Tutoring

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Boost Your Income
13 replies 3.1K views
Sponge_CakeSponge_Cake Forumite
119 Posts
Fifth Anniversary 10 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Boost Your Income
My partner and I are looking into private tutoring.

Neither of us are qualified teachers, but both of us have worked in schools for many years as specialist support teaching and as a cover supervisor.

What is the best way to get into it? Is it better to go through an agency or advertise privately?
«1

Replies

  • mikep22mikep22 Forumite
    1.5K Posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭
    I went through a website - First Tutors. I am a qualified teacher, been a teacher for 8 years, and got a...fair amount of hits. But it wasnt for me.

    Id recommend you look into some form of teaching qualification to be really successful at this.

    Realistically you will get very little at this time of year as the exams are just finishing.
    Debt: May 15: £17335 Jul 16: £13874 Jan 17: £11,606 Dec 18: £8,308 Sept 19: £4,969 Jul 21: £890
    :beer:
  • Sponge_CakeSponge_Cake Forumite
    119 Posts
    Fifth Anniversary 10 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    I was thinking of starting it in the new term.

    Is it hard to get clients if you're not a qualified teacher? We both have plenty of experience in schools.
  • WizzbangWizzbang Forumite
    4.7K Posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Rampant Recycler
    ✭✭✭✭
    What other qualifications do you hold? Most parents will be looking for a degree as a minimum, the same as teachers have. Anyone conscientious will also be looking for a teaching qualification. Some schools will hire tutors with a minimum of an A-level in a subject, but usually only to help up to GCSE. The rule in academia is that you should always hold the qualification above the one you are teaching.
    Minimalist
    Extra income since 01/11/12 £36,546.45

  • Sponge_CakeSponge_Cake Forumite
    119 Posts
    Fifth Anniversary 10 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    Wizzbang wrote: »
    What other qualifications do you hold? Most parents will be looking for a degree as a minimum, the same as teachers have. Anyone conscientious will also be looking for a teaching qualification. Some schools will hire tutors with a minimum of an A-level in a subject, but usually only to help up to GCSE. The rule in academia is that you should always hold the qualification above the one you are teaching.

    He has a degree in material science and supports science in a secondary school, so has quite a bit of knowledge about GCSE and whats needed there. He's also got A Level Maths and is very good in that subject too.

    I have a degree in sociology and support in a primary school, but I'm willing to tutor Sociology, English and pupils at primary level (11+ or SATs)
  • mikep22mikep22 Forumite
    1.5K Posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭
    Wizzbang wrote: »
    What other qualifications do you hold? Most parents will be looking for a degree as a minimum, the same as teachers have. Anyone conscientious will also be looking for a teaching qualification. Some schools will hire tutors with a minimum of an A-level in a subject, but usually only to help up to GCSE. The rule in academia is that you should always hold the qualification above the one you are teaching.

    I agree, I'm not sure why someone would hire a tutor who isn't a qualified teacher to be honest. That said, I'm sure they exist. But the teaching qualification shows you have the ability and experience to teach, and you cannot get on those courses without relevant subject qualifications (eg for me Web Management) - and if the persons parents are paying £15-20p/h you would think it would be quite important.

    One of the big mistakes people make (especially in government where they do not understand education) is that subject knowledge does not equal the ability to teach, they are entirely separate skills.
    You would need to sell all of the one-to-one work you do with learners to give yourself the best chance.
    Debt: May 15: £17335 Jul 16: £13874 Jan 17: £11,606 Dec 18: £8,308 Sept 19: £4,969 Jul 21: £890
    :beer:
  • Sponge_CakeSponge_Cake Forumite
    119 Posts
    Fifth Anniversary 10 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    I know I'm not a qualified teacher, but I do have a fair amount of teaching experience as I teach one to one everyday - even though I'm only support staff.
    My job is very difficult because I'm dealing with extremely challenging behaviour on a one to one basis. The pay is crap in comparison to the work I do.
    One to one tutoring is basically one to one teaching and I've got loads of experience in that so I don't see how it can be much different. I haven't taught a class but then I wouldn't be when tutoring anyway.

    Thanks for the input. I'm going to try some agencies and really try to sell myself using my one to one teaching experience.
  • WizzbangWizzbang Forumite
    4.7K Posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Rampant Recycler
    ✭✭✭✭
    I know I'm not a qualified teacher, but I do have a fair amount of teaching experience as I teach one to one everyday - even though I'm only support staff.
    My job is very difficult because I'm dealing with extremely challenging behaviour on a one to one basis. The pay is crap in comparison to the work I do.
    One to one tutoring is basically one to one teaching and I've got loads of experience in that so I don't see how it can be much different. I haven't taught a class but then I wouldn't be when tutoring anyway.

