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The War against plastic waste

edited 18 June 2019 at 9:51AM in Old Style MoneySaving
392 replies 55.4K views
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  • edited 2 June 2019 at 10:42PM
    greenbeegreenbee Forumite
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    edited 2 June 2019 at 10:42PM
    If you can provide a link to the source data i’d be interested in reading the evidence so I could make an informed decision, as according to WWF 80% of ocean plastic comes from land.

    https://www.wwf.org.uk/updates/how-does-plastic-end-ocean
  • K80_BlackK80_Black Forumite
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    My mistake. The article(s) I was thinking of referred only to the great Pacific garbage patch and not the entire ocean. I actually saw it written in the sea life centre most recently, but recalled multiple articles last year about it. Here's one from the national geographic.

    https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/great-pacific-garbage-patch-plastics-environment/

    Its still a huge proportion of plastic waste.
  • Fire_FoxFire_Fox Forumite
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    K80_Black wrote: »
    If you're worried about the environment, it doesn't really matter HOW you get your milk - the fact that you're drinking it at all is the issue. Cows produce a lot of polluting gases like methane. If you switched to a non dairy alternative you'd be making a much bigger impact than anything mentioned thus far.

    I am not clear how processed alternatives are any better for the environment. What happens to the rest of the plant matter after the 'milk' is extracted?
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
  • K80_BlackK80_Black Forumite
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    Fire_Fox wrote: »
    I am not clear how processed alternatives are any better for the environment. What happens to the rest of the plant matter after the 'milk' is extracted?

    Here's the statistics on the environmental impact of various milks from the BBC.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46654042

    As you can see from the graph, even the 'worst' nom dairy milk uses less water and land, and they all have significantly less emitions.

    Any leftovers from the production of non dairy milk will decompose very easily.

    What happens to all the cows past their milking age?
  • THIRZAHTHIRZAH Forumite
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    I was buying a sandwich to eat on the train and wanted some crisps too. It was cheaper to buy the "Meal Deal " which included a drink -in a plastic bottle of course!. I didn't really need the drink as I had filled my water bottle in the hotel.Perhaps retailers could be persuaded to change their "Meal Deals" to include something like an apple instead of a drink.


    In case anyone wonders why I didn't take a sandwich from home , I had done so on my way down. The sandwich from the supermarket was for my return journey two days later.
  • tori.ktori.k Forumite
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    K80_Black wrote: »
    Here's the statistics on the environmental impact of various milks from the BBC.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46654042

    As you can see from the graph, even the 'worst' nom dairy milk uses less water and land, and they all have significantly less emitions.

    Any leftovers from the production of non dairy milk will decompose very easily.

    What happens to all the cows past their milking age?

    Didn't go unnoticed that they didn't publish the Vegan milks by location as they did the dairy.
    Moving tonnage of things across the world like almonds is carbon heavy and hardly sustainable.

    We over complicate things there is no best way just best practice, sustainable livestock production is possible if done in permaculture system not the current monoculture farming that detrimental regardless if that's livestock or plant based. its overall consumption that has to be addressed.

    Old milk cows are sent to slaughter, low grade meat for ready made burgers and the like & pet food hides to the leather industry blood and bones to a processing plant for domestic and monoculture farming for fertilizer their is actually little waste, waste is not cost effective.
  • tori.ktori.k Forumite
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    Back on topic
    I think all we can do is be honest with ourselves if we actually need an item regardless if its plastic or not.
    I foolishly gave myself a pat on the back as years ago I replaced my washing up bowl with a stainless steel when our plastic one was melted by a hot pan this bowl was/is going to last me my lifetime, im such a twit the sensible person in me now asks why did I replace it all I have a plug for the sink and various buckets for other jobs, the carbon and resources used to make my steel washing up bowl negates any positive environmental or financial gain.
  • K80_BlackK80_Black Forumite
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    tori.k wrote: »
    Didn't go unnoticed that they didn't publish the Vegan milks by location as they did the dairy.
    Moving tonnage of things across the world like almonds is carbon heavy and hardly sustainable.

    We over complicate things there is no best way just best practice, sustainable livestock production is possible if done in permaculture system not the current monoculture farming that detrimental regardless if that's livestock or plant based. its overall consumption that has to be addressed.

    Old milk cows are sent to slaughter, low grade meat for ready made burgers and the like & pet food hides to the leather industry blood and bones to a processing plant for domestic and monoculture farming for fertilizer their is actually little waste, waste is not cost effective.

    The dairy milks and non dairy milks were shown as an average worldwide. They don't need to break down every non dairy milk as they did for dairy - the main graph shows they are all less harmful than dairy, even when transportation is included, as it was in the first graph.

    Thanks for pointing out that 5 year old cows (they live to 25 naturally) are killed. After a short life of constant pregnancy and having their calfs taken away (I've met grown adults who think cows are somehow different from humans and don't need pregnancy to lactate), their final thank you for proving your milk is an early death. I didn't want to bring animal cruelty into this, but there you go.
  • Fire_FoxFire_Fox Forumite
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    K80_Black wrote: »
    Here's the statistics on the environmental impact of various milks from the BBC.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46654042

    As you can see from the graph, even the 'worst' nom dairy milk uses less water and land, and they all have significantly less emitions.

    Any leftovers from the production of non dairy milk will decompose very easily.

    Thank you, interesting. Surprising to see the stark difference between cheese and beef.

    Leftovers 'decomposing' implies food waste.
    K80_Black wrote: »
    What happens to all the cows past their milking age?

    I do not personally drink milk, but do consume a variety of traditional dairy products (European origin). The ewes/ goats/ cows eventually enter the food chain. AFAIK the meat of ewes and goats is more likely to eventually be consumed by humans than intensively farmed dairy cows.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
  • tori.ktori.k Forumite
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    K80_Black wrote: »
    The dairy milks and non dairy milks were shown as an average worldwide. They don't need to break down every non dairy milk as they did for dairy - the main graph shows they are all less harmful than dairy, even when transportation is included, as it was in the first graph.

    Thanks for pointing out that 5 year old cows (they live to 25 naturally) are killed. After a short life of constant pregnancy and having their calfs taken away (I've met grown adults who think cows are somehow different from humans and don't need pregnancy to lactate), their final thank you for proving your milk is an early death. I didn't want to bring animal cruelty into this, but there you go.

    I don't actually drink milk or eat eggs. husband & I are vegetarian our children eat meat, as is our individual choice.
    If im going to choose a soap box ( and I often bang that drum) its going to be for food miles in the form of local products regardless of meat or plant based. as I see that as a positive sustainable option.
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