
  • Autumn86Autumn86 Forumite
    275 posts
    Wow this forum literally is just packed full of timid wimpy wussy goody-goody neeks and nerds!! :rotfl::rotfl:

    In reality ofcourse any/every normal person wouldn't say anything! :T

    It's not your job to 'pay yourself' what you think your monthly salary is meant to be,
    Nor do you have any legal responsibility to actually even check your bank balance each month to see how much you got paid exactly.

    If the employer overpays you that's their loss.
    You simply need to ''not notice ", and subsequently not rock the boat. ;)


    I have previously been overpaid by nearly £4,600 total (split between 2-occassions at 2 different employers), where I booked annual-leave days that I wasn't entitled to (or rather wouldn't be unless I actually worked the required number of shifts that year to qualify in retrospect).

    It was simple tbh, as both very huge companies so mass admin, thus minimal attention to details by them;
    And whilst I had full-time permenant employment contracts with both companies, ultimately my shifts were assigned by the site which I was working at, not by the corporate head-office company itself....
    So all I did was simply work a few weeks at a site (over the course of 2-3 months), take 14-days in a row of annual-leave, got paid those 14-days at the end of that month; But I then simply declined to opt-in for future shifts at that site, and thus basically just being forgotten about by them, but yet still showing on the head-company's book as being a permenant employee of theirs (since I hadn't ever resigned). :D:beer:


    At the time that setup suited me fine as I already had a solid regular monthly income from benefits, a weekend cash-in-hand job, and student finance loan + grant money | So was a excellent opportunity and gift of a few thousand in free cash. :T
  • Kentish_DaveKentish_Dave
    842 posts
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    Autumn, I know that you are only here to wind people up, but do you not think that being the sort of person who does this and your dishonesty is why you are not doing so well in life?

    Your written English while not great is decent enough, suggesting that you did at least pay attention in school, and have some ability to learn so you need to ask yourself what else brought you here, glorying in trying to make other people unhappy.

    You don’t earn much money, you are not in a good job, and you get your fun by being unpleasant. What would your mother think if she saw this? Do you genuinely think that when you grow up you’ll feel pleased that you did it?

    I do feel sorry for you, but this is no way for any decent person to act.
  • Autumn86Autumn86 Forumite
    275 posts
    Actually all of what I did was perfectly legitimate and legal. :money:

    As I was perfectly entitled to book annual-leave, and I was perfectly entitled to choose if I opt-in for working for a specific employer or not.


    If they had chosen to contact me and requested any money back, I would of reviewed their request and then refunded them any money which they were legally entitled to...
    But if they didn't contact me to submit any such request, well that's their responsibility for failing to check their payroll setup properly (or maybe they were aware but felt I deserved the money). :o
  • Autumn86Autumn86 Forumite
    275 posts
    antonic wrote: »
    In the Civil Service its a disciplinary offence NOT to notify HR is you spot a mistake on your monthly payslip , such as in this case.
    The onus is on YOU as the jobholder to make them aware you cant get away with blaming HR.
    (Or you could if you want to be dismissed !).


    You have no obligation to check your payslip if you choose not to,
    as it's the employer's job to operate payroll, and pay you the sum of money which they choose to each month.

    You have no duty whatsoever to proof-read & check their sums for them, nor any obligation to look at your payslip if you choose not to. ;)


    So they couldn't ''blame you for not noticing a mistake they made".
  • Not exactly a dilemma, is it!
    I'm broke, not poor. Poor sounds permanent, broke can be fixed. (Thoroughly Modern Millie)
    LBM June 2009, Debt Free (except mortgage) Sept 2016 - DONE IT!
  • ExodiExodi Forumite
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    Autumn86 wrote: »
    You have no obligation to check your payslip if you choose not to,
    as it's the employer's job to operate payroll, and pay you the sum of money which they choose to each month.

    You have no duty whatsoever to proof-read & check their sums for them, nor any obligation to look at your payslip if you choose not to. ;)


    So they couldn't ''blame you for not noticing a mistake they made".

    So by extension you'd take no issue with being underpaid and wouldn't expect reimbursement?
    Know what you don't
  • Yep789Yep789 Forumite
    1 posts
    If you know that you have been paid incorrectly but fail to declare it you will end up having to pay it back possibly in installments for ages if you can agree a repayment plan. Your other dilemma is your employer will think that you are dishonest and not to be trusted which could lead to no further opportunities being offered to you.
  • Autumn86Autumn86 Forumite
    275 posts
    Exodi wrote: »
    So by extension you'd take no issue with being underpaid and wouldn't expect reimbursement?


    It is upto me if I choose to look at my payslip, in the privacy of my own home, or not | Thus something which can never be proven...

    But so it'd always just happen to be a lucky coincidence that I did notice any underpayments, but didn't notice any overpayments. :D;)


    *In my job my actual takehome pay varies each month though (depending on how many of my shifts were on a Saturday, Sunday, or Night | As all those shifts are pair with an enhancement rate ontop of my pay-band base salary),
    So for all I know I could be getting underpaid/ or overpaid by £100+ per month.
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