tzatziki herb mixes

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dlusmandlusman Forumite
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Does anyone know if any supermarket sells dry herb mixes for make your own tzatziki . or am I going to have to order online / make my own ?

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  • spadooshspadoosh Forumite
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    You make it sound like such a chore.

    Grate a cucumber, put the contents in greek yoghurt = poor mans tzatziki.

    Chuck in a few garli cloves, olive oil, lemon and mint and you have the real deal.

    It sounds like youve put more effort in to getting an off the shelf version already.

    Or are you on about gyros mixes?
  • edited 30 August 2018 at 5:01PM
    dlusmandlusman Forumite
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    edited 30 August 2018 at 5:01PM
    Looking for something like https://www.amazon.co.uk/Greek-Spices-Mix-Tzatziki-50gr/dp/B06XFHGBVS


    For the small quantities I want to make at a time, it would be far easier to use a small amount of mix , rather than always making totally from fresh
  • Callie22Callie22 Forumite
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    If you want to replicate the mix then buy some dried garlic granules and some dried dill, that's all that's in that mix (along with salt). You'd be able to buy a pot of each for about £1 each from any supermarket and they'd last just as long as the mix. I'd guess from looking at the mix it's about half-and-half of the garlic and dill, but if you bought them separately then you'd be able to mix it to how you prefer it. I have to say though that dried garlic tends not to taste that great ...
  • elsienelsien Forumite
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    spadoosh wrote: »
    You make it sound like such a chore.

    Grate a cucumber, put the contents in greek yoghurt = poor mans tzatziki.

    Chuck in a few garli cloves, olive oil, lemon and mint and you have the real deal.

    It sounds like youve put more effort in to getting an off the shelf version already.

    Or are you on about gyros mixes?

    Plus 1 for this. Takes about a minute, if that.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • mamanmaman Forumite
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    Callie22 wrote: »
    If you want to replicate the mix then buy some dried garlic granules and some dried dill, that's all that's in that mix (along with salt). You'd be able to buy a pot of each for about £1 each from any supermarket and they'd last just as long as the mix. I'd guess from looking at the mix it's about half-and-half of the garlic and dill, but if you bought them separately then you'd be able to mix it to how you prefer it. I have to say though that dried garlic tends not to taste that great ...


    I'm happy with Lazy Garlic and Lidl do an own brand version too.


    Surely having the separate dried herbs to make your own is much more versatile.
  • Callie22Callie22 Forumite
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    maman wrote: »
    I'm happy with Lazy Garlic and Lidl do an own brand version too.


    Surely having the separate dried herbs to make your own is much more versatile.


    Lazy garlic is fresh garlic, which is different from dried garlic granules. I find the dried garlic has a really odd flavour that's quite overwhelming.
  • mamanmaman Forumite
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    Callie22 wrote: »
    Lazy garlic is fresh garlic, which is different from dried garlic granules. I find the dried garlic has a really odd flavour that's quite overwhelming.


    Sorry I just meant to add to your post about OP making a mix.


    My point was that s/he could use store cupboard ingredients including Lazy Garlic (because as you said the dried isn't that good) to make tzatziki as then all the separate ingredients could be used for other things.
  • MrsStepfordMrsStepford Forumite
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    Tzatziki is so simple. Just make sure you squeeze the water out with clean hands before adding to the Greek or any other strained yogurt, otherwise it will make it watery. If you don't like garlic, don't use it. Dried garlic and garlic powder are inventions of the devil.

    Herb-wise, you could use mint, parsley, dill or chives. If money is tight, keep an eye out for reduced price herb plants in supermarkets, give them a bit of a prune, re-pot into a bigger pot if you can (wet soil would be fine as herbs are really only useful weeds)

    Mint is easy to grow from those supermarket fresh herb packets, if you see them reduced. Put some water in a shallow container, snip a bit off the bottom of the sprigs and place them in the water immediately, keeping the leaves out of the water. Put near a window and they will start to grow. Change the water if it looks discoloured, and when you have two new sets of leaves and quite a lot of roots, plant into a pot. Again, wet soil is good enough, but the young mint will grow faster if it's not in clumpy soil. If you want mint rampaging then plant in soil in bed, otherwise keep in pots. Once established, mint romps away and you won't have to buy any more.
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