Prolapsed Disc - Seeing Chiropractor

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Sports and Fitness MoneySaving
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mikeizzmikeizz Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Sports and Fitness MoneySaving
Apologies if i am posting this in the wrong place!

I have been trying to get back to fitness for a long time after suffering with a slipped disc back in 2014.

My wife got me a groupon deal to see a Chiropractor.

After inital consultation and scans it seems the my problem is my muscle tensions are all over the place, mainly due to my body trying to compensate from the pain that i had from the slipped disc.

They have told that they can fix me and be back to normal if i sign up to 24, 15 minute sessions (3 of them included in groupon deal) over a 14 week period.

The cost for this if i pay upfront is £705

What i want to know is are they playing the hard sell ? Is this good value? is this a common amount of sessions or excessive?

Any advice would be greatly recieved! :)

Replies

  • Chiropractors are renowned for promoting misinformation and pseudoscience.

    Based on this fact alone, I would say any money paid is poor value, let alone £705.

    Money would be better spent on physiotherapy, where real science *tends* to be used, and I highly doubt you would need £700 worth of treatments.

    I am assuming you have already spoken with your doctor? I got to see physio on NHS for my issues. A wait time of a few months for an appointment, but if you have been trying for that long, waiting a little longer doesn't seem that bad? (assuming you are in the UK)
  • mikeizzmikeizz Forumite
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    Robinio wrote: »
    Chiropractors are renowned for promoting misinformation and pseudoscience.

    Based on this fact alone, I would say any money paid is poor value, let alone £705.

    Money would be better spent on physiotherapy, where real science *tends* to be used, and I highly doubt you would need £700 worth of treatments.

    I am assuming you have already spoken with your doctor? I got to see physio on NHS for my issues. A wait time of a few months for an appointment, but if you have been trying for that long, waiting a little longer doesn't seem that bad? (assuming you are in the UK)


    Thank you for the response.

    Now i have had time to ponder i feel that the £700 fee is rather excessive!

    I'm fortunate to have private medical , so planning on getting a gp referal.

    In hindsight I should have probably have gone down this route first.

    Looking back i feel that i was certainly given a good sales pitch by the Chiropractor and feel agitated by this.
  • Hi mikeizz,

    Firstly, that was a nice gesture by your wife. She obviously cares about seeing you well.

    Now, about Chiros.

    I'm not going to say all Chiropracters are bad. Like any field there are good and bad therapists so it's not fair to write off a whole profession. That said, i think THIS type of Chiropracter is at best irresponsible and at worst a con artist.

    They're charging you almost £120 an hour and making promises about time frames that not a single therapist on the planet can, in good conscience, make. I can guarantee that, at the end of this highly expensive treatment course, another will be recommended.

    So help me God if a treatment consists of you being on a table with wedges under you whilst the Chiro treats multiple people at the same time! That kind of treatment is an absolute travesty and abuse of people's trust in the profession.

    Any good therapist will tell you that treatment time varies and, the longer standing an injury has been, the more complications can arise on the path to recovery. They'll also tell you that, in order to get back to health, you'll need to think about lifestyle and incorporating some remedial movements into your daily routine. The more you do, the more you mitigate the need for treatment and vice versa.

    I would look for a local Physio or Osteo who respects you enough to be honest with you. It'll be a darn site cheaper too.

    I'm a qualified soft tissue therapist and Chiro's like the above give us ALL a bad name. A decent therapist will do you wonders. Good luck on your road to recovery!
  • JJ_EganJJ_Egan Forumite
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    I would look for a local Physio or Osteo
    I would agree .
    Chiropractic been making it up as they go along since day one .
    Dr James Cyriax my hero .
  • Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    I would never spend my own money(*) on either a chiropractor or an osteopath. (The NHS does not provide either service - I wonder why).


    To be on the safe side - ask your GP what you should do. They might suggest spending money to see a physiotherapist privately or they might get you a NHS consultation for free. (I've had a three month course of NHS physio treatment at my GP's surgery and I had the referral within ten days. If you don't ask you don't get - what you've already paid for through taxes etc.)


    I used to be involved in commissioning training for NHS health professionals. We spent millions training physios but I don't recall any budget for osteopaths and chiropractors.


    (*) I would, and have, spent quite a lot on private physio sessions.
  • mikeizzmikeizz Forumite
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    I would just like to thank you all for my replies and you have all given me some excellent advice.

    I am quite angry now that basically the Chiropractor is using groupon to get people through the door in pursuit of then trying to extract as much money out of an individual!

    I think i am going to tell them how I feel and get in touch with groupon about this issue.

    Perhaps i should have seen the warning signs by the fact that are looking for business with cheap offers on Groupon!

    Thank you all again :)
  • Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    Go to your GP and ask for a NHS physio appointment. As I posted earlier I had a course of NHS physio provided at my own GP's surgery. The NHS community trust offering the service rang me the day after I'd seen my GP and they gave me an appointment the following week. Other parts of the country may not be so efficient.