    Thanks for the input. I'm going to try some agencies and really try to sell myself using my one to one teaching experience.

    Out of interest, why are you both sticking as TAs when you have degrees? The Gov provides free money for science subjects, maths and other shortage subjects. You only need to take 9 months to train as a teacher and yeah, the pay is utter crap for what they ask you to do. But at least it's liveable, unlike a TA or cover supervisor wage.
    Minimalist
    Extra income since 01/11/12 £36,546.45

  • Sponge_CakeSponge_Cake Forumite
    119 Posts
    Fifth Anniversary 10 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    Wizzbang wrote: »
    Out of interest, why are you both sticking as TAs when you have degrees? The Gov provides free money for science subjects, maths and other shortage subjects. You only need to take 9 months to train as a teacher and yeah, the pay is utter crap for what they ask you to do. But at least it's liveable, unlike a TA or cover supervisor wage.

    Hi again,

    The reason we are both support assistants is because we enjoy it and although it's badly paid, working with SEN children on a one to one basis is very rewarding. Also we both suffer with anxiety and struggle under extreme stress (we met at an anxiety support group - not relevant but gives you an idea of how we are)
    I've been told by most of my teacher friends not to do it and do anything else because it's mega stressful. One of my oldest friends is an NQT currently and in tears everyday. She is thinking of quitting as she can't cope with the pressure. I may consider training if things change within the education system. It's all too much about policies, meeting targets and assessments nowadays. The real art of teaching has disappeared and with it, the morale of staff and pupils.

    Luckily we live in the North so our cost of living is okay, even on our wages...and if we were to have a family in the future we should get help from universal credit etc. as we've looked into it. If we were living in the South, we wouldn't be able to rent or buy a place, let alone live fairly comfortably.
  • WizzbangWizzbang Forumite
    4.7K Posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Rampant Recycler
    ✭✭✭✭
    Fair points- my OH is a teacher and we are down South. We could begin to manage after about 4 years of him teaching and finally got off of tax credits. However, you are right that the stress is terrible and he is expected to work 60 hour weeks. However we don't really have a choice, as you need about £30K a year to even break even down here. We have seen most of his other NQTs quit, many within the first year. I don't know when the Gov will do something about the appalling conditions teachers are working in.

    The way we have made it work is for him to say no to most extracurricular things, refuse any extra responsibilities like deputy head of year, head or year etc and generally not keep up with certain aspects. Like marking everything they say you should be marking.
    Minimalist
    Extra income since 01/11/12 £36,546.45

  • ryry91ryry91 Forumite
    19 Posts
    Hi there,
    I was a TA (1:1 like yourselves) and started out tutoring over a year ago. I started off with just one child and now tutor five children Monday-Friday evenings. As I am not a qualified teacher, I offer a reduced rate and ensure the families I meet understand that whilst I am not a qualified teacher I have experience in developing children's learning in both a supporting role and in formal teaching situations.

    The best way - if your school allows - is to put the feelers out to your parents. I am very fortunate that my school doesn't have a problem with me privately tutoring the pupils in our school so long as it is not on school premises, however some schools may frown on this. Also put the feelers out there on Facebook, I am sure someone will know someone (who may know someone and so on...) who is looking for a tutor.

    Also, play to your strengths; there is a small market for specialist SEN tutors, in particular parents who have children with Autism may prefer to have someone who is more experienced at working with an Autistic child on a 1:1 basis. I do SALT and Social Skills with one of my children I tutor so there is definitely a market out there.

    There are also some apps for smartphones/tablets that act as a tutoring, not sure if I am allowed to put up the name of the app I used but it cost me £7.99 a month to be a gold member and I filled all my tutoring spaces in a 3 months. Again I made sure I made it clear that I was not a qualified teacher but very experienced in working with children.

    I hope this helps somewhat :)
    Survey Savings for Xmas 2018: £5.08 / £150
    Debt Free Wannabe 2018
    Jan '18 Debt: £8068.15
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Ultrafast broadband upgrades

Being made available to more English counties

MSE News

30+ ways to stop scams

Incl tips to spot 'em & what to do if you're scammed

MSE Guides

£37 of No7 beauty products for £12

Available online and in stores

MSE Deals