Campaigners raise £65,000 for legal challenge to women's state pension changes

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  • colsten
    colsten Posts: 17,597 Forumite
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    The judicial review is already dead in the water.

    One woman took it to the European Court Of Human Rights in 2008. The judgment is clear https://t.co/gZbKG4JEZR

    £65,000 is an awful lot of money just to be pointed at that judgment :eek:
  • dunstonh
    dunstonh Posts: 116,597 Forumite
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    There should definitely have been much more effective communication about the 1995 changes.

    It was in the news. It was in the papers. Financial advisers were making people aware of it as were pension providers (it was quite a big marketing thing at that time with pension providers using it as a reason to get people to do more in their own pensions). Banks were too in their flyers etc. Lloyds Bank, for example, had cards they gave out to women customers showing them the change in age.

    Most of those affected by this change were in their late 30s to mid 40s. So, perhaps it was more a case that they didnt see it because it wasnt something that concerned them at that time.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • mjm3346
    mjm3346 Posts: 46,942 Forumite
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    This is one the Govt should change tack on. Next year make the state pension for all available at age 65, then phase in any further increases after that.
  • Silvertabby
    Silvertabby Posts: 9,086 Forumite
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    And I still can't get my head round why they call themselves WASPI (Women Against State Pension Inequality) - shouldn't it be WASPE (Women Against State Pension Equality)?
    Originally posted by Silvertabby
    When they talk about equality, they don't have gender equality in mind. What they are talking about is women who were born before April 6 1950, i.e. whose state pension age was 60. That's what they really want, a state pension paid from age 60. Naturally, they also want it at the full new rate of £155.65 a week, regardless of any contracting out, and they couldn't care less who pays. Their greed knows no bounds.

    Colsten, in that case why aren't they campaigning for State pension ages to be restored to the original 70 for both sexes (and apply means testing) which were the the rules when the State pension was introduced over 100 years ago? Cherry picking springs to mind!
  • molerat
    molerat Posts: 32,008 Forumite
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    colsten wrote: »
    The judicial review is already dead in the water.

    One woman took it to the European Court Of Human Rights in 2008. The judgment is clear https://t.co/gZbKG4JEZR

    £65,000 is an awful lot of money just to be pointed at that judgment :eek:
    How could it have gone to court in 2008 when no one knew anything about any changes until around 2013 ? :rotfl:
  • Living_proof
    Living_proof Posts: 1,921 Forumite
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    mgdavid wrote: »
    do you now appreciate the benefit of reading newspapers and keeping oneself informed of current affairs?

    I mention that as it was such an insignificant item in my Telegraph, it was easily missed by a working mum in own business with two very young children. I am not denying that I knew about it in 1995, and accepted it as something which had to happen. But it changed again too soon, too late to adapt and totally without flexibility. If there's a demographic time-bomb why did leaders not keep themselves informed about it - decades ago?
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  • p00hsticks
    p00hsticks Posts: 12,945 Forumite
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    dunstonh wrote: »
    Jumping on a bandwagon without realising what you are campaigning for. When MSE backed the campaign, Waspi wanted a return to age 60 for Women.

    To be accurate, the original petition asked for 'fair transitional arrangements' for the women most affected by the changes.
    The petition wording was very vague as to exactly what their ask was, and it was only later that the full demands of seeing the state pension age returned to 60 for women born in the 1950's became clear. I susect if the petition had explicity stated that in the first place it might have attracted less support, especially from organisations such as MSE.
    colsten wrote: »
    When they talk about equality, they don't have gender equality in mind. What they are talking about is women who were born before April 6 1950, i.e. whose state pension age was 60.

    No , rather arbitrarily WASPI appears to be campaigning just for a subset of women born IN the 1950's. In particular, the 2011 act gave a relatively small group of women (born in 1953 and 1954) only a few years notice of the further increase in their SPA of up to eighteen months.

    For what it's worth, women born in the 1960's and 70's also started their working lives believing they would have an SPA of 60 and have seen it rise to 66, in line with increased life expectancy.
    WASPIs demands are still not 100% clear to me, but it seems that they would like to see the SPA to be 60 for all women born up to 31/12/1959 and the increase in a step jump to 66 for those born in 1960 and later.
  • Living_proof
    Living_proof Posts: 1,921 Forumite
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    dunstonh wrote: »
    It was in the news. It was in the papers. Financial advisers were making people aware of it as were pension providers (it was quite a big marketing thing at that time with pension providers using it as a reason to get people to do more in their own pensions). Banks were too in their flyers etc. Lloyds Bank, for example, had cards they gave out to women customers showing them the change in age.

    Most of those affected by this change were in their late 30s to mid 40s. So, perhaps it was more a case that they didnt see it because it wasnt something that concerned them at that time.

    Maybe it's because we are bombarded with so much marketing carp that we treat it all with a pinch of salt. As I recall the financial advisers at the time were courting my (then) husband whose pension arrangements were much more lucrative then mine would ever have been. It shouldn't be down to the financial advisers anyway - it was a major change to many women's future and should have been very clearly communicated by the DHSS or whoever was responsible at that time.
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  • bmm78
    bmm78 Posts: 423 Forumite
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    If there's a demographic time-bomb why did leaders not keep themselves informed about it - decades ago?

    Successive governments kicked the can down the road. If you want to be really generous to them, you could argue that delays in equalisation were needed to allow the effects of various pieces of equality legislation to seep through.

    The Barber Judgement in 1990 and subsequent pressure from the European Commission effectively forced the government’s hand with equalisation.

    The irony of attempting to legally challenge laws that were prompted by a court ruling is probably lost on most Waspis.
    I work for a financial services intermediary specialising in the at-retirement market. I am not a financial adviser, and any comments represent my opinion only and should not be construed as advice or a recommendation
  • bmm78
    bmm78 Posts: 423 Forumite
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    colsten wrote: »
    The judicial review is already dead in the water.

    One woman took it to the European Court Of Human Rights in 2008. The judgment is clear https://t.co/gZbKG4JEZR

    £65,000 is an awful lot of money just to be pointed at that judgment :eek:

    For balance, the lady in question had no legal backing, and the court's assessment related only to the 1995 Act.

    Not that it likely makes any difference, and the government took extensive legal advice prior to the passing of the 2011 Act, particularly with regard to the timetable.
    I work for a financial services intermediary specialising in the at-retirement market. I am not a financial adviser, and any comments represent my opinion only and should not be construed as advice or a recommendation
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