    Forget complaining to Groupon - waste of time. Move on.


    Ten out of ten to your wife for trying to help!
  • edited 13 November 2017 at 4:34PM
    dunrovingdunroving Forumite
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    edited 13 November 2017 at 4:34PM
    Every profession has their good and bad. In a situation like yours, a chiro is perhaps an obvious choice, because they specialise in the spine. However, a bad chiro is no use to you.

    I'd say any physio/osteo/chiro who tries to get you to sign up to a "deal" like this should be treated with caution. So, there are two discussions really - whether you should go to THIS person (I'd say no, because of the whole "sign up now" mentality), and whether you should go to a physio, osteo or chiro.

    My own experience stems from a longstanding back problem that started 45 years ago when I fell on my back from a great height (thanks to a bad PE teacher/gymnastics coach). 10 years ago it became particularly problematic and I went to see a chiro. In that instance, and in the 10 years since, she has been very effective in her 15-minute, £35 sessions, at reducing my back pain. I've only seen her on an as needed basis so there were years I didn't see her at all and other years when I'd knacker my back again and would see her for several sessions.

    During those 10 years I also saw an osteopath, and she was absolutely useless. However, I think (from talking to other people who have used an osteo) that she was simply bad at her job. I am still open-minded about osteos and would give them another chance if needed.

    Recently I knackered my back again, and on this occasion it has been very different (much greater sciatic involvement, and all the pain and problems in a different place - more piriformis/butt rather than lower back/lumbar vertebrae issues). I had 4-5 sessions with my chiro and she has been very ineffective this time, so I am currently paying to see a physio privately and she seems so far to really know her stuff and has been effective in helping me to get better.

    Bottom line, I think, is that generally a good physio is better than a good chiro or osteo. NHS are free, but my experiences with NHS physios is that they are overworked and if you can afford to go private you might get better treatment. Up here in Scotland, an NHS referral can take months, which also means you need to get you wallet out if the need is urgent (that's why I ended up going private).
    (Nearly) dunroving
  • mikeizzmikeizz Forumite
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    dunroving wrote: »
    Every profession has their good and bad. In a situation like yours, a chiro is perhaps an obvious choice, because they specialise in the spine. However, a bad chiro is no use to you.

    I'd say any physio/osteo/chiro who tries to get you to sign up to a "deal" like this should be treated with caution. So, there are two discussions really - whether you should go to THIS person (I'd say no, because of the whole "sign up now" mentality), and whether you should go to a physio, osteo or chiro.

    My own experience stems from a longstanding back problem that started 45 years ago when I fell on my back from a great height (thanks to a bad PE teacher/gymnastics coach). 10 years ago it became particularly problematic and I went to see a chiro. In that instance, and in the 10 years since, she has been very effective in her 15-minute, £35 sessions, at reducing my back pain. I've only seen her on an as needed basis so there were years I didn't see her at all and other years when I'd knacker my back again and would see her for several sessions.

    During those 10 years I also saw an osteopath, and she was absolutely useless. However, I think (from talking to other people who have used an osteo) that she was simply bad at her job. I am still open-minded about osteos and would give them another chance if needed.

    Recently I knackered my back again, and on this occasion it has been very different (much greater sciatic involvement, and all the pain and problems in a different place - more piriformis/butt rather than lower back/lumbar vertebrae issues). I had 4-5 sessions with my chiro and she has been very ineffective this time, so I am currently paying to see a physio privately and she seems so far to really know her stuff and has been effective in helping me to get better.

    Bottom line, I think, is that generally a good physio is better than a good chiro or osteo. NHS are free, but my experiences with NHS physios is that they are overworked and if you can afford to go private you might get better treatment. Up here in Scotland, an NHS referral can take months, which also means you need to get you wallet out if the need is urgent (that's why I ended up going private).

    Thank you for this valuable information. Good to hear from someone who has clearly taken a look at all the different options.
  • dunrovingdunroving Forumite
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    mikeizz wrote: »
    Thank you for this valuable information. Good to hear from someone who has clearly taken a look at all the different options.

    Just spotted your reply, which prompts me to add another reason to go to a (good) physio - they will teach you exercises that you can do to *self manage* (think moneysaving!) your condition.

    The problem with a chiro (and osteo, I assume, from my own experience) is that you are locked into seeing them for "treatment", which for many conditions isn't always necessary as you can self-manage at least up to a point. It's a bit like a dentist not telling you to clean your teeth, avoid sugar or floss; you'd never dream of seeing a dentist to fix your rotten teeth, when you could prevent them going rotten in the first place ... these are all important self-managing/prevention techniques and you only need to see the dentist to check they are working, or fix a problem if they aren't working. Same with a lot of back problems - why pay a chiro £35 a pop when you can save yourself money and manage your own health?

    The (private) physio I have been seeing has been teaching me how to do specific exercise and movements correctly so I can do them in my own time. And she doesn't press me to make another appointment, in fact as she often says, "The ball is in your court".
    (Nearly) dunroving
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