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MoneySaving Poll: Should the NHS pay for IVF treatments?

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  • jazmad
    jazmad Posts: 24 Forumite
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    Nicky5404 wrote: »
    I have just voted.
    I think ivf should be funded. At the moment it's totally a postcode lottery, which really isn't fair.
    Unless you have suffered from infertility you have no idea how painful it really is. Fostering and adoption is great but it's just not the same as having your own child.

    My wife and I had some fertility treatment on the nhs, but stopped short of ivf and are now very happy to have adopted our beautiful daughter. Adoption might not be for you, but please don't imply our daughter is anyone other than ours!
  • jazmad
    jazmad Posts: 24 Forumite
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    At the risk of the discussion getting sidetracked, to clarify my previous comment, our daughter is 100% our child. She is also 100% the birth child of her birth parents. These are integral parts of her identity.

    These facts do not make the relationship we enjoy with our daughter "not the same" as a child who is raised by their birth parents.
  • missbiggles1
    missbiggles1 Posts: 17,481 Forumite
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    Nicky5404 wrote: »
    I have just voted.
    I think ivf should be funded. At the moment it's totally a postcode lottery, which really isn't fair.
    Unless you have suffered from infertility you have no idea how painful it really is. Fostering and adoption is great but it's just not the same as having your own child.

    That is a truly appalling thing to say!

    While there are people on waiting lists for life saving and debilitating conditions, luxuries like IVF should be funded by the people involved.
  • edwink
    edwink Posts: 2,981 Forumite
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    edited 11 November 2015 at 3:40PM
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    We were not able to have any Children by the time I was 28. We both accepted that and got on with our lives. We did not focus on the negatives of not being able to have any, instead we put our energy in to the positives of our relationship. We loved each other, we were best friends, we respected each other and enjoyed being with each other. Having a child in our loving relationship would have been perfect for us although it was not to be. But we carried on with our lives and did not look back in sadness about it. We would never have considered IVF privately funded or through the NHS because 1, we could not afford it ourselves and 2, there are people that are suffering under the NHS because there isn't enough funding for their treatment. Plus there are people that have died because there sadly is not enough funding for their treatment.


    Why spend NHS funding on IVF to create a life when there is not enough funding to preserve a life???
    **3.36 kWp solar panel system, 10 x Ultima & 4 x Panasonic solar panels, Solaredge Inverter **Biomass boiler stove for cooking, hot water & heating **2000ltr Rainwater harvesting system for loo flushing - **Hybrid Toyota Auris car **1 ex-battery hen - RIP Pingu, Hoppy & Ginger ****Hens & Ducks**** chat thread. http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5282209
  • System
    System Posts: 178,117 Community Admin
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    Anything the government spends will circulate the economy and eventually come back as tax (as long as it doesn't leave the country), therefore anything government spends is vastly cheaper than anything a person spends.

    And its very sad when a couple that want children can't have them, ivf fails too often to fairly stop at one. And consider we spend lots of Monet on less deserving scroungers and criminals
  • marleyboy
    marleyboy Posts: 16,698 Forumite
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    Adoption IS your own child. You raise them, teach them, nurture them. They just don't pass on your biological bumph.

    HBS x
    I would say the fact they dont carry your biology make them anything BUT your child, by all means it makes you an adoptive parent, but nowhere near being THE parent.

    By your logic, there is nothing to stop a Wife having a child by someone else and simply saying to her husband, "yes but as YOU will be bringing them up with me, I don't see an issue with it".
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  • BabyMaybe
    BabyMaybe Posts: 4 Newbie
    edited 13 November 2015 at 12:32PM
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    I’ve had IVF treatment provided by the NHS. It took three goes to be successful. And it was no easy course of action.

    (Text removed by MSE Forum Team)

    I honestly don’t know if it should be provided free. I’ve struggled with that one myself, but accepted it because it was offered.

    But having done it I have read up a lot and experienced a lot so here are some things that might inform the debate.

    Infertility is a medical condition: It is a disorder of the reproductive system. People are designed to reproduce, and if you can’t do it your body isn’t working properly. Infertility tends to have an underlying cause such as polycystic ovaries or low sperm count, and even ‘unexplained infertility’ probably has a medical cause it is just that it isn’t one that the current tests can explain. As a disorder infertility is something that doctors have studied and to a certain extent understand, and it is therefore no surprise that some doctors have found a way to compensate for the consequences (i.e. IVF etc.)

    Not providing IVF free fuels income inequality: Infertility affects people from all backgrounds, but if everyone had to pay IVF would only in practice be available to people on high incomes.

    The NHS only provide IVF for free when they think it will work: In order to get free IVF treatment on the NHS you have to have a medical diagnosis of infertility and you need to meet certain criteria around never having had a child, young age, healthy BMI, not smoking. This is because IVF is most likely to work in certain circumstances. So the NHS doesn’t ‘waste’ its resources on cases where it is unlikely to work.

    Three free cycles are given to mimic the normal reproductive system: The point of IVF is to artificially create the optimum conditions for growing a baby, by collecting and fertilising multiple eggs so the embryo with the best chance can be used, and concurrently priming the womb so it is ready to receive the egg. But. About half of ‘normal’ embryos created by normally fertile couples have genetic defects and do not turn into a healthy pregnancy. This is why it usually takes a normally fertile couple a few months to get pregnant. So even though IVF creates optimum conditions, optimum conditions only work half of the time. So this is why the NHS offer three goes at IVF to mimic the normal state of affairs and give the infertile couple a fair shot. And if it doesn’t work after three goes, it probably won’t work (see previous point).

    Adoption may not be as easy as you think: These days you don’t have to have a baby unless you want one. We have contraception, emergency contraception and abortion. In general people only give up their babies/children for adoption when forced to. Children available to be adopted these days tend to have very complex physical and mental needs as a result of having come from difficult backgrounds where they have been neglected or come to physical harm. Social Services don’t just give these kids to anyone, they give them to people who can look after them properly. An infertile couple with no kids may find it difficult to prove that they have the capacity to give these kids a good home.
  • ayayay
    ayayay Posts: 97 Forumite
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    It costs on average around £11k per year to raise a child. If you can't afford IVF then you can't afford a child
  • missbiggles1
    missbiggles1 Posts: 17,481 Forumite
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    marleyboy wrote: »
    I would say the fact they dont carry your biology make them anything BUT your child, by all means it makes you an adoptive parent, but nowhere near being THE parent.

    By your logic, there is nothing to stop a Wife having a child by someone else and simply saying to her husband, "yes but as YOU will be bringing them up with me, I don't see an issue with it".

    If you could get past the infidelity issue, I'd agree with the wife. It isn't the genetic link that makes a parent.

    (And, by the way, if you adopt a child you do become its parent in all ways, not simply its adoptive parent.)
  • marleyboy
    marleyboy Posts: 16,698 Forumite
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    Which probably explains why I would choose NOT to adopt. To be MY child, a child would have to have been produced by both of us, else its not our true child.

    You can see there are far too many ifs and buts to make it remotely tempting for me to be an adoptive parent.
    :A:dance:1+1+1=1:dance::A
    "Marleyboy you are a legend!"
    MarleyBoy "You are the Greatest"
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    Marleyboy speaks sense
    marleyboy (total legend)
    Marleyboy - You are, indeed, a legend.
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