Is the BBC costing Brits a fortune when they go on holiday?

This is the discussion to link on the back of Martin's blog. Please read the blog first, as this discussion follows it.
Read Martin's "Is the BBC costing Brits a fortune when they go on holiday?" Blog.

Please click 'post reply' to discuss below.

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  • unforeseenunforeseen Forumite
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    Martin obviously doesn't understand that a lot og the restrictions are put in place by the programs rights holders and not the BBC.

    You would think that as an investigative journalist Martin would check things out before making himself look inept in print
  • D.A.D.A. Forumite
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    Also, many home routers now allow you to set up a VPN through them, thus you're actually using your home broadband connection.

    No need at all for a commercial service if you have a router that supports it, and if you have a TV licence, there's no way whatsoever that the BBC can object to it.
  • edited 12 September 2016 at 6:37PM
    MSE_MartinMSE_Martin MoneySaving Expert
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    edited 12 September 2016 at 6:37PM
    unforeseen wrote: »
    Martin obviously doesn't understand that a lot og the restrictions are put in place by the programs rights holders and not the BBC.

    You would think that as an investigative journalist Martin would check things out before making himself look inept in print


    Don't worry I am aware for SOME shows (inc olympics) part of this is a restriction due to TV broadcast rights. I've worked in TV a long time, owned my own production company, and my own rights. I just didnt feel that level of detail was necessary in a quick blog If you really want to explore it though.

    1) For many shows on the iplayer the BBC is the rights owner. The BBC could permit its own programmes to be used in this way and open them up
    2) It could then block the other shows. or better still negotiate a rights deal for BBC licence holders (who by definition are in the UK). That closed user group would apply worldwide; hopefully without rights restrictions.

    I have tweaked the blog to refer to those points - so thank you for the comments.
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.
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  • It's possible to use the local broadcaster's equivalent of iPlayer when abroad to watch their broadcasts, for example of the Olympics.

    For anyone thinking of watching UK content using Three's "Feel At Home" free roaming in selected countries, streaming video almost certainly won't work, an streaming audio is unlikely too - they are not banned as such, but Three only makes limited bandwidth available so data heavy usage isn't really viable.
  • I am in favour of the licence fee and don't begrudge paying it (I know a lot of people do!).

    I can't, on the face of it, see a problem with Martin's suggestion below.
    On 1 September the TV licence rules changed. Now to watch BBC iPlayer, whether live or catch-up, you must have a TV licence (it used to be only live TV). So why not make this a log-in service, then the millions of Brits who go abroad each year and want to get their TV online, having paid their licence, will be able to do so?

    Does the same apply to radio, by the way? Is it equally tricky/expensive to listen to BBC radio on the internet when you're in another country?
  • I read a while ago about European proposals to try to fix rights clearance problems with providing TV abroad. I wondered if anyone knew anything more about this?

    The idea was that if you have a login to a service like iPlayer or Netflix in your home country you'll be able to watch it elsewhere in Europe, and the broadcaster wouldn't need to get rights cleared again - basically like Martin's idea. When it was proposed they said it would be introduced at the same time as when they abolish roaming charges.

    I wondered if anyone knows more about this and whether it is going to be agreed (I haven't been able to find much info on it). It would be great if Martin could look into it and update this blog!
